Oral Tracey: Usain Bolt should pay me (lol)

first_imgWhen Usain Bolt accused me of calling him a ‘sell-out’ who ‘sold out’ to Justin Gatlin in that infamous 200 metres final at the 2005 World Championships in Helsinki I reacted with dismay, knowing that I had never, called, and would never call Bolt a sell-out. For the record, I want to here and now categorically deny calling Bolt a sell-out. Desperate attempts are still being made to find the relevant commentary aired on August 11, 2005, the day of that fateful race, to verify that what I did say was that Bolt’s decision to jog the last 70 or 80 metres of that race was an act of cowardice, and he should have stopped if he was injured instead of walking to the line. I maintain to this day that it was a reasonable criticism of Bolt’s performance on that particular occasion, an opinion that many Jamaicans somehow equate with writing off the then emerging sprinter. There is, however, a fundamental difference between writing off an athlete and being critical of a specific performance by that athlete. Absolutely no one is beyond criticism, which in and of itself when merited is not necessarily a bad thing. It is how the individual responds to criticism that determines the effect of that criticism. I remember being confronted personally by Bolt about the particular incident in question. I remember telling him that my critique of him was not meant to tear him down, but to make him a better and stronger athlete and that those harsh words seemed to have done him well. PIVOTAL ROLE In all fairness, some unique and significant credit should be given for the pivotal role I played in the success story of Bolt. The mere fact that those stinging words resonated with him through the ebbs and flows of his now mega successful career suggests that those words helped to motivate, if not inspire, the now greatest sprinter of all time to the lofty heights he has attained. Criticism tends to spark the fire of excellence, and Bolt has risen above many challenges, including some moments worthy of criticism, to be now blazing a furnace of excellence. Even his exploits at last year’s World Championships in Beijing when the odds were stacked against him because of poor form and injuries, with the debate raging as to whether he would be able to overcome the challenge of a then marauding Gatlin, Bolt must have been well aware that in my capacity as his ‘main motivator’, I was early and emphatic in my prediction that he would lose to Gatlin in that 100-metre final. It is also reasonable to assume that Bolt, and the innate champion in him, must have drawn some motivation from that swirling sentiment, which helped him to put in that extra work needed to overcome the odds and prove the critics wrong in the emphatic way he did. During the last decade spanning the 2005 World Championships, through the thick and thin and ups and downs up to the 2015 Beijing World Championships, I genuinely believe that my motivational role in the building of Bolt the athlete and Bolt the brand has been immeasurable. In my retort to Bolt’s recent accusations, I suggested publicly that I was preparing an invoice to be delivered for my services. The big man subsequently responded on Twitter that he was looking forward to receiving that invoice. The tabulation continues, and the invoice will be delivered as I look forward to the day when l will be finally and adequately compensated.last_img read more

Read More »

Bautista silences hostile crowd, downs hometown bet

first_img“I don’t know what to do about the crowd, even if he (Kasim) blocks, the crowd applauded,” said the 22-year-old Bautista.He said he got confused and in the chaos that gripped the cramped Hall 8 of the spanking new Malaysia Interntional Trade and Exhibition Center, left everything to God.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’“Good thing He didn’t leave me,” said the defending 52kg champion.His coach, former Asian Games champion Elias Recaido told him to get the opening round. OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson 2 nabbed in Bicol drug stings “We needed that first round, but in the second round he got too eager,” said Recaido. “I was telling him to go for his midsection.”That visibly slowed down Kasim in the third round and the arena noise fell several decibels lower.“Good start sir,” said Bautista. “I will just fight on.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Albay to send off disaster response team to Batangas PH Volcanoes lose steam, bow out of gold medal hunt Teen gunned down in Masbate Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ LATEST STORIES National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)08:07Athletes treated to a spectacle as SEA Games 2019 officially ends06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball05:21Drama in karate: Tsukii ‘very sad’ over coach’s bullying, cold shoulder03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano View comments 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Ian Clark Bautista, right, with his coach Elias Recardo. INQUIRER/ Marc Anthony ReyesKUALA LUMPUR — Ian Clark Bautista punched his way through the flailing arms of his Malaysian foe Abdul Salam Kasim, whose every move elicited uproar from the big hometown crowd here Sunday.Fortunately for Bautista, his fists managed to silence them.ADVERTISEMENT Vilma Santos, Luis Manzano warn public of fake account posing as her MOST READlast_img read more

Read More »

Fort St. John shoots down competition at national championships

first_imgNew Totem Archery Club member Andy Fochuk earned himself top honours in the men’s compound bow Grand Prix, the final event of the national championship.Fochuk used his cool nerves and skill to bring home the bacon, shooting a small pig target several yards away, which stood only a single foot high.It was a successful weekend for Fochuk, who also placed third in the male bow hunting open event.- Advertisement -It wasn’t just Fochuk who did the local archery club proud, as Louis Hoffer won silver and Michael Cazes bronze in the men’s traditional event. In the men’s master 50 traditional, Pat Dressler’s steady aim earned him first place honours.The ladies also got in on the victory action over the weekend, as three local archers swept the female bow hunting release event. Lena Chapple shot her way to gold, Jessica Arsenault earned silver and Ruby Mannila walked away with a bronze.Success even spilled over into the junior categories, as local youths representing the New Totem’s pre-cub, cub and pee-wee categories earned a total of 8 medals throughout the weekend.Advertisement After hosting the event this year, next year’s event may require some travelling for the New Totem Archery Club, as the competition is set to take place in Winnipeg, Manitoba.For more information on the New Totem Archery Club, visit its official website.last_img read more

Read More »

Froggy went a’climbing

first_imgANGELES NATIONAL FOREST – When Glendora rock climber Troy Mayr started scaling the steep granite walls at Williamson Rock 15 years ago, he had the place pretty much to himself.Now, on a peak summer weekend, he shares the crags with 250 to 500 people, who come to climb at what has become one of the premier climbing destinations in Southern California.But this season, Williamson Rock, 6,700 feet above La Ca?ada in the San Gabriel Mountains, will be unusually quiet.Williamson has been closed to protect the mountain yellow-legged frog, whose numbers have been decimated. An estimated 100 adult frogs remained in the Southern California population in 2002, when it was listed as a federally endangered species. Scientists have not fully determined why the frog is struggling, but it may be due to fires, non-native predators and disease.The frogs live just upstream and downstream of the main climbing area in a stream at the base of the gorge. The Forest Service on Dec. 27 closed access to 1,000 acres north of Angeles Crest Highway in the Cooper Canyon area.Once considered a sport for only the most adventurous outdoorsmen, rock climbing has exploded in popularity over the past 10 years, with better equipment and the advent of indoor climbing gyms making the sport safer, more accessible and easier to learn.And Williamson Rock, with its 300 climbing routes, mild summer weather and convenient location off the Angeles National Highway, is a climber’s dream.“Anyone who is a climber in L.A. has been there, goes there, or is planning to go there,” said Kenny Suh, 24, of Pasadena, who teaches and works at an indoor climbing gym in Arcadia.Suh avoids Williamson on summer weekends because of the crowds.“There are dogs running around, kids running around. It gets noisy. Sometimes, it feels like a gym. But you can still find places to climb by yourself if you hike in more,” said Suh, who was dismayed at the closure.“I didn’t even know there were frogs there.”But as more crowds have flocked into the canyon, official management of the area has lagged.Two trails leading into the gorge are unmarked, and climbers and hikers who venture offtrail can land in frog habitat, or on easily eroded scree (rock debris) slopes, the home of a threatened plant species, Johnston’s Buckwheat. Some climbers leave behind human waste and trash.Mayr was among the first to set routes at Williamson, and later put the spot on the map with magazine articles and a climbing guidebook he wrote.He said he warned the Forest Service a decade ago that Williamson was going to be extremely popular, and they needed to develop one clear trail with signs, and find a way to dispose of human waste.There is a sign for Williamson Rock at the trailhead, and a parking lot, but no bathrooms.Cid Morgan, Angeles National Forest ranger, said most rock climbers are environmentally conscious.“You don’t notice the 99 percent of people following traffic rules. You notice the one person weaving in and out of traffic,” she said. “Unfortunately, if we have to close it, we have to close it to everyone.”While the likelihood of someone actually stepping on a frog is low, humans could disrupt egg masses, trample down habitat or degrade water quality with trash and waste, she said.The Forest Service may work out an arrangement to eventually allow climbing at Williamson, such as issuing a limited number of passes to visitors, making access to the area weather dependent, or assigning a ranger to monitor the spot, Morgan said.Mayr is organizing a nonprofit organization, Friends of Williamson Rock, to manage the area and raise funds, possibly to pay for a ranger to monitor the area.“The Forest Service has been very open minded to suggestions,” Mayr said.The length of the closure is unknown, but will probably last through the summer at least, officials said. Researchers are studying the impacts of human activity on the frog during the closure, which comes after an environmental group, the Center for Biological Diversity, sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to designate critical habitat for the frog.Lori Paul, a certified wildlife manager from Altadena, said the smallest species can often serve as indicators for the rest of the wildlife in an area. Studies of animals with short lifespans can reveal any damage human activity may be wreaking on a habitat long before any signs in longer lived species would show up.Since the frogs live in just a handful of pockets throughout the state, isolated populations can serve as reserves in case of catastrophic disaster in one region.“No one isolated population in one sense is truly expendable,” Paul said.Staff Writer Kimm Groshong contributed to this story. shirley.hsu@sgvn.com(626) 962-8811, Ext. 2306 AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read More »

FAI JUNIOR CUP: CARN THROUGH ON PENALTIES, MILFORD CRASH AGAINST HOLDERS

first_imgUPDATED: CARDONAGH FC are through to the last eight of the FAI Junior Cup after a long trek to Co Waterford today saw the Inishowen side win on penalties.The Donegal side’s clash away to Tramore Athletic remained goalless – even after extra time.So in the dramatic penalty shoot-out keeper Gerard Crossan was the hero of the day as he saved twice – to give Carn a 4-2 victory! They now have a home draw in the quarter finals against Dublin side Ballymun.Milford United’s hopes of progressing however were washed away in a 6-0 home defeat to Pike Rovers, the current cup holders from Limerick.The Donegal side were 3-0 down at half-time thanks to goals from Colin Enright, Eoin Hanrahan and Conor Kavanagh.David Ryan, Johnny Boyle and Kieran Hamlin hit three more in the second half. “We never really got going against the best side we have ever played against,” said United’s Peter Doherty afterwards.LAST EIGHT DRAW:Killbarrack vs SandyhillCarndonagh vs BallymunO’Deveney vs SherriffPike vs Clonmel CelticLEAVE YOUR COMMENT BELOW© 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights Reserved The copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailyFAI JUNIOR CUP: CARN THROUGH ON PENALTIES, MILFORD CRASH AGAINST HOLDERS was last modified: February 12th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:carndonagh fcmilford unitedlast_img read more

Read More »

Chelsea vs Derby: Live talkSPORT commentary, kick-off time and confirmed teams

first_img 1 Derby County manager Frank Lampard celebrates beating Manchester United REVEALED Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? MONEY Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade FOOTBALL LATEST Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade ADVICE center_img RANKED Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move REVEALED Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions BEST OF Chelsea haven’t lost here since April though and looked in sparkling form as they saw off Burnley 4-0 at the weekend.Maurizio Sarri has his players fired up and very much in the Premier League title race.What time is kick-off?This last-16 clash will be held on Wednesday, October 31.Kick-off is at 7.45pm.Derby haven’t played at Stamford Bridge since 2008, where they were handed a 6-1 hammering.How can I listen on the talkSPORT?You can hear live commentary of this game live on talkSPORT2 from 7.30pm.To listen to our sister station, tune in on your DAB radio, our mobile apps or by using the web player. Frank Lampard will hope for a dream homecoming as he returns to Stamford Bridge as Derby boss.The Rams manager guided his side to a memorable victory at Old Trafford in the last round and has been rewarded with a tie against his former employers. Confirmed teamsCHELSEA XI: Caballero; Zappacosta, Cahill, Chrsitensen, Emerson; Kante, Fabregas, Kovacic, Loftus-Cheek, Willian; Morata,DERBY XI: Carson; Bogle, Keogh, Tomori, Malone; Wilson, Mount, Lawrence, Huddlestone; Waghorn, Marriott.last_img read more

Read More »

Stunning gesture as Donegal Fire Service support hospices

first_imgMembers of the Donegal Fire Service recently held their fundraising day to raise cash for the various hospices.Members of the service gave up their time to have various car washes across the county in a bid to raise vital funds for the Donegal, Foyle and North West Hospices.And earlier this week members of the fire service handed over cheques to be used by the hospices towards their amazing work. Well done to everyone concerned.All pictures by Brian McDaid.Representatives of the three hospices, Donegal, Foyle and North West pictured at the presentations at a function in Sister Sara’s Letterkenny of cheques by the Donegal Fire Service from their annual car wash and collections Included seated are Carrie Harvey, Donegal Hospice, Yvonne Martin, Foyle Hospice, Mary McCarry, Donegal Hospice Bernie Mc Neely Northwest Hospice and Francis Drummond Ballyshannon. Back row from left are Damian Mc Namara, Burdoran Firestation, Stephen Mc Fadden Buncrana , Mickey Molloy, Letterkenny Annette Cunnigham Donegal Hospice, Cllr. Ciaran Brogan Chairman of SPC Donegal CO Council , Eddie Moore, Letterkenny Fire Station Eileen Mc Intyre Northwest Hospice Michael Purtill, Letterkenny and Kieran Drummond, Ballyshannon. Photo Brian McDaid.Damien Mc Namara and Eddie Moore make a presentation on behalf of the Donegal Fire Service Annual Car wash to Yvonne Martin repressing the Foyle Hospice. Photo Brian McDaid.Carrie Harvey, Mary Mc Garry and Annette Cunnigham respecting the Donegal Hospice pictured receiving a cheque for from the annual Donegal Fire Service Car Wash included were Stephen Mc Fadden Buncranan Fire Station , Michael Purtill, Cllr. Ciaran Brogan, Eddie Moore and Michael Molloy Letterkenny Fire Station. Photo Brian McDaid.Stunning gesture as Donegal Fire Service support hospices was last modified: November 28th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »

Projecting Sharks’ 23-man roster: Who’s trending, and who’s fading

first_imgSAN JOSE – Two Sharks preseason games are in the books and while some younger prospects have shown flashes in camp, time is running out for some other roster hopefuls to make an impression.Sharks coach Pete DeBoer said earlier this week he wants his final 23-man roster to have mostly taken shape by the time the team plays its final two preseason games — Sept. 26 at home against the Calgary Flames and Sept. 29 on the road vs. the Vegas Golden Knights.The Sharks have 55 players in camp right …last_img read more

Read More »

Gombe chimpanzee calls available after 40-year wait

first_imgFrans Plooij was a graduate student at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands in 1971 when he went to the Gombe National Park in Tanzania to study chimpanzee migration with his new wife, Hetty van de Rijt-Plooij. She had hoped to teach in a local school. But upon realizing that there were no settlements nearby, she decided to keep busy by using recording equipment to analyze the vocalizations of chimpanzees.With an outstretched hand holding a directional microphone, she diligently recorded the primates’ grunts, pant-hoots, and hoos, a sound like a whimper. The primates had gathered at a feeding site to eat bananas from a covered trench managed by scientists. Over 2 years, she recorded 28 tapes—more than 10 hours—of infant, juvenile, and adult chimpanzee calls. Now, for the first time, these calls are available to researchers in an article appearing in Scientific Data, a new open-access, online-only journal from Nature.In 1973, Plooij joined ethologist Robert Hinde at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and the couple had neither the time nor the resources to capitalize on their unique collection. After earning his doctoral degree from Groningen in 1980, Plooij spent the next 3 decades working in child development, while van de Rijt-Plooij earned her doctoral degree from Cambridge in physical anthropology and co-wrote with her husband a parenting book called The Wonder Weeks. “Your life moves on,” Plooij says. “We collected far too much, and the sound recordings remained in the attic.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Shortly before she died in 2003, van de Rijt-Plooij urged her husband to make the collection accessible to other researchers in hopes that the chimp calls might shed some light on the evolution of human language. And this week, Plooij was finally able to honor her wish, as information about the now-digitized recordings and her field notes is now freely available. “This is a unique collection that probably nobody will ever repeat,” he says. “So there was a great need, we felt, to make it available.”In Gombe, female chimpanzees often carry their infants with them into trees, making it very difficult for researchers to get accurate recordings from the ground. Anne Pusey, a behavioral ecologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, who also worked in Gombe, notes that the infants’ grunts are also “quite soft, so it’s difficult to get within range and record them.” However, at Gombe, mother chimpanzees would bring their infants as they checked the trench for bananas, giving van de Rijt-Plooij the chance to note their interactions and record their vocalizations.Apart from the quantity of information, the new collection also includes two elements rarely captured: quiet vocalizations like a chimpanzee’s “hoo” of surprise, and young chimps’ soft grunts. Lorraine McCune, a language researcher at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, analyzes human infants’ grunts and coos to understand the acquisition of language. From infancy to adulthood, chimpanzees come to use grunts for communication, similar to the way humans learn to communicate through grunts like “mm” or “mm-hmm” as they grow. Chimpanzees’ calls are more stereotyped and less complicated than human language, but McCune hopes that comparing chimpanzee infants’ sounds with those of human infants may help reveal what’s unique about human infants’ sounds.“We don’t know how acoustically similar a chimpanzee infant’s grunt would be to a human infant’s grunt,” McCune says. “If [Plooij] has all the vocalizations and the field notes that say what was happening at the time, it would be much easier for me to see how those particular grunts related to what I find in human infants.”The data now reside in Cornell University’s Macaulay Library and the Dryad Digital Repository, another online resource.last_img read more

Read More »

I’m being unfairly singled out, says Navjot Singh Sidhu

first_imgAt the receiving end of Punjab Chief Minister and Congress leader Amarinder Singh’s criticism after the Lok Sabha poll results, State Local Bodies Minister Navjot Singh Sidhu on Thursday said he was being unfairly singled out in the name of poor performance of his department. Mr. Sidhu said the Ministry had worked in the most transparent manner. “The department has been able to generate ₹6,000 crore and all its projects are being completed on a war-footing.” There were a few people who didn’t want him in the party, he said. After the elections, Capt. Singh said he would take up with the Congress high command Mr. Sidhu’s “damaging remarks”, which might have led to the defeat in the Bathinda seat. He also said that Mr. Sidhu’s performance should be reviewed. Reacting to the remarks, Mr. Sidhu said the party had never been able to win the seat in the past 40 years. “Capt. Amarinder and his son Raninder Singh also lost from Bathinda,” he said.last_img read more

Read More »