Bob Lutz Unleashed On Autoline Of Course He Talks Tesla

Munro Eats Crow, Finds Tesla Model 3 To Be Highly Profitable What’s The Deal With Tesla’s Elon Musk And Bob Lutz? Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 24, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News We watch Autoline This Week and Autoline After Hours in their entirety as often as we get the opportunity. But, we know everyone is busy and may not have time to tune in to the whole episode. If you want to simply hone in on Maximum Bob’s Tesla talk, you can see the breakdown of topics in the video description below. We’ve highlighted those sections with BOLD font.To sum it up, Lutz gives kudos to Franz von Holzhausen and says that Tesla is the first car company with truly compelling designs. Honestly, Lutz says he loves Tesla cars, though he just doesn’t stand behind the business. McElroy agrees that there is nothing like Tesla’s offerings on the market today. He absolutely loved his recent test drive experience. However, Lutz goes on to say that this is temporary, as many automakers are coming to market with EVs that are just as good, if not better than Tesla vehicles … and they’re going to be cheaper. According to Bob, Tesla just doesn’t have the resources or technology to compete against ICE OEMs. Interestingly, the others set up a nice argument against Bob. Watch the segment to form your own opinion.Video Description via Autoline Network on YouTube:Bob Lutz: Live & Unleashed (And Yes, He Talks About Tesla) – Autoline After Hours 436SPECIAL GUEST: Bob Lutz, Former Vice Chairman, GMTOPICS:09:35 – Mid-Engine Corvette31:47 – RAM: Thanks Lutz!39:40 – Lutz’s Daily Driver43:19 – Pontiac Solstice48:49 – Maximum Bob Talks Tesla56:09 – Doctor Data59:46 – Lutz loves Rick Wagoner, Lee Iacocca1:04:44 – Will GM bring brands back to Europe?1:17:32 – Who should buy Tesla?1:22:17 – Tesla conversation continues**There is a technical issue at 1:18:16 in this broadcast For the continued Tesla conversation, please skip to 1:22:17PANEL:– Henry Payne, The Detroit News– Gary Vasilash, Automotive Design & Production– John McElroy, Autoline.tv Source: Electric Vehicle News Bob Lutz Believes Tesla CEO Elon Musk Should Step Down We could have almost predicted that Bob Lutz would be making a special appearance on Autoline to talk about Tesla.Surprised? We think not.Not long after we reported that Autoline’s John McElroy is seemingly (finally) becoming a Tesla believer – and Via’s Bob Lutz continues to have no faith in the Silicon Valley automaker – Lutz makes an appearance as a special guest on Autoline After Hours. This really comes as no surprise since we’ve also shed light, especially as of late, on the immense amount of Tesla and Tesla-related coverage in the industry today. Make no mistake, if there’s a link to Tesla (good or bad), it’s sure to be huge news on a multitude of platforms.Related Coverage: read more

British Electric Invasion Zapps HighPerformance EScooter

Zapp is a brand-new UK-based company that will launch its very first model, the i300 in November. In order to give a sense of what to expect, the company unveiled a teaser video of its first product that highlights certain of its features.The most striking one is undeniably the z-shaped frame of the scooter. The i300 will be built on a motorsport-inspired lightweight aluminum structure. At the front, a quirky-shaped windshield that reminds me of a Star Wars battle droid head is decorated with a honeycomb pattern repeated on the footrest.According to the designs used in the trailer, the scooter will sport a red front fairing with matching red front fork and coil spring suspension that will contrast the black ensemble nicely. Distribution of the power will be provided by what looks like a timing belt, meaning the motor isn’t directly propelling the back wheel like in some electric scooters and bikes.Power is expected to be comparable to that of a 300cc scooter. Because range remains one of the major roadblocks to the development of the electric bike market, Zapp promises the i300 will have a competitive range to offer, stating that “range anxiety is a thing of the past.” The compact battery will also be easy to carry along for easy charging wherever you have to be.A digital display is integrated into the handlebar and shows a series of buttons that will allow the future user to navigate the onboard computer, including turning “regen” on and off (regenerative braking maybe?). We don’t have a clear date for the model’s unveil; all we know for sure is that the Zapp i300 is “coming soon.”.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Yamaha Introduces New Range of E-Bikes Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 15, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Performance and scooter can go hand in handThe future of electric scooters lies in performance? The beauty of an electric powertrain is that you can get a lot of juice without having a big engine, and accelerations are insanely fun. While most scooters promote their cleanliness and absence of emissions, new Brit startup Zapp is instead promoting a high-performance electric scooter.More E-Bikes Source: Electric Vehicle News New Keanu Reeves Stunt Features Horse Against E-Bikes The Grom Reaper Takes You to E-Bike Heaven read more

Sensata Technologies acquires GIGAVAC for 233 million

Industrial sensor specialist Sensata Technologies (NYSE:ST) has reached an agreement to acquire privately-held electrification solution provider GIGAVAC for $233 million.Sensata is expanding its positions in electrical protection, thermal management and regenerative braking. The addition of GIGAVAC’s portfolio will enable Sensata to tap into the market for high-voltage contactors, which are critical components of both EVs and charging stations.GIGAVAC’s contactors are designed to provide safe operation at extremely high current levels, and are well-positioned to enable fast charging.GIGAVAC has over 270 employees, and expects to record $80 million in revenue for 2018. Its products are used by more than 1,500 customers in the automotive, battery storage, industrial, heavy vehicle and off-road markets. Some of these overlap with Sensata’s global customer base.Sensata intends to maintain GIGAVAC’s existing employee base and its headquarters in Carpinteria, California.“Over the past four months, we have significantly strengthened Sensata’s overall portfolio by divesting our lower-growth valves business, and acquiring a fast-growing, highly differentiated business in GIGAVAC,” said Martha Sullivan, CEO of Sensata. “The acquisition of GIGAVAC immediately increases Sensata’s content and capabilities for electrification. As we expand GIGAVAC’s customer reach, we expect to accelerate growth as the industry moves toward a more electrified fleet.” MORE: A closer look at contactors Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine Source: Sensata Technologies read more

We Have Luv For The Arcimoto FUV

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Arcimoto To Launch FUV Hub Rental Location In San Diego Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 26, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News If you drive it, you will too.I am just a little disappointed. I’m piloting a prototype from Arcimoto around a bend of a quiet residential Tallahassee street and the experience is not what I had secretly been hoping for. It’s not the fault of the three-wheeler. It’s me. I had wanted it to mimic a different kind of machine, one from my youth, but the all-electric FUV (Fun Utility Vehicle) is its own thing. Luckily, its unique charms silenced any disquiet in my head and soon won over my heart.More about Arcimoto 10 photoscenter_img Growing up on Canada’s east coast, I spent as much time as I possibly could on the back of the family’s trusty Polaris snowmobile. Every moment brought me unrivaled joy. Bombing down the frozen Petitcodiac river or carving my way through snow-laden spruce while open to the elements, it imbued me with an incredible feeling of freedom. Motorcycle enthusiasts say similar things of their riding experience. This 3-wheeled EV, with its sides equally as open, captures much of that same awesome feeling.I’ve been watching the progress over Arcimoto for some years now, so when the invitation to actually drive their pre-production machine arose, I jumped at it. A few days later and I’m in a parking lot of Cascades Park in Florida’s capital getting a bit of pre-flight instruction from company communications specialist, Jonathan Miller. He and a small team are en route to a big soccer conference in Miami, making stops along the way to show off the FUV to order holders and other interested parties.The controls are pretty simple and about what you’d expect. Quite similar to a motorcycle, it sports a twist throttle on the right handlebar, along with a forward-neutral-reverse gear selector switch. What one would typically take for a front-brake lever actually actuates the regenerative braking, which is quite strong. It can come to almost a complete stop using regen alone, or just be used to supplement the right-side foot brake. In practice, the foot pedal only came into play at stop signs.The left handlebar is home to the turn signals, horn, and light controls. The center console, which will be somewhat different in the final production version, has switchgear for the handlebar grip and seat warmers, the windshield wiper and parking brake.Rolling slowly on the throttle was a revelation. From a standstill, it eases softly into motion, belying the power that remains with further wrist twisting. The twin AC motors powering the front wheels sing the electric song of my people, increasing steadily in their pitch, syncing with the easy-to-read digital speedometer.The first slow turn reveals an ample amount of steering boost. Progressive, it makes easy work of low-speed maneuvers but firms up as the pace quickens. Later, I would drive the 2nd FUV the team has unloaded from the trailer which was an earlier build. That one had no steering assist and the difference was dramatic.Unfortunately, our route kept us on streets with 35 mile-an-hour speed limits, so I was unable to get a real sense of the machine’s manners at higher speeds. At this lower, in-town pace, everything feels plenty planted. Unlike riding a snowmobile or motorcycle, there is no need to lean into the turns. In this respect, it’s quite car-like.At these lower speeds, acceleration was impressive enough. It felt like you’d have no problem getting the jump on most cars at a traffic light. Although the initial hit isn’t too hard — it’s not engineered for the drag strip, after all — it pulls like an extremely motivated mule as momentum builds. Reading reports of other test drives, it seems people are even more impressed by its giddyup at higher speeds. The official 0-to-60 miles-per-hour figure is 7.5 seconds.Constrained by time, my turn hustling the FUV around the test route ended too soon. The team needed to hit the highway early in the afternoon and there were a number of prospective buyers also eagerly awaiting a turn. One lady had driven over four hours just for her chance to see the FUV in person and take a short test drive.I hung around to get an idea of what kind of crowd might be interested in this particular electric trike and found the mix to be quite eclectic. One retired couple thought it might be ideal for getting around their property; a young, professional husband and wife saw it as a replacement for one of their cars. Most were quite enthusiastic — more so after their drives.If all goes according to plan, plenty more people will have an even better opportunity to try this Fun Utility Vehicle for themselves. The company is pursuing a business model that would see the trikes available as rental vehicles at vacation destinations. The hope is that their experience would be positive enough for them to consider picking one up for their personal use back home. Arcimoto has already opened its first rental center in Eugene, Oregon. Its next location should be open soon in the San Diego, California area.This writer would certainly be quite happy to get some more FUV love. Already I’m daydreaming about the future possibility of renting one to explore the Florida Keys, a locale I think would be perfect for a rental center. Even without being able to legally reach it 80-mph top speed (the maximum limit there is 55 mph.), its open cabin allows you to fully embrace the entirety of the experience.The production version of the FUV should be revealed soon. We expect it to be pretty much the same, though with a couple more lights integrated into the fascia and more overall refinement. Then, the job of building and satisfying a few thousand existing orders begins.With its strong accent on the “Fun” part of its acronym, this three-wheeler should pull in plenty of buyers. It’s truly unlike anything else on the road today and definitely gets peoples attention as you pass them on the road. The base version starts at $11,900, and there are a number of options to help tailor it to your needs.Super-efficient, it comes with a 12-kWh battery said to offer 70 miles of range, but can be upgraded to a 130-mile pack. There are also optional enclosures (doors, basically), a storage box for the back, as well as bolt-on brackets to accommodate surfboard, bicycles, or golf bags. Arcimoto continues to accept refundable $100 deposits for pre-orders on its website. Meet The All Electric Arcimoto FUV Arcimoto Kicks Off Production Of Pilot Run Of Electric FUVlast_img read more

Electric Cars That Offer Various Advanced Safety Systems

first_img Electric Car Pros & Cons: What To Consider Before Buying Top 10 Most Common Electric Car Myths Busted Here’s a look at the latest life-saving crash avoidance technology and which EVs feature them as standard or optional equipment.With electric vehicles already being among the most technologically advanced rides on the road, it should come as no surprise that most offer an array of high-tech safety systems. Some will warn a motorist to react potential problems, while the best of them can actually take control of the braking and/or steering systems to prevent hitting another vehicle, or even pedestrians and bicyclists in a vehicle’s path.More EV Basics Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 1, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Utilizing a variety of sensors and cameras to monitor the road, such features provide the building blocks for tomorrow’s self-driving cars. They’re also the basis for semi-autonomous driving systems currently available in Tesla models and the Nissan Leaf.Here (in alphabetical order) is a quick overview at what are considered the most-essential crash warning and avoidance systems, and which electric vehicles currently offer them:Adaptive Cruise ControlThis high-tech twist on a familiar automotive technology represents a first step toward tomorrow’s fully autonomous cars. The system utilizes forward-looking sensors to maintain both a vehicle’s set speed and a chosen distance from the traffic ahead, automatically operating the throttle and brakes to slow down and speed up accordingly.Standard: Honda Clarity Electric, Hyundai Kona Electric, Kia Niro EV, Tesla Model 3, Tesla Model S, Tesla Model X.Optional: BMW i3, Hyundai Ioniq Electric, Jaguar i-Pace, Nissan Leaf, Volkswagen e-Golf.Blind-Spot WarningHere, sensors or cameras will trigger an alert if there’s another car to the side and rear of the vehicle the driver might not otherwise be able to see in a side mirror. Typically, a warning light illuminates at either side of the dashboard whenever another vehicle is in the motorist’s blind spot, and the system will issue an audible alarm if the driver engages the turn signal. Some will likewise issue an audible warning if there’s cross-traffic approaching when backing out of a garage or parking space. The Honda Clarity Electric features a LaneWatch system that provides a video view of the passenger’s side of the road whenever the right turn signal is engaged.Standard: Honda Clarity Electric (Honda LaneWatch), Hyundai Kona Electric, Kia Niro EV, Tesla Model 3, Tesla Model S, Tesla Model X.Optional: Chevrolet Bolt EV, Hyundai Ioniq Electric, Jaguar i-Pace, Nissan Leaf, Volkswagen e-Golf.Forward Collision Warning/Forward Auto-BrakingThis system uses sensors or cameras to monitor the distance between a vehicle and traffic or other obstructions in its path. Basic systems will engage an alert if it determines the car is closing in at a potentially hazardous rate of speed. More effective systems will automatically apply the brakes to avoid hitting another vehicle or obstruction (or at the least lessen its effects) if the driver isn’t reacting quickly enough. Most forward auto-braking systems operate at higher vehicle speeds with the intent of saving lives, though some vehicles also offer low-speed units that are designed to prevent “fender bender” crashes in stop-and-go traffic.Standard: Honda Clarity Electric, Hyundai Kona Electric, Kia Niro EV, Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model 3, Tesla Model S, Tesla Model X.Optional: BMW i3, Chevrolet Bolt EV, Hyundai Ioniq Electric, Jaguar i-Pace, Volkswagen e-Golf.Lane Departure WarningDesigned to keep a vehicle from inadvertently wandering into an adjacent lane, lane departure warning systems use cameras to monitor highway lane markers and will trigger an alert if the car is crossing them unless the turn signals are engaged. More advanced systems will use braking and/or steering intervention to help “nudge” a wandering car back into the center of a lane if its drifted onto or across the markers.Standard: Honda Clarity Electric, Tesla Model 3, Tesla Model S, Tesla Model X.Optional: Chevrolet Bolt EV, Hyundai Ioniq Electric, Nissan Leaf, Volkswagen e-Golf.Lane Keeping AssistSome models come a step closer to autonomous driving by making automatic steering adjustments to help keep a vehicle centered within highway lane markers or to prevent the vehicle from running off the road.Standard: Honda Clarity Electric, Hyundai Kona Electric, Jaguar i-Pace, Kia Niro EV, Tesla Model 3, Tesla Model S, Tesla Model X.Optional: Chevrolet Bolt EV, Hyundai Ioniq Electric, Nissan Leaf, Volkswagen e-Golf.Source: MYEV.com Here’s What You Need To Charge Your Electric Car At Homelast_img read more

Bafang Ultra electric bicycle motor offers over 1600 W of power massive

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Electric bicycles are growing increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and commuter use. Last year, just as many electric bicycles were sold as electric cars. And while e-bikes obviously have a cost advantage compared to electric cars, they also have another important advantage: extreme variety.There are hundreds, perhaps thousands of different e-bike models available at this point. With everything from inexpensive little 250 W e-bikes all the way up to pricy multi-kW bikes. And one of the most interesting and impressive additions to the high-power end of the spectrum has been the Bafang Ultra mid-drive electric motor. more…The post Bafang Ultra electric bicycle motor offers over 1,600 W of power & massive torque appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

PlugIn EV Car Market Share In Sweden Increased To 13 In January

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 15, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Rate of growth in Sweden accelerated to 53%Sweden is consistently striving to higher plug-in car market share, which in January amounted to roughly 13%.Passenger plug-in car registrations increased by 53% to 2,665, which is pretty awesome, especially when the general market again shrunk by 11%.Interestingly, all-electric car sales went up four times, while plug-in hybrids barely moved up by 2%.More sales reports Electric Car Sales In UK Doubled In January 2019: PHEVs Disappoint Source: Electric Vehicle News Plug-in electric car sales in SwedenMitsubishi Outlander PHEV (465) was the best selling model, but Kia Niro catches our attention with 285 PHEV and 175 EV.Source: EV Sales Blog French Plug-In EV Market Expanded By 62% In January 2019 Norway Begins 2019 With Strong Growth Of EV Saleslast_img read more

Watch BMW iNEXT iX3 i4 Undergo Trial Tests Video

first_imgIt is so cold that even the prototypes are snuggled closely next to each otherBMW released a short note about a trio of its upcoming all-electric cars, based on the fifth generation of BMW eDrive technology, that are currently being tested at the winter test center in Arjeplog in Sweden.Those three models are:Sports Activity Vehicle BMW iX3 scheduled for 2020four-door coupe BMW i4 scheduled for 2021Sports Activity Vehicle BMW iNEXT scheduled for 2021According to the latest press release, the range of those cars is to be from over 400 km (250 miles) to over 600 km (372 miles) under WLTP test cycle (see more below).BMW Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 31, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News BMW iX3BMW i4 – 2021The BMW i4 will be produced in Munich, Germany from 2021 and offer more than 600 km (372 miles) under WLTP test cycle.In terms of performance, 0-100 km/h (62 mph) takes just about 4 seconds. The top speed will be 200 km/h (124 mph).“The BMW i4 delivers locally emission-free driving pleasure combined with outstanding sportiness. The four-door coupe positioned in the premium midrange segment combines a dynamic design with inspiring performance and a high level of ride comfort. Fifth-generation BMW eDrive technology featured by the BMW i4 facilitates a range of over 600 kilometres*. Moreover, the electric motor’s spontaneous power development can be utilised above all to achieve a dynamic driving experience. The BMW i4 sprints from a standstill to 100 km/h in a mere 4 seconds and reaches a top speed of over 200 km/h. The BMW i4 will be produced at the BMW Munich plant starting 2021.” Source: Electric Vehicle News Here is what BMW wrote about tests at the edge of the Arctic Circle:“Within the framework of comprehensive vehicle testing, their drive and suspension components are being put to the test under extreme weather and road conditions. The testing area situated at the edge of the Arctic Circle provides the ideal requirements for this purpose. On the icy surfaces of frozen lakes, on snow and in the bitter cold, the electric motors, the high-voltage batteries and the power electronics of BMW eDrive technology as well as the suspension control systems are demonstrating their high level of performance and reliability.”BMW iX3 – 2020The iX3 is expected to have more than 400 km (250 miles) of WLTP range and capability of DC fast charging at 150 kW.The production for the global market will take place in Shenyang, China by BMW Brilliance Automotive Joint Venture.“The latest chapter of the BMW Group electrification strategy will be heralded by a Sports Activity Vehicle. Starting next year, the BMW iX3 will already feature the fifth generation of BMW eDrive technology for the first time. An exceptionally powerful electric motor and a high-voltage storage unit featuring state-of-the-art battery cell technology facilitate purely electric driving pleasure in a new dimension. With a range of over 400 kilometres* and the possibility to use DC charging stations with a capacity of 150 kW to charge its battery, the first all-electric SAV is ideally suitable for day-to-day use and long-distance travel. The BMW iX3 will be the first model produced for the entire global market by the BMW Brilliance Automotive Joint Venture at the Chinese production location in Shenyang.” BMW iNext Production SUV Spied Playing In The Snowcenter_img BMW i4BMW iNEXT – 2021BMW iNEXT will be equipped with Level 3 autonomous driving and offer over 600 km (372 miles) of WLTP range.Production will take place in Dingolfing, Germany plant from 2021.“With the proportions and dimensions of a luxury Sports Activity Vehicle, a fifth-generation electric drive unit and systems for highly automated driving, the BMW iNEXT embodies the future of driving pleasure in a particularly comprehensive way. As the BMW Group’s future modular construction system, it combines the latest innovations in the areas of design, automated driving, connectivity, electrification and services (D+ACES) defined by the NUMBER ONE > NEXT corporate strategy. BMW eDrive ensures a range exceeding 600 kilometres*. Furthermore, the car is equipped with the latest connectivity features and designed for Level 3 automated driving. The BMW Group’s new technology flagship will be produced at the BMW Dingolfing plant as from 2021.” More BMW iX3 Spy Shots Pop Up One Year Before Launch BMW iNEXT BMW i4 Spy Shots Capture Long-Range Electric Sedan In The Snowlast_img read more

Direct contact with lymphatic endothelial cells promotes melanoma metastasis

first_img Source:https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/health/lymphatic-endothelial-cells-promote-melanoma-to-spread May 2 2018Despite the declining death rates for many individual cancer types, mortality for a few cancers has stabilized or even increased. One of these is melanoma due to its ability, in later stages, to spread to other parts of the body. Melanoma is considered metastatic – also called Stage IV melanoma – when the cancer cells have spread through the lymph nodes to distant sites in the body, the most often affected being liver, lungs, bones and brain.Often primary melanomas grow and spread horizontally on the top layer of the skin before penetrating deeper into the layers of the dermis where they can reach the lymph and blood vessels. Lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis correlate with poor clinical outcome in melanoma.Related StoriesBU researchers identify biomarker and possible new therapy for melanomaPhysicians trained in dermatoscopy can improve odds for early detection of melanomaResearchers find possible counterpunch to drug resistance of melanomaIn addition to providing a direct route for dissemination, the lymph vessels have been proposed to directly modulate the metastatic process through mechanisms that have remained elusive.”Because the mechanisms and functional contribution of lymphatic dissemination in distant organ melanoma metastasis remain incompletely understood, we have investigated the contribution of the cells that form the walls of the lymphatic vessels, the lymphatic endothelial cells, to human melanoma cell invasion and metastasis”, tells Professor Päivi Ojala from the University of Helsinki, Finland. She continues:”In particular, our goal was to uncover the critical factors in the tumor lymphatic microenvironment that promote the melanoma cell distant organ metastasis and thereby to generate new leads and potential targets to more efficient treatments and prognosis for metastatic cancer.”Growing human melanoma cells in co-cultures with human primary lymphatic endothelial cells increased the invasive growth of melanoma cells in cell culture conditions that mimic the tissue environment and facilitated melanoma distant organ metastasis in mice implanted with human melanoma cells. This lymphatic endothelium mediated change in the melanoma was dependent on MMP14, Notch3 and ?1-integrin proteins, and MMP14 and Notch3 were necessary for the increased metastasis of human melanoma cells in a zebrafish tumor model.The study uncovers a unique mechanism whereby the direct contact with lymphatic endothelial cells promotes melanoma metastasis.”These findings can represent new leads that clinicians can consider as prognostic markers for metastasis and the pharmaceutical industry can pursue for further therapeutics development”, Professor Ojala says.last_img read more

Parenting concerns affect emotional wellbeing of mothers with latestage cancer

first_imgMay 7 2018Parenting concerns contributed significantly to the psychological distress of mothers with late-stage cancer, according to a study by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers.Cancer is the leading cause of disease-specific death for parenting-age women in the United States, and women with incurable cancer who have children can have increased rates of depression and anxiety. To better understand how parenting concerns might relate to the quality of life for this group, UNC Lineberger researchers surveyed 224 mothers with advanced cancer. They found that parenting concerns were significantly associated with lower quality of life – almost as much as declines in day-to-day physical functioning. The findings, published in the journal Cancer, point to a need for greater support for mothers with metastatic cancer, researchers say.”As part of cancer care, we ask about patients’ functional status, and how they are responding to treatment, but we are not systematically asking how cancer impacts our patients as parents, yet we know being a parent is incredibly important to their identity and well-being,” said UNC Lineberger’s Eliza M. Park, MD, assistant professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Department of Medicine. “Among women with metastatic cancer, their health-related quality of life is powerfully interlinked with their parenting concerns about the impact of their illness on their minor children. It appears to equally contribute to someone’s assessment of their quality of life as some of the clinical variables we routinely ask about.”In this study, Park and her colleagues conducted an online survey of women who had stage IV solid tumor cancer — cancer that had metastasized or spread elsewhere in the body — and at least one child under the age of 18 years. They found mothers with metastatic cancer had, on average, higher depression and anxiety scores than did the general population in the United States. Their emotional well-being scores also were lower than for all adults with cancer.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerThe researchers determined a mother’s emotional well-being was significantly linked with whether she had communicated with her children about her illness and her concerns about how her illness will financially impact her children.When they took into account other factors that may contribute to a mother’s lower quality of life, Park and her colleagues found parenting concerns made up 39 percent of the difference in the quality of life scores. This was almost the same impact on their quality of life score as the degree to which their illness was affecting their ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.”We found is that parenting-related factors contributed to the amount of variation you see in quality of life almost equally as something like your functional status,” Park said.Based on these findings, Park and her colleagues are planning to investigate ways to address some of the concerns patients with children have and to better support the parents.”We’re working to develop interventions for parents with advanced cancer or another serious illness to help them and their families adjust to the changes that occur with the diagnosis,” Park said. “Part of the strategy may be helping them to learn how to communicate effectively with their other family members as well as their children, identifying future care planning needs if their illness gets worse, and providing education about how families can cope and promote resilience in their children.” Source:http://unclineberger.org/last_img read more

Kessler Foundation scientists receive four grants to expand scope of research in

first_imgJun 12 2018The New Jersey Commission on Spinal Cord Injury Research has awarded four grants to scientists at Kessler Foundation. The grants, which exceed $1.5 million, fund diverse studies aimed at expanding knowledge of learning deficits after spinal cord injury, developing new tools for cognitive assessments, identifying types of neuropathic pain, and studying brain activity during exoskeleton-assisted walking. In May, the Commission announced a total of $3 million in grants to successful applicants from qualified research organizations in New Jersey.”These grants enable us to continue to expand the scope of our research in spinal cord injury,” said John DeLuca, PhD, senior vice president for Research and Training at Kessler Foundation. “We will look more deeply into secondary conditions that may be complicating recovery after spinal cord injury, such as cognitive deficits and neuropathic pain,” he explained, “and gather basic knowledge of the effect of exoskeleton-assisted walking on brain-muscle connections. The goal of these varied endeavors is the same – to translate our advances into improved rehabilitative care that enables individuals with spinal cord injury to participate fully at home, in their communities, and in the workplace.”Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyTwo individual research grants were awarded. Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, received a three-year grant for $557.782 for her study, “Examining behavioral and neural aspects of implicit procedural learning performance in individuals with spinal cord injury”. Dr. Chiaravalloti is director of Neuropsychology, Neuroscience and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Research, and project director of the Northern New Jersey TBI Model System. Jeanne Zanca, PhD, MPT, received a three-year grant for $595,446 for her proposed project, “Informing identification of neuropathic pain phenotypes in people with spinal cord injury.” Dr. Zanca is senior research scientist in Spinal Cord Injury Research, and an investigator with the Northern New Jersey Spinal Cord injury Model System.Two of the awards were exploratory research grants. Silvana L. Costa, PhD, received a two-year grant for $194,306 to study, “Using eye-tracker based cognitive assessments to examine cognitive functions in spinal cord injury”. Dr. Costa is associate research scientist in Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Research; her postdoctoral research was funded by a Switzer Research Fellowship, and the inaugural Hearst Foundation Fellowship. Soha Saleh, PhD, received a two-year grant for $199,998 for her pilot study on the use neuroimaging to study brain-muscle connectivity, “Cortical control of walking; brain plasticity following exoskeleton training in incomplete spinal cord injury. Dr. Saleh is a research scientist in Human Performance & Engineering Research.Source: http://www.kesslerfoundation.org/content/kessler-foundation-awarded-four-grants-nj-commission-spinal-cord-researchlast_img read more

MODELAD Center releases eight new mouse models for Alzheimers research

first_imgJul 23 2018The MODEL-AD Center, an ambitious project to develop and distribute precise mouse models of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD), has released eight new models carrying genetic mutations found in patients.In past decades, most AD researchers had to rely on mouse models that carried a genetic mutation associated with the relatively rare, early-onset, familial version of the disease. But at least 95 percent of the more than 5.4 million Alzheimer’s patients in the U.S. have the late-onset version of the disease, which has not yet been successfully modeled in mice.Enter MODEL-AD (which stands for Model Organism Development and Evaluation for Late-onset AD), a joint program of the Indiana University School of Medicine (IU), The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), Sage Bionetworks and the University of California, Irvine. MODEL-AD was launched in September 2016 by a five-year grant totaling $25 million from the National Institute on Aging, to address the critical lack of precision mouse models for late-onset AD.”This effort is all about creating and sharing the mouse and data resources and protocols that research, pharma and biotech need for preclinical AD drug development,” says Bruce Lamb, Ph.D., executive director of IU’s Stark Neurosciences Research Institute, a principal investigator of MODEL-AD and a member of the Alzheimer’s Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council.In addition to AD mouse model development, MODEL-AD is working to establish standardized and rigorous processes for the characterization and preclinical testing of animal models, and to align the pathophysiological features of AD models with corresponding stages of clinical disease using translatable biomarkers.Related StoriesStudy highlights the need for larger Alzheimer’s drug trials that intervene much earlierResearchers identify brain somatic mutations linked to Alzheimer’s diseaseAntioxidant protecting the brain linked to deterioration in areas susceptible to Alzheimer’s”MODEL-AD would not have been possible even five years ago,” says JAX Research Scientist Michael Sasner, Ph.D. “Patient genetic testing, now commonplace, has generated massive databases to mine for gene variants associated with late-onset AD. CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables us to quickly create new mouse models with precise genetic mutations — even multiple mutations in a single mouse. And we now have a wide range of -omics, biomarker, and imaging technologies to evaluate how well a given mouse models late-onset AD.”The project’s leaders expect to create more than 40 new mouse models based on human data sets, screen more than 24 models including deep phenotyping of at least eight new models, and establish a preclinical testing pipeline.MODEL-AD has already created and made available models with humanized mutations in the strongest genetic risk factors for late-onset AD, including APOE ε4 and Trem2.The new mouse models express variants at genetic loci that have been associated with late-onset AD, but have not yet been proven to be causative: ABCA7, CEACAM1, IL1RAP and PLCG2. These have been created on an APOEε4 and mutant Trem2 genetic background, to increase the chances of demonstrating Alzheimer’s-like characteristics. The animals are being made available immediately to the worldwide scientific community, to expedite new research efforts. Source:https://www.jax.orglast_img read more

New study demonstrates tissue regenerative potential of chemoattractant delivery system

first_img Source:https://home.liebertpub.com/news/researchers-identify-factor-to-enhance-mesenchymal-stem-cell-and-collagen-ii-activity-in-intervertebral-disc-degeneration/2418 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 5 2018A new study has demonstrated the tissue regenerative potential of a chemoattractant delivery system that can draw mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the site of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The study, carried out in a cow model of IVD degeneration, not only showed the recruitment of regenerative cells, but also reported increased collagen production, as described in an article published in Tissue Engineering, Part A, peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.Related StoriesMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsSlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthRaquel Madeira Gonçalves, PhD, Universidade do Porto, Portugal and a team of researchers from Universidade do Porto and the AO Research Institute Davos, Switzerland, described the hyaluronan based-chemoattractant delivery system they developed in the article entitled “Stromal Cell Derived Factor-1-Mediated Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Collagen Type II Expression in Intervertebral Disc.” In the presence of the system, which contained stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), migration of MSCs to the degenerative site was enhanced. In addition, the researchers measured higher levels of collagen type II and of pro-catabolic factors produced by the MSCs that would contribute to enhanced remodeling of the extracellular matrix.”This study exemplifies the impact of drug delivery on enhancing a specific cellular activity and thus reverting a tissue degenerative process,” says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX.last_img read more

A geomagnetic storm is coming—should I worry

first_imgThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is forecasting a moderate to strong geomagnetic storm to occur sometime later today or tonight, U.S. Eastern time. What does that mean? Will it knock out power grids? Will there be a lot of radiation? Your questions, answered.Q: What causes a geomagnetic storm?A: The sun is now just about at the peak of its 11-year solar cycle, meaning that there are a significant number of sunspots visible. Sunspots look like dark freckles on the sun, but they’re actually regions of intense magnetic activity. Clusters of these sunspots can be sources of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), sudden bursts of energized particles that swiftly stream out from the surface of the sun. The largest type of these is called an X-class flare. If an X-class flare is powerful enough and aimed directly at Earth, it can cause radiation storms in Earth’s ionosphere and wreak havoc with radio communications. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Q: So what’s happening today?A: According to Thomas Berger, the director of SWPC in Boulder, Colorado, there were two back-to-back CMEs from the sun earlier this week, the second of which produced an X-class flare yesterday at about 1:45 p.m. It’s expected to reach Earth later this morning or early afternoon.Berger noted yesterday at a NOAA press conference that this X-class flare is not expected to produce a particularly large event, as these things go; there are perhaps 100 to 200 of this size of geomagnetic storm in a given solar cycle. (This one’s rated a G3, on a scale of 1 to 5.) “It’s expected to be manageable and not cause any major interruptions to power transmission,” he said. But he added that space weather scientists are paying closer attention to this event than might otherwise be warranted because two back-to-back CME events, both directed at Earth, is a bit more unusual, and because it’s possible that the two could interact on their way to Earth. The second, more powerful event is also traveling faster than the first and could overtake it (although current models suggest it won’t).Q: Should people flying in planes today worry about radiation?A: No. There are different types of space weather—geomagnetic storms, which affect communications, and solar radiation storms. Although this is expected to be a G3-level geomagnetic storm, it’ll only be an S1 solar radiation storm. Airlines (and astronauts) have procedures in place for storms level S3 and above. Q: What about aurorae? Will we see pretty lights?A: Maybe! You need clear skies, but it’s possible that if you’re far north enough you’ll see aurorae tonight. For example, in the United States, Berger said, for a storm this size, it could be visible at night along the northern tier states bordering Canada, but it’s unlikely to be visible farther south. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Singlemolecule Tetris allows scientists to observe DNA at the nanoscale

first_imgPhysicists are using a technique reminiscent of a classic video game to observe DNA on the nanoscale. They call it “single-molecule Tetris.” The approach consists of a device filled with tiny channels and cavities that DNA molecules can move in and out of, resulting in some of the familiar Tetris shapes, like the “L,” the square, and the zigzag (illustrated above: a DNA molecule, in red, occupies four cavities in a zigzag). As the chainlike molecules bend or jump into different shapes, researchers use that information to measure two very specific characteristics of DNA molecules—the width and the confined free energy, or entropy of the molecule. Here, entropy relates to how many ways the energy of the molecule can be arranged. Physically, it correlates to the different shapes the molecule can take while maintaining the same distance between its two ends. Scientists collected data, published this month in Macromolecules, on these parameters to show the precise conditions under which DNA can be trapped in the cavities. It’s a feat that’s extremely difficult to do on such a minute scale, but thanks to single-molecule Tetris, these physicists now have results that could help biologists improve genome sequencing and tease out valuable genetic information from these tiny, confined bits of DNA.last_img read more

After 40 years the most important weapon against mosquitoes may be failing

first_img Another combination net is already on the market, but it’s not widely used because its efficacy is still in doubt. The net combines pyrethroids with a chemical called piperonyl butoxide (PBO). PBO blocks enzymes that help resistant mosquitoes break down pyrethroids, so, in theory, the mosquitoes should become susceptible again. Small-scale studies have suggested that the nets do work, but there haven’t been any large-scale clinical trials.To find new compounds for spraying and nets, IVCC has partnered with several large chemical companies including BASF, Syngenta, and Sumitomo to screen more than 4 million compounds in their libraries. Over the next few months they will choose three to go into large-scale toxicology testing, Hamon says. Any candidates for bed nets will have to pass other demanding tests: In addition to being safe, they will have to survive at least 20 washes and perform well for 3 years. “We were just very lucky with the pyrethroid insecticides in the ’70s and ’80s,” Hamon says. Finding replacement insecticides for bed nets is far trickier. Any insecticide used in a bed net “has to be safe enough that a child can put it in their mouth,” says Ranson, and only pyrethroids fit the bill. Pyrethroids also have a trait scientists call excito-repellency: They stimulate mosquitoes to leave the net. Neither SumiShield nor chlorfenapyr does that.Not only are bed nets the best weapon in the fight against malaria-carrying mosquitoes, in many countries they are the only one. “Some countries still don’t have IRS as part of their program. They view it as too expensive and difficult to implement,” Ranson says.From 2011 to 2016, Ranson headed an EU-funded project called AvecNet to evaluate new weapons to fight mosquitoes and take one through a clinical trial. The researchers eventually chose a net that combines pyrethroids with a compound called pyriproxyfen, which prevents mosquitoes from producing fertile eggs. “The idea is that if the mosquitoes are fully susceptible they will be killed by the insecticide, and if they are resistant they will pick up a dose of the sterilizing agent and the population will crash as well,” Ranson says. The group began testing the nets in 40 clusters of villages in Burkina Faso in 2014; results of the trial should be known in a few weeks. “There is a lot riding on this,” Ranson says. “If it doesn’t show any improvement, then I doubt there will be any further clinical trials of it.” Related Article Brazil will release billions of lab-grown mosquitoes to combat infectious disease. Will it work? Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country ​Pyrethroids have played an outsize role in the global fight against malaria in the last decades. They are the main compounds used to spray the inside walls of homes—so-called indoor residual spraying, or IRS—to kill the Anopheles mosquitoes that transmit the disease. And they are the only insecticides that can be used on bed nets. Much of the global success in fighting malaria has come from these two interventions. In a Nature paper last year, a group led by Simon Hay at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom estimated that between 2000 and 2015, some 633 million malaria deaths were averted, with 68% of that decline due to insecticide-treated bed nets and 10% to IRS. (Treating people with antimalarial drugs accounted for the remaining 22%.) Pyrethroids have also played a role in the fight against Aedes aegypti, the main mosquito transmitting the yellow fever, dengue, and Zika viruses, even though bed nets are less effective against A. aegypti because it predominantly bites people outdoors and during the day. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Malaria mosquitoes that are resistant to pyrethroids have spread across Africa in recent years, stoking fears that malaria cases will rise again. By Kai KupferschmidtOct. 13, 2016 , 9:00 AM John Cairns Luck may not run out quite as fast as many fear. Although resistance to pyrethroids is widespread, its impact on public health is still unclear. Even though a mosquito may survive a dose of an insecticide, the chemical may weaken it in some way. And the genes needed for resistance may take their own toll, perhaps by shortening a mosquito’s life span. If the insect survives for fewer than 14 days, the malaria parasites won’t have enough time to mature to the stage where they can infect humans, says Matthew Thomas, an entomologist at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. “There is some evidence to show that things like that can happen,” Thomas says.Insecticide resistance is going to matter at a certain point, he says—”What we don’t know is whether we are just approaching that point, whether it is 1 year away, or five or 10.” Defeating diseases like malaria may depend not only on finding chemicals to kill mosquitoes, but also on understanding how the insects manage to survive them. Related Article This scientist is the ultimate mosquito killer Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images center_img Nor has there been much incentive for companies to develop new mosquito-killing insecticides, which could be used in tandem with existing ones to slow the development of resistance. Most R&D has focused on agricultural chemicals, a far more lucrative market. “No publicly traded company is going to spend the money required to discover and develop and take to the market an insecticide for public health,” says Nick Hamon, who heads the Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC) in Liverpool. “These companies are looking for $100 million in sales every year to have any chance of recouping the money for a new compound.”First detected in Ivory Coast in 1993, resistance to pyrethroids was relatively rare until about 10 years ago, when it began racing across the continent (see map above). “Some countries are seeing an increase in malaria transmission, and resistance is one of the probable causes,” Coetzee says. It’s hard to be sure, she says, because drug shortages or cutbacks of control programs may also be taking a toll. But Hilary Ranson of LSTM thinks the problem is real and will only get worse. “I think insecticide resistance is a time bomb.”Many scientists have their hopes pinned on new approaches to vector control that would be less likely to run into resistance or prove toxic, such as mosquitoes genetically modified to die young, traps that lure the insects to their death, or insecticidal bacteria or fungi. “We need to diversify in terms of the kind of tools that we use to control mosquitoes and not focus it entirely on chemical control,” says Willem Takken, a medical entomologist at Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands. But Hemingway and other scientists caution that even if these new tools prove their mettle, they are years away at best. The first priority, Hemingway says, is to preserve and improve the tools we know work. And to her, that means insecticides.That’s why, in 2005, Hemingway started IVCC, a public-private partnership that aims to develop entirely new classes of insecticides and get them on the market in 5 to 8 years. Since IVCC’s inception, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has kicked in more than $200 million, and the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Wellcome Trust, and others have each contributed millions. In the meantime, IVCC is scrambling to help scientists find smarter ways to use existing insecticides or combine them with other interventions in a way that keeps resistance at bay. John Cairns Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Janet Hemingway, head of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. Resistance movement After 40 years, the most important weapon against mosquitoes may be failing With IRS, one option is to switch to an insecticide from one of the other available classes: organochlorides, carbamates, and organophosphates. South Africa went back to using DDT, an organochloride, after an epidemic of malaria transmitted by pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes in 1999 and 2000. But many other countries avoid the insecticide—and not just for environmental reasons. DDT and pyrethroids also work through a very similar mechanism, so some mosquitoes resistant to pyrethroids are also resistant to DDT.Some countries have switched from pyrethroids to an organophosphate insecticide called actellic. But actellic is four times as expensive, Hemingway says. “Fewer houses are getting sprayed, because the money available hasn’t increased fourfold.” And with many countries switching to the same compound, there is a danger that resistance will emerge to it as well.Two new mosquito killers could be on the market as soon as 2017: SumiShield, developed by Japanese company Sumitomo Chemical, and chlorfenapyr, an insecticide mostly used to control cat fleas, developed by BASF. But both are seen as stopgap measures. Although they are new to public health, these compounds have been used in agriculture for years, so some mosquitoes may be resistant already. And SumiShield is a neonicotinoid, a class of compounds that faces public opposition because it has been implicated in the mass die-off of pollinators. Pyrethroids have several distinct advantages: They kill mosquitoes efficiently, act rapidly, and, although toxic, are safer for humans than the alternatives. But when the massive rollout of insecticide-treated bed nets began in Africa in the early 2000s—more than a billion have been distributed—little thought was given to resistance, says Maureen Coetzee, director of the Wits Research Institute for Malaria at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. “Nobody dreamt that insecticide resistance would spread the way it has spread throughout Africa.”Scientists shouldn’t have been surprised, however. An earlier insecticide, DDT, played a major role in driving down malaria cases starting in the 1940s. But in many places, resistance reversed those gains. In Sri Lanka, for instance, malaria was all but wiped out with the help of DDT, but by the end of the 1960s, when resistance was widespread, cases surged to more than half a million a year. By that time, Rachel Carson had highlighted the toxic effects of DDT in Silent Spring, and many nations banned its use. When Janet Hemingway started her career in mosquito research in 1977, a child was dying of malaria every 10 seconds. Yet the disease, and the mosquitoes that carry it, were low on the global health priority list.Today, the landscape has been transformed. Scientists at the prestigious Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) in the United Kingdom, which Hemingway now heads, and elsewhere have sequenced the genomes of at least 23 mosquito species, looking for clues that might help them conquer the disease. And malaria has surged to the top of the global agenda. Thanks to a bolus of new funds, deaths have been halved. And halved again.But one thing hasn’t changed. The world still relies on the same class of insecticides, known as pyrethroids, as it did in 1977. Now, in part because of that neglect, these compounds may be nearing the end of their useful lives as mosquitoes develop resistance to them at alarming rates, and there is little in the pipeline to replace them. “If we don’t do something about this very quickly, we have a public health catastrophe on our hands,” Hemingway says. To evaluate the efficacy of indoor residual spraying against malaria, scientists place a piece of tape on the wall, pull it off, and then soak it in a chemical solution to see how much pyrethroid insecticide was applied. A fogging machine is tested at Jones Beach in New York in 1945. Mass spraying of DDT led mosquitoes to develop resistance. last_img read more

Top stories Chasing a cancer blood test and how a Mormon lawyer

first_img Top stories: Chasing a cancer blood test, and how a Mormon lawyer transformed archaeology in Mexico By Roni DenglerJan. 19, 2018 , 2:45 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Scientists, universities, funding agencies, and journals alike should be doing much more to ensure the reproducibility of scientific research, according to a report released this week by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. The group makes a number of recommendations, including teaching scientists how to conduct replication studies. The new report adds to a growing number of voices calling for fundamental changes in the way science is conducted and published.One of history’s worst epidemics may have been caused by a common microbeThe Aztecs called it pestilence. Victims turned yellow from jaundice and blood ran from their ears and noses. They had hallucinations and agonizing convulsions, and they died in days. But even today, nobody knows exactly what caused an epidemic that first appeared in 16th century Mexico. Now, new DNA evidence published this week suggests the culprit might have been salmonella—a common food-borne illness—brought by European colonizers.No more pancake syrup? Climate change could bring an end to sugar maplesSavor that sticky, slightly nutty sweetness drenching your Sunday morning pancakes now. The trees that make maple syrup will struggle to survive climate change, a new study reveals. Researchers thought pollution might buffer sugar maples against an increasingly warm climate by supplying soils with fertilizing nitrogen. But the new analysis finds that the extra boost of nitrogen won’t be enough. Researchers say sugar maples will eventually disappear if current climate conditions continue.How a Mormon lawyer transformed archaeology in Mexico—and ended up losing his faithIn 1948, a Mormon lawyer went looking in the jungles of Campeche in Mexico, for the place where Jesus appeared—according to the Book of Mormon—after rising from the dead. What he found were ancient ruins, an understudied cultural crossroads, and a new window on Mesoamerica’s past. But, as he and the archaeological expeditions he inspired unearthed traces of the region’s earliest complex societies, proof for his beliefs eluded him. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email (left to right): TON KOENE/PICTURE-ALLIANCE/DPA/AP IMAGES; CHRISTINA WARINNER. IMAGE COURTESY OF THE TEPOSCOLULA-YUCUNDAA ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROJECT; LIZZIE WADE ‘Liquid biopsy’ promises early detection for cancerScientists have gotten one step closer to a universal blood test for the early detection of cancer. The new test, which examines cancer-related DNA and proteins in the blood, yielded a positive result about 70% of the time across eight common cancer types in more than 1000 patients whose tumors had not yet spread. The work could one day lead to a tool for routinely screening people and catching tumors when chances are best for a cure.Make replication studies ‘a normal and essential part of science,’ Dutch science academy sayslast_img read more