NHS outofhours services being run without a single doctor with some turning

first_imgExperts said patients were being put at risk by a scarcity of family doctors Credit:Alamy Experts said patients were being put at risk by a scarcity of family doctors  The national shortages have contributed to lengthening waiting times to see a doctor and a sharp rise in the number of practices refusing to take new patients. Official figures show the number of patients waiting at least a week to see a GP has risen by one third in three years, with more than 14 million patients waiting a week to get an appointment, or giving up, in 2015.Last week plans for a national ‘Uber– style’ system of private GP appointments using NHS doctors prompted a backlash from some medics.The new service will match patients who are prepared to pay up to £70 for an appointment with GPs working in NHS practices in their spare time. It came days after figures showed a rise in average earnings for GP partners, with 15,000 doctors earning more than £100,000 a year. A Department of Health spokesperson said: “This Government is committed to making sure that patients get the right care at the right time from well-resourced GPs as part of our commitment to a seven-day NHS. “”Total investment in general practice in England rose to over £9bn in the last year; an increase of almost 5% from 2014/15. We have also backed NHS England’s GP Forward View with a further £2.4 billion a year by 2020/21, which will be used to support general practice, including increasing GP numbers, reducing pressure on staff and retaining a healthy GP workforce well into the future.” NHS out-of-hours services are being run without a single doctor in some parts of the country, as other practices turn to refugee medics to plug desperate shortages of GPs.Experts said patients were being put at risk by a scarcity of family doctors, which could result in up to 600 practices closing their doors by 2020.The growing crisis means parts of Yorkshire covering up to 300,000 patients have been left without any doctor to send out at night, an investigation found. Senior doctors said the situation was “appalling” and in need of urgent action, with patients left in danger by “poor quality, unsafe care”.NHS leaders in Cumbria are drawing up plans to recruit refugee doctors, amid warnings that the state of local GP services has become “very fragile”.Forecasts suggest that on current trends, Britain will face a shortfall of almost 10,000 GPs within four years. Rising numbers of family doctors are retiring early, partly fuelled by Treasury rules which have increased tax rates for those with pension pots worth more than £1 million.Meanwhile, the number of trainee doctors choosing to become GPs is falling far short of demand, as waiting lists to get an appointment rise.In Yorkshire, NHS Doncaster clinical commissioning group admitted that its out-of-hours services had been operating without a single GP to treat patients who fell sick overnight.FCMS, which provides cover for a population of 300,000 people in south Yorkshire, said that on eight occasions during August it had no GP present.On six of the instances a doctor was available by phone, while on two occasions, including an eight-hour overnight shift, there was simply no doctor available at all, the firm admitted.center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. In Glasgow, out-of-hours services have been closed at short notice, during the summer period, after health managers were unable to find GPs to work shifts.An NHS Glasgow spokesman said: “Despite the assistance we get from GPs, including the support of many who come in at short notice, we have had to make short notice closures of centres when we do not have GP cover.”Health service managers in Cumbria are drawing up plans to recruit refugee doctors to work as local GPs. The proposals to employ foreign doctors granted asylum status, follow NHS research warning that general practice in the region is “very fragile,” with 47 per cent of GP partners planning to retire within a decade.The area is among several offering trainee GPs “golden hellos” of £20,000 on top of their salaries, in a bid to fill gaps.Dr Geoff Jolliffe, interim clinical chairman of NHS Cumbria CCG and a GP in Barrow, said: ‘If there are competent people who can speak English and are properly trained and can pass our procedures then I think that is a valid thing to do, but I don’t think it will solve our problems.“The long-term solution will be to understand what attracts people and redesign the job accordingly.”An NHS spokesman said the plans, which could also lead to the recruitment of ex-forces doctors, were not formal proposals, and were part of schemes which would go to public consultation.Rising numbers of family doctors are retiring early, with average retirement age dropping to 59 by last year.  One in three GPs surveyed last year said they intended to retire in the next five years. A spokesman said the problem was exacerbated by a lack of doctors, market forces pushing up locum rates for doctors, and changes in tax rules.Dr Dean Eggitt, medical secretary for Doncaster’s local medical committee, said the system was not safe.“It is an appalling situation that they are running an out-of-hours service that is supposed to be GP-led, subcontracted to GPs, without GPs,” he told Pulse magazine.“This is NHS care on a shoestring budget, cutting corners and only doing what you can afford – which is poor quality, unsafe care.”He urged regulators to examine the matter, in order to protect patient safety.last_img read more

Lonely Generation Rent do not feel part of their communities ONS finds

first_img“A given renter is more likely to be newer to the area than a homeowner, so they won’t have those local connections and they won’t have relationships with other people in the local area. “That reflects both the flexibility of the rented sector and the lack of security, which creates this churn, because of rents going up and landlords taking back their property, or ending a tenancy early. “People are likely to be caught up in that and finding themselves in a new home and a new neighbourhood with people, often sharing with people they don’t know very well. That all adds up to it being quite isolating.”He said plans to explore incentives for longer tenancies, which were announced by Chancellor Philip Hammond in last year’s autumn Budget, could help fix the problem. Figures published earlier this year by think-tank the Institute of Fiscal Studies found that just one in four of those born in the late 1980s owned their own home at 27, compared with one in three born in the early 1980s and 43 per cent of those born a decade earlier. Women felt lonely more often than men, with just over half saying they felt lonely occasionally or more often, compared to 40 per cent of men.  Being unable to get onto the housing ladder is creating a generation of lonely young people who do not feel part of their communities, an Office for National Statistics report has found. The ONS identified “younger renters with little trust and sense of belonging to their area” as a group with a high risk of loneliness. It said this group, aged between 16 and 34, had little trust in their neighbours and did not have a strong sense of belonging in the area where they lived. Just one in four said “many” of the people they shared their neighbourhood with could be trusted, compared with an overall average of 45 per cent, while 55 per cent said they belonged in their neighbourhood “not very strongly” or “not at all”, compared with 38 per cent overall. Of the people in this group, 61 per cent said they felt lonely occasionally, or more often, compared with 46 per cent overall. Almost one in ten renters reported feeling lonely often or always, compared to less than four per cent of homeowners. Dan Wilson-Craw, of Generation Rent, which campaigns on behalf of renters, said: “This is what we’d expect from a rented sector where renters are moving frequently. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Being single or widowed was also a risk factor, with the least lonely group named as married homeowners, in good health, who were living with others.  Experts also called for more support to help people form stable relationships.Chris Sherwood, chief executive at charity Relate said: “Although being in a relationship is not a guarantee against loneliness, the statistics indicate that people living alone are at greater risk.  “This suggests that supporting couple relationships and reducing relationship breakdown should form a key part of the government’s approach to preventing loneliness.”The figures suggested that financial insecurity and poor health are major drivers of loneliness, with another high-risk group identified as unmarried, middle-aged people with a long-term health condition, who were more likely than average to be renting, disabled and unemployed.  Also at risk were widowed people aged over 65, who were likely to be homeowners, living alone and coping with a long-term health condition. last_img read more

Army sergeant guilty of trying to murder his wife by tampering with

But in an unprecedented incident, her reserve parachute then failed.Two slinks were missing, meaning that the main lines on one side of the canopy were not connected to her harness, with a brake cable the only thing attached on that side.This caused the reserve to not inflate properly and led to her spiralling out of control and at high speed to the ground.Describing the final moments of her rapid descent, Mrs Cilliers, 42, said: “The last thing I remember is trying to get some kind of control over it, trying to open as many cells as I could – then everything went black. I do not know if it was the G force or the impact but everything cut out.” The missing slinks from Mrs Cilliers’ parachute were never found and the prosecution case was that the defendant had taken them out and disposed of them.Soft patch of ploughed field saved wife’s lifeA soft patch of newly-ploughed field was the only thing that saved the life of Victoria Cilliers after her near-fatal fall.On Easter Sunday, April 5, 2015, the highly-experienced parachutist made a routine recreational jump at Netheravon Airfield in Wiltshire.As she jumped from the aircraft, first of all her main parachute malfunctioned.A rare but not unheard of problem had occurred where her lines were twisted, and she followed her training and cut away the canopy of the main parachute. She also cast doubt on whether or not he had tried to cause a gas leak at their home days before the parachute jump. Wanting to expand his knowledge, he enrolled in an advanced course in packing reserve parachutes.The trial jury learned that reserve parachutes, which are rarely deployed, are required to be checked and repacked every six months.Cilliers attended a course at Netheravon in October 2012 run by chief rigger of the Army Parachute Association George Panagopoulos.He described the defendant as a “very good, confident” packer who “became good and pretty quick and efficient”.The trial was told that Cilliers had a short window of opportunity to tamper with his wife’s parachute in the hangar toilets at Netheravon. The humiliated mother of his two youngest children should have been the prosecution’s star witness.A highly-experienced parachuting instructor, she suffered near-fatal injuries when both her main and reserve parachutes failed as she jumped from a Cessna Caravan Light aircraft at the Army Parachute Association at Netheravon, Wiltshire, on Easter Sunday, April 5, 2015.She immediately knew something was wrong and cut the main parachute away. But the reserve was all twisted and she spiralled helplessly to the ground.One expert said it was the most tangled and knotted parachute he had ever seen after a malfunction.Two of four vital components called slinks, which help keep the canopy lines attached to the harness, were missing.Cilliers, who served with the Royal Army Physical Training Corps, was described as being of “quite exceptional callousness,” someone who would “stop at nothing to satisfy his own desires, material or otherwise.”He certainly made no attempt to hide his contempt for his wife.As she lay on her hospital bed, having miraculously survived the 4,000ft fall, he could barely bring himself to acknowledge her, choosing instead to send lewd texts to his Austrian lover, Stefanie Goller. The gas valve, circled, which Cilliers tampered with Chief instructor Mark Bayada was tasked with replicating the actions that Cilliers was accused of within the confines of a toilet cubicle and he managed this in slightly over five minutes.This involved taking out the main parachute container and turning it around in order to twist the lines so that it would malfunction on the jump.He secondly removed vital parts from the reserve parachute – two slinks, a nylon link which connects the harness to the canopy.The court was told that only two slinks had ever failed and these had been in badly maintained main parachutes but never in a reserve.The court was told that a main and reserve parachute had not failed together worldwide. She was the key witness and the case hinged on her account. Cilliers had told his wife he was going to spend the night at his barracks in order to avoid Monday morning traffic.Before he left, he loosened a nut on a gas isolation valve in a cupboard next to the oven.But the plan to kill her in a massive explosion failed when, after texting him to say she could smell gas, she declined to turn on the oven as he suggested.The court heard that Cilliers’ blood was found on the valve and that forensic evidence proved it had been loosened with his mole grip.But Mrs Cilliers explained her husband had cut himself a few days earlier while preparing food and entered the cupboard where the gas valve is to fetch food.She denied she was attempting to help her husband.Following his conviction, Detective Inspector Paul Franklin of Wiltshire Police, said: “The real danger with Emile Cilliers is he is cold, calculated, deliberate, and done for financial and sexual motives, and there was absolutely no consideration of his wife or anyone else, he serves his own needs and that makes him a very dangerous man.”Describing the impact on Mrs Cilliers, Mr Franklin said: “I don’t think we can underestimate the ordeal that she has been put through. Victoria Cilliers arrives at Winchester Crown Court on May 1Credit:Morten Watkins/Solent Emile Cilliers was desperate to get rid of his wife.The “cold and calculating” Army sergeant was in the throws of a passionate affair with a woman he met on Tinder, sleeping with his ex-wife and had various prostitutes on speed dial.His debts had spiralled out of control and he was of the mistaken belief that if Victoria Cilliers died, he would receive £120,000 in life insurance.When he had tried to tell her he wanted to end the marriage she threatened suicide so he decided on a more sinister option, first trying to cause a gas explosion at the family home in Amesbury, Wilts, and then, when that failed, sabotaging her parachute after organising a skydive as a “treat”.The “very dangerous, coercive and manipulative” physical training instructor showed no emotion as he was convicted on Thursday of two counts of attempted murder and a third count of damaging the gas fitting recklessly endangering life following a retrial at Winchester Crown Court.But despite the overwhelming evidence, South African-born Cilliers, 38, almost got away with it, thanks largely to his wife. Emile Cilliers and his wife Victoria Victoria Cilliers arrives at Winchester Crown Court on May 1 Her survival has been described as a “near-miracle” and the only reason she did not suffer fatal injuries was the soft soil of the ploughed field where she landed.Her light weight was also attributed as a factor in helping to minimise her injuries.But her final piece of luck was that the spot where she landed was just 16ft (5m) from a small country lane, which would undoubtedly have caused fatal injuries. How did Cilliers do it?Army sergeant Emile Cilliers used his extensive knowledge of packing parachutes to sabotage his wife’s device.The 38-year-old took up the sport after meeting his future wife, Victoria, who has been described as one of the best parachutists in the country.He went on to become an experienced packer at Netheravon Airfield, where he would pack hundreds of main parachutes. Victoria Cilliers A view of the gentlemen's toilets at Netheravon Airfield in Wiltshire Victoria Cilliers But the original jury was unable to reach a verdict after she took to the stand and gave a vastly contradictory version of events to that she had given to police.She claimed she had “lied” to officers because she wanted to make him suffer and had exaggerated her story.”During statements I was angry, very angry. I was out for blood,” she said.”I made it sound worse than it was.”I didn’t always tell the truth, no. I got to the point where the extent of his lies and deceit had been disclosed to me and I wanted to get my own back.”Midway through the six-week trial, Mrs Cilliers was declared a “hostile” witness following an application by the prosecution, allowing them to cross examine her and cast doubt on her evidence.Mrs Cilliers had originally told police Cilliers had disappeared into the lavatory with her parachute, where he removed the vital metal slinks, for between two and five minutes.Later, she claimed he had actually disappeared for up to ten minutes.In her first police interview she described her husband as “awesome” but days later, “painted him as the devil”. A view of the gentlemen’s toilets at Netheravon Airfield in WiltshireCredit:Steve Parsons/PA The gas valve, circled, which Cilliers tampered with Emile Cilliers and his wife Victoria Mrs Cilliers, 42, inexplicably and to the shock of everyone in court, threw his first trial into chaos when she appeared to defend his behaviour, telling the jury she had lied to the police and exaggerated her evidence. “Physically she is well but obviously she is still traumatised.”Hannah Squire, junior counsel for the prosecution, said: “The jury heard details of his coercive behaviour towards his wife and his continued manipulation of all the women in his life to satisfy his own desires, whether financial or sexual.”He showed complete and utter contempt for his wife and this culminated in his desire to have her dead, whether that be to start a new life with his lover Stefanie Goller, benefit financially from the death of Victoria Cilliers, or both.”Mr Justice Sweeney remanded Cilliers in custody until sentencing on June 15, and asked for a probation report to be prepared on his “dangerousness”.The court heard he would be kicked out of the “Army within seven days”. The Ministry of defence declined to comment.WATCH: Clip appears to show Victoria Cilliers moments before near-fatal jump Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Father stockpiled weapons and plotted revenge on police and judge who took

Ebrahimi targeted police officers and a judge after he became obsessed with “limitless revenge” against authority figuresCredit:West Yorkshire Police/PA Ebrahimi targeted police officers and a judge after he became obsessed with "limitless revenge" against authority figures A police spokesman said: “The effects of this action sowed the seeds of a deep hatred of the police that grew exponentially from that moment.”He believed that the police were committed to destroying his life and set about seeking to take extreme violent action against them.” “He developed a deep-seated and consuming hatred and loathing for people in authority, in the main police officers, and set about research and planning his limitless revenge against them.”Mr Stevenson said: “The volume of weapons, substances and associated material recovered from his property were to enable him to commit the most serious harm to others and I strongly believe that he would have eventually executed his plans in harming a police officer on the streets of West Yorkshire.” Ebrahimi had 90 videos saved that related to the creation of explosives, fuses, detonators and gunpowder.Detective Chief Inspector Warren Stevenson said: “Ebrahimi is a very dangerous individual who posed a significant and very serious threat to police officers, police staff, solicitors and the judiciary. Ebrahimi amassed chemicals and weapons including swords, crossbows and air riflesCredit:West Yorkshire Police/PA His home was raided and officers found a book detailing 21 vehicle registration plates of cars belonging to people he was interested in and photographs of their addresses.His sat-nav revealed that he had visited the address of the judge who issued the non-molestation order and of a police chief inspector.The full home addresses were also found of other police officers he had encountered as well as that of the solicitor working on behalf of his ex-partner.Police also found he had researched the use and effects of chemicals, how police officers are protected when not at work and sophisticated surveillance equipment.A large amount of chemicals were also recovered from Ebrahimi’s address, along with an extensive collection of weapons including knives, swords, crossbows and high-powered air rifles, the spokesman said. Ebrahimi amassed chemicals and weapons including swords, crossbows and air rifles He said Ebrahimi was arrested in October 2015 after concerns were raised by Calderdale College about his unusual interest in chemicals and wanting to develop a science lab at home. A man who targeted police officers and a judge after becoming obsessed with “limitless revenge” against authority figures has been jailed for 20 years.West Yorkshire Police said Ashkan Ebrahimi, 33, conducted extensive research on 38 different individuals as he amassed chemicals and weapons including swords, crossbows and air rifles.Senior officers said they “strongly believe that he would have eventually executed his plans in harming a police officer on the streets of West Yorkshire”.The force confirmed that Ebrahimi, of Halifax, was sentenced on Tuesday after being found guilty of possessing explosives with intent to endanger life, possession on an offensive weapon, possession of a bladed article in a public place and stalking offences.A jury at Bradford Crown Court heard how Ebrahimi became obsessed with revenge against the authorities after was he issued with a non-molestation order against his former partner by a judge in the county court and was subsequently separated from his young child. He developed a deep-seated and consuming hatred and loathing for people in authority, in the main police officers, and set about research and planning his limitless revenge against them Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Rape victims dropping allegations over fears defence lawyers will use mobile phone

Harriet Wistrich, who successfully represented two rape victims in a landmark judicial review of the Parole Board’s decision to release black cab rapist John Worboys, told The Telegraph that in some areas police are demanding “almost unlimited” access to the mobile phones of victims and other data before pressing ahead with cases. She said: “There is evidence that there’s a real problem with rape victims, including teenagers, being told to hand over their phones. Rape victims are dropping allegations over fears defence lawyers will use personal information on their phones against them, the solictor who took on John Worboys has warned. “We are hearing from rape crisis groups that women are refusing… read more

Weekend foggy earphones How three random words helped police come to rescue

awaited.passively.landings – the What3Words  address for StonehengeCredit:What3words / SWNS Costly Awesome Florists – the What3Words address for the Eden Project in CornwallCredit:What3words / SWNS Costly Awesome Florists - the What3Words address for the Eden Project in Cornwall Thousands of other organisations have also adopted the technology, including the UN, which uses it for disaster relief, Mercedes-Benz, which recently launched the world’s first car with built-in What3Words voice navigation, and Domino’s Pizza.Individuals can also use it to meet in crowded places such as on beaches or at festivals.The technology was the brainchild of  British entrepreneur Chris Sheldrick, who says it is more specific than postcodes, which were invented when posting letters was the main form of communication, and simpler than GPS co-ordinates.Mr Sheldrick and his friend Jack Waley-Cohen, a mathematician, who met when they both played chess at Eton, came up with the idea in 2013 and spent a year developing the product. They ensure that words that have two different spellings and profanities are carefully screened out.To generate 57 trillion three-word addresses, the company uses the cube root of that figure – a pool of about 38,500 words. Sam Sheppard, of Avon & Somerset Police, said it had changed the way the force dealt with incidents when the location unknown.He said: “We are moving away from the old style questioning – ‘Where have you come from?’, ‘Where are you going?’, ‘What can you see?’ etc. “These questions take time and aren’t always that accurate. Asking for a three word address or sending an SMS so they can easily provide their three word address, has meant we have saved valuable time locating incidents.” Two other police forces, Humberside and West Yorkshire, also use the system, as does the British Transport Police and three fire services; Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire.Call handlers can send a text to the caller with a link to a page that generates their three-word address. awaited.passively.landings - the What3Words  address for Stonehenge Terrified and utterly disorientated after flipping her car into a ditch, Valerie Hawkett found herself stranded with absolutely no idea where she was. After managing to pull herself and her four-year-old daughter free from the vehicle, she called the police. But she could not be seen from the road and was unable to direct them to the scene.Incredibly, officers were able to pinpoint her exact location using new technology that assigns three random words to every 3m X 3m square on the planet.As such, after being sent the relevant web link, the words “weekend foggy earphones” led officers straight to the scene – a field on the A36 heading out of Norton St Philip, Somerset.The geocoding system, called What3Words has divided the world into 57 trillion squares, each of which has its own unique address.Avon and Somerset Police were among the first in the UK to pilot the technology last year and Ms Hawkett, 33, and her daughter are believed to be the first rescued with it. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Medal awarded to Nazi soldier who took five bullets for Hitler fetches

In March the Holocaust Educational Trust called for a review into the sale of Nazi memorabilia – which remains legal in the UK – amid the rise in visible anti-Semitism. It is, however, illegal to sell Nazi memorabilia or items linked to the Holocaust in other European countries such as Germany, France and Austria.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “The Nazis were walking to a monument that honoured the Bavarian Army when they met a police cordon across the road.”Karen Pollock MBE, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, suggested that regulation was needed to prohibit the sale of Nazi memorabilia and criticised the comments.She told The Telegraph: “It has long been our view that it is not appropriate for items like this to be on the market for personal profit or macabre interest but rather placed in archives, museums or in an educational context.”“Several leading auction houses and online sites already rightly refuse to sell such material and many countries have banned the sale of Nazi memorabilia. Perhaps it is time for clearer regulation on the sale of these items here in the UK.” A medal awarded to a Nazi soldier who took five bullets meant for Adolf Hitler has sold for a “world record” price.The Blutorden Blood Order Medal was awarded to Ulrich Graf, who helped protect Hitler when he tried to seize power in Bavaria in November 1923 – an event known as The Beer Hall Putsch.The item fetched nine times its £3,500-£4,000 asking price at auction after selling for £36,500 at Derbyshire-based Hansons Auctioneers’ Militaria Auction on July 26.However, the auction house was criticised after saying that banning the sale of Nazi memorabilia would do a “disservice” to Holocaust victims.Adrian Stevenson, a militaria expert at Hansons auctioneers, said: “It’s a world-record price for a medal of its type – a phenomenal result. Interest in this medal was high right from the start. It’s a remarkable historical piece with a huge story to tell.”We know that in the 1950s Ulrich Graf’s family sold everything of his. They wanted no connection with his Nazi past.” He added: “Our vendor was a British doctor who had a large collection of German Third Reich medals which are among the most popular genres of medals.”Some countries like France ban the sale of Third Reich but I think that does a disservice to the victims of the Nazis, it is almost like sweeping it under the carpet. Karen Pollock MBE, Chief Executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, has called for a review into the sale of Nazi memorabilia Ulrich Graf, seen right of centre, alongside the Fuhrer at an event commemorating the Beer Hall Putsch, 15 years later, in 1938Credit:Hugo Jaeger/Timepix/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images After the buyer’s premium and VAT were added to the overall price, the figure paid by the private overseas buyer was £47,450.The silver medal, which features the Nazi eagle on one side and an image of the Munich monument on the other, was given to Graf after he threw himself on Hitler and survived after being shot.The former wrestler, who was one of the earliest members of the Nazi Party after it was founded in 1920, was one of Hitler’s personal protection squad during the battle – which ended with 16 party members and four officers killed. Karen Pollock MBE, Chief Executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, has called for a review into the sale of Nazi memorabiliaCredit:Tele/Tele A spokeswoman for Hansons said: “We fully respect and understand Karen Pollock’s viewpoint. However, we also fully respect the historical importance of the objects we sell. It’s impossible to ignore history or brush away the past. This item was sold purely as an historical object.”Militaria items are collected worldwide by people who have a passionate interest in wartime history. Museums or educational establishments are free to obtain these items if they wish.” Top Nazi Party members march in remembrance of 1923 Beer Hall Putsch, Munich, Germany, November 9, 1938 read more

Gangs and sexual exploitation pushing more teenagers into care warns Childrens Commissioner

Responding to the figures, Ms Longfield said: “There are an increasing number of teenage children in the care system and too many of them are ‘pin-balling’ around the system, changing home and family, school and social worker.“Often they have the most complex and expensive needs. In one local authority, 20% of the entire children’s services budget is being spent on just ten children. This is completely unsustainable.“It is clear that we have a care system which is playing catch up. The new norm is shifting so that fewer babies and very young children are being taken off parents who cannot cope. Instead it is teenagers who are being taken into care because they are experiencing issues such as criminal or sexual exploitation, going missing from home, and parents being unable to protect them.”She added: “The result is a care system that is struggling to cope and which in turn is not providing the stability that many highly vulnerable children need. We should be alarmed that one in ten children in care moved home four or more times in three years. These children are being denied the chance to put down roots, to feel part of a family and to settle at school. It is not surprising that they are often the ones most at risk of exploitation.“All children in care have a right to expect that the state does all it can to improve their chances of growing up in stable and loving environments.” The Stability Index was launched in 2017 and is an annual measure of the stability of the lives of children in England and Wales. It records data on the number of times children in care move home placement, school or social worker. For the first time this year, it has recorded figures for each council.The data reveals that older children are six times more likely than children under 13 to be living in residential or secure children’s homes, and nearly half are living in privately-run accommodation.It also found that there was a large increase in the number of over 16s entering care during the year. This number grew by 25% between 2013/14 and 2017/18 – much higher than for any other age group. As a result, nearly 1 in 4 children in care (23%) is now over 16. A further 2 in 5 (39%) are aged 10-15.These changes have transformed the children’s care model from one based on very young children living in foster homes, to one where more and more older children are entering care and needing more specialist homes. The Children’s Commissioner said that these are teenagers who are significantly more likely to have the following issues flagged up by social workers: child sexual exploitation (6 times more likely), going missing from home (7 times more likely), gangs (5 times more likely), trafficking (12 times more likely) and child drug misuse (4 times more likely). Gang violence, sexual exploitation and trafficking are forcing a rising number of teenagers into care, the Children’s Commissioner has warned.   Credit:Katie Collins /PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Gang violence, sexual exploitation and trafficking are forcing a rising number of teenagers into care, the Children’s Commissioner has warned. The “explosion” in the number of older children entering the care system over the last five years has sparked concern that the stability of the care system is under threat.The latest government data reveals how the profile and needs of children in care has changed over, driven by a growing share of older children and teenage care entrants who have more complex needs and potentially more expensive living arrangements. The Children’s Commissioner’s annual Stability Index shows how the number of teenagers (aged 13 or over) in care rose by 21% between 2012/13 and 2017/18, while the number of number of 0-5 year olds fell by 15%. Anne Longfield, the Children’s Commissioner for England is today warning that councils and the Government “have yet to catch up with this new normal” of an increasing number of teenagers “pin-balling around the system” – which she claims is “unsustainable”.She warned that services are struggling to cope with rising numbers of teenagers being taken into care because they are experiencing issues such as criminal or sexual exploitation, going missing from home, and parents being unable to protect them.There were 16,620 children aged 0-5 in care in 2012 however this dropped to 14,090 children in 2019. In contrast there were 37,730 children aged 10 and above in care in 2012 – a figure which rose to 47,040 in 2018. For those aged 16 and above, 13,580 were in care in 2012, and by 2018, this figure increased to 17,330. Gang violence, sexual exploitation and trafficking are forcing a rising number of teenagers into care, the Children’s Commissioner has warned.    read more

European allies see the two sides of Trump

By Noah Barkin | TAORMINA, ItalyU.S. President Donald Trump reacts after a family photo at the G7 Summit expanded session in Taormina, Sicily, Italy, May 27, 2017. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi(Reuters) In Sicily, Donald Trump listened attentively during complex G7 debates over trade and climate change, smiled for the cameras, and for the most part refrained from provocative tweets.In Brussels, he bashed NATO partners for not spending more on defense, shoved the prime minister of Montenegro and renewed his attacks on Germany’s trade surplus with the United States.America’s allies witnessed the two sides of Trump on his first foreign trip as U.S. president, a nine-day tour that began with sword dancing in Saudi Arabia and vague pledges in Israel to deliver Middle East peace.As Trump headed home, European officials were left with mixed feelings: relief that he had been patient enough to listen to their arguments and unsettled by a Jekyll-and-Hyde figure who is still finding his way on the big policy issues.“It all fits with his strategic ambiguity approach to life,” said Julianne Smith of the Centre for a New American Security. “It may do wonders when dealing with adversaries. But it doesn’t work when dealing with allies,” she said.Other leaders of the Group of Seven nations had viewed with trepidation their summit, held at a cliff-top hotel overlooking the Mediterranean, after four preparatory meetings failed to clear up differences with the Trump administration on trade, how to deal with Russia and climate change.But in the end, officials said, the result was better than they had feared.The final communique acknowledged a split between the United States and its six partners over honoring the 2015 Paris accord on climate change. That followed a debate with Trump that German Chancellor Angela Merkel described as “very dissatisfying”.However on trade, Trump bowed to pressure from allies to retain a pledge to fight protectionism. And on Russia, he did not insist on removing – as some allies had feared – the threat of additional sanctions for Moscow’s intervention in Ukraine.“I found him very willing to engage, very curious, with an ability and desire to ask questions and to learn from all his interlocutors,” said Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, the G7 summit’s host.NATO “DISASTER”Still, there was irritation at Trump’s refusal to show his hand on the Paris agreement to curb carbon emissions. Near the end of the summit, he tweeted teasingly that he would make a decision on Paris next week, leaving delegations to scratch their heads about why he could not commit in Taormina.The most critical words were reserved for Trump’s appearance at NATO headquarters in Brussels, which was described as a “disaster” by more than one European official.With the leaders of America’s NATO partners standing like school children behind him, Trump upbraided them for not spending more on defense and repeated the charge that some members owed “massive amounts of money” from past years – even though allied contributions are voluntary.Most disturbingly for allies, Trump did not personally affirm his commitment to Article 5, NATO’s mutual defense doctrine, after pre-trip signals from the White House that he would do just that. Trump also failed to mention Russia, which remains NATO’s raison d’etre in the eyes of most Europeans.It was a speech that reminded some of Trump’s doom-laden inauguration address in January, one that seemed written for the hardest of his hard-core domestic audience. “Proud of @realDonaldTrump for telling NATO deadbeats to pay up or shut up,” former Republican governor Mike Huckabee tweeted in response.Trump’s appearance in Brussels was particularly galling to the Germans, who after months of painstaking relationship building with Trump – including Merkel’s invitation to his daughter Ivanka for a G20 women’s summit in Berlin – found themselves under attack from him on two fronts.Before heading to NATO, Trump criticized Germany’s trade surplus in a private meeting with senior European Union officials.“If Trump really wants to go down a path of isolation, it will only speed up China’s rise to the top,” one senior German official grumbled.ZERO-SUMBeyond the rhetoric, Trump’s body language also confounded his hosts. He muscled aside Montenegrin Prime Minister Dusko Markovic as NATO leaders walked into the alliance’s new headquarters for a photo session.And he engaged in two alpha-male handshakes with France’s new 39-year-old President Emmanuel Macron, who seemed to get the better of Trump on both occasions.The macho posturing in Europe contrasted to the images, a few days earlier, of Trump and his team swaying, swords in hand, with the absolute rulers of Saudi Arabia at a lavish welcome ceremony given by King Salman.Summing up the tour on Saturday, Trump’s advisers seemed most enthused about the Saudi leg, where he clinched a $110 billion arms deal and forged what one aide described as a “personal bond” with the king.“The president was able to make some of the most amazing deals that have really been made by any administration ever,” enthused his economic adviser Gary Cohn.Daniela Schwarzer, research director at the German Council of Foreign Relations in Berlin, said the trip had confirmed Trump’s “zero-sum game” view of the world in which you are either a winner or a loser and relationships are transactional.“His rhetoric and actions suggest he does not consider it a priority to build good and engaging relations with allies the U.S. so far considered its most important ones,” she said.(Writing by Noah Barkin; Additional reporting by Crispian Balmer; editing by David Stamp) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedTrump trade war threat sets up G7 summit clashJune 7, 2018In “World”In first Trump-Merkel meeting, awkward body language and a quipMarch 18, 2017In “World”G7 summit ends in disarray as Trump abandons joint statementJune 9, 2018In “World” read more

Shortage of sugar on local market possible with Enmore production deficit

The East Demerara Sugar Estate (Enmore) is way behind its production target for the first crop of 2017, and this could possibly result in a shortage of sugar on the local market.This information was relayed by the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo) to President of the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU) Komal Chand, sometime last week.President of GAWU, Komal Chand“There will be a shortage of sugar on the local market, because (at Enmore) they needed to produce 1200 tonnes of sugar from the time they closed the crop some days ago,” Chand disclosed.GAWU was, last week, asked to intervene to resolve a dispute between the workers and the management of GuySuCo, after management had closed the crop and wanted to restart it in the last week of May.The workers had already made up their minds that the crop was closed, and therefore demanded that GuySuCo give them their out-of-crop benefit — holiday with a week’s pay. Although workers agreed to return to work, adverse weather conditions and the poor state of the dams along the cane fields served as major impediments to the estate’s target being met.“They will not be able to make the target to ensure that the local market is adequately supplied with sugar. They are far from realising it…there is a massive deficit at Enmore Estate,” Chand again emphasised.Chand said the only estate that remains in operation at this time is Enmore, and its production as at April 22, 2017 stood at around 8000 tonnes of sugar. Thus, he said, the overall production across the sugar industry would be severely curtailed.Accordingly, GuySuCo’s first crop set target of approximately 74,000 tonnes of sugar may not be realised.“(GuySuCo’s first crop production) most likely would not surpass 50,000 tonnes. (It was) at 49,000 tonnes with only Enmore operating. Production will be significantly curtailed by over 24,000 tonnes. (GuySuCo) might just make 67 percent of the sugar production (target),” Chand explained.It was revealed in early May that Uitvlugt Estate, located on the West Coast of Demerara (WCD), had missed its first crop production target by just over 1300 tonnes. This estate has reportedly produced 7031 tonnes of the projected 8339 tonnes of sugar, representing a shortfall of 1308 tonnes of the projected target.A number of factors were reportedly responsible for the estate’s shortfall in production, two of which were: rat damage to crops, and cane shortage to facilitate production. This publication learnt that much of the canes from several locations on the West Bank of Demerara (WBD) could not, in fact, go to Uitvlugt for processing.Finance Minister Winston Jordan, in his 2017 Budget presentation, had indicated that the status quo in the sugar industry could neither be sustained nor maintained. He explained that, as currently structured, the industry would require Government’s support to the tune of $18.6 billion for 2017 and $21.4 billion for 2018.He elaborated that, based on the CoI, it was concluded that any money injected into the sugar industry in its current state was money wasted. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedGAWU says Govt should ‘permanently postpone’ closure of sugar estates, save jobsNovember 20, 2017In “latest news”“GuySuCo is a headless chicken without a Board of Directors” – GAWU’s Komal ChandJune 17, 2014In “Politics”GAWU Head “disturbed” at sacking of GuySuCo’s CEO, but admits industry was “lagging”June 5, 2015In “Politics”,The East Demerara Sugar Estate (Enmore) is way behind its production target for the first crop of 2017, and this could possibly result in a shortage of sugar on the local market.This information was relayed by the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo) to President of the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU) Komal Chand, sometime last week.President of GAWU, Komal Chand“There will be a shortage of sugar on the local market, because (at Enmore) they needed to produce 1200 tonnes of sugar from the time they closed the crop some days ago,” Chand disclosed.GAWU was, last week, asked to intervene to resolve a dispute between the workers and the management of GuySuCo, after management had closed the crop and wanted to restart it in the last week of May.The workers had already made up their minds that the crop was closed, and therefore demanded that GuySuCo give them their out-of-crop benefit — holiday with a week’s pay. Although workers agreed to return to work, adverse weather conditions and the poor state of the dams along the cane fields served as major impediments to the estate’s target being met.“They will not be able to make the target to ensure that the local market is adequately supplied with sugar. They are far from realising it…there is a massive deficit at Enmore Estate,” Chand again emphasised.Chand said the only estate that remains in operation at this time is Enmore, and its production as at April 22, 2017 stood at around 8000 tonnes of sugar. Thus, he said, the overall production across the sugar industry would be severely curtailed.Accordingly, GuySuCo’s first crop set target of approximately 74,000 tonnes of sugar may not be realised.“(GuySuCo’s first crop production) most likely would not surpass 50,000 tonnes. (It was) at 49,000 tonnes with only Enmore operating. Production will be significantly curtailed by over 24,000 tonnes. (GuySuCo) might just make 67 percent of the sugar production (target),” Chand explained.It was revealed in early May that Uitvlugt Estate, located on the West Coast of Demerara (WCD), had missed its first crop production target by just over 1300 tonnes. This estate has reportedly produced 7031 tonnes of the projected 8339 tonnes of sugar, representing a shortfall of 1308 tonnes of the projected target.A number of factors were reportedly responsible for the estate’s shortfall in production, two of which were: rat damage to crops, and cane shortage to facilitate production. This publication learnt that much of the canes from several locations on the West Bank of Demerara (WBD) could not, in fact, go to Uitvlugt for processing.Finance Minister Winston Jordan, in his 2017 Budget presentation, had indicated that the status quo in the sugar industry could neither be sustained nor maintained. He explained that, as currently structured, the industry would require Government’s support to the tune of $18.6 billion for 2017 and $21.4 billion for 2018.He elaborated that, based on the CoI, it was concluded that any money injected into the sugar industry in its current state was money wasted. read more

Porter crushed to death by container truck

A porter was killed on Saturday, March 9, 2019, after he attempted to climb onto a moving container truck that he was working on.The accident occurred sometime around 13:00h in the vicinity of the Kara Kara toll booth and the Guyana Forestry Commission at Mackenzie, Linden, Region 10.The dead man has been identified as Jomal Anthony.According to an employee at the toll booth, in an effort to avoid paying the full toll fare, porters would usually go to the booth with less money as the trucks drive by, and then run to catch the vehicle.That was the cause of this morning’s accident. It was reported that Anthony handed over the money at the toll booth and ran to catch up the motor lorry GSS 1407 carrying with trailer TMM 2242 which had slowed down for him.However, while on the truck, the porter lost his grip on the gas tank, and he fell off the vehicle and ended up under the wheels.He was pronounced dead on the spot by a doctor attached to the Linden Hospital Complex.The driver of the container truck, a 28-year-old resident of Triumph, East Coast Demerara (ECD) has since been taken into Police custody and is assisting with investigations. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedPorter killed in Kara Kara accident identified as Plaisance residentMarch 10, 2019In “Crime”Another succumbs in Soesdyke/Linden Highway smash up, death toll now up to 4January 5, 2017In “latest news”Man dead after truck topples on Lethem/Linden trailJuly 4, 2019In “Crime” read more