History-making Olympian Juliet Cuthbert-Flynn

first_imgConsidering herself an unyielding soul, history-making double Olympic silver medallist Juliet Cuthbert-Flynn had no doubts that she would win a parliamentary seat as throughout life – in athletics as well as everyday pursuits – she has never settled for anything but the best.Cuthbert-Flynn earned double Olympic silver medals in the 100m and 200m at the 1992 Barcelona Games in Spain and copped bronze four years later in Atlanta, United States, as a member of Jamaica’s 4x100m women’s team.”I didn’t settle for second (1992 Olympics). It is what it is. Anything that I do, anyone who knows me knows that I am going to try to do the best that I can and not going to ever do anything half and half. Never!” she stressed.The 51-year-old on Thursday became Jamaica’s first Olympian to win a seat in Parliament.She emphatically upstaged two-time parliamentarian Paul Buchanan for the St Andrew West Rural constituency.Cuthbert-Flynn, running in her first election, polled 9,742 votes to Buchanan’s 7,517.ALWAYS CONFIDENT”I was always confident of victory because I was putting in the work. I was walking sometimes six, seven days a week, and I was walking for five to six hours a day. I walked off two pairs of sneakers. The bottoms fell off,” she told The Gleaner in an interview.Though many would consider her a celebrity and international star, Cuthbert-Flynn contends that she still joins lines in public places like banks and lives a low-key life.”Representing your country in track and field, it’s little bit different. I think it’s going to be little bit different representing the people of the country in Parliament because when you are running, you’re running for yourself in a lot of ways and the country gets the glory, but I think in this race and in this instance, it is a little bit different. It’s not just for me. It’s not really about me, It’s really about the people. That’s how I look at it,” she pointed out.Cuthbert-Flynn describes her journey in life as an Olympian and politician as an important one, one that has inspired and motivated people, but she adds that she now considers herself a public servant.”I think just seeing the things that I’ve seen on my journey, it gives me that extra push where I must give a hundred per cent and I must do for the people. I must work for the people. There is no half and half … I want to leave a legacy just like I have in track and field,” she remarked.”I have left a legacy in track and field that no one can ever take away from me. They can tell me that I got second, but I am in the history books forever and ever,” she added.last_img read more

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U17 World Challenge to be broadcast on Moose FM

first_img6:45 p.m. Moose FM is proud to announce broadcast for the upcoming World U17 Hockey Challenge. Moose FM has partnered with the local World U17 Hockey Challenge organizing committees to broadcast a game a day during the tournament.Moose FM will broadcast one game a day starting at 7 p.m. from Fort St. John each night from November 1-3 and November 5. Then November 6 & 7th from Dawson Creek.Here is the broadcast schedule: 6:45 p.m.Advertisement Semi-Final (teams to be decided) from Dawson Creek 6:45 p.m.Advertisement 6:45 p.m. Saturday, November 7, 2015 Canada Red vs Sweden from FSJ Moose FM’s Chase Charney and the Alaska Highway News sports reporter Byron Hackett will call each game on 100.1 Moose FM in Fort St. John and online at www.moosefm.ca. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. Canada Red vs Russia from FSJ Monday, November 2, 2015 Gold Medal Game (teams to be decided) from Dawson Creek7:15 p.m.7:30 p.m. 6:45 p.m. 7 p.m.Advertisement Thursday, November 5, 2015 7 p.m. Tuesday, November 3, 2015 DayGamePre-GamePuck drop Friday, November 6, 2015Advertisement 7 p.m. Quarter Final (teams to be decided) from FSJ – Advertisement -Sunday, November 1, 2015 Canada Red vs Finland from FSJlast_img read more

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Raiders TE Jared Cook named to Pro Bowl as alternate

first_imgRaiders tight end Jared Cook will attend his first Pro Bowl after his 10th NFL season, replacing Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce in the annual all-star showcase.Cook led the Raiders with a career-high 896 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He finished fourth among tight ends in receiving yards and tied for fourth in touchdowns. Kelce and Colts tight end Eric Ebron were initially named as the AFC’s Pro Bowl tight ends, with Kelce amassing 1,336 receiving yards and 10 touchdowns, and Ebron …last_img read more

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These five A’s who could push Oakland into the ALDS

first_imgThe A’s are just hours away from taking on the Tampa Bay Rays at the Coliseum for their second straight wild-card game. Who should you keep an eye on? All of them, sure, but here are five key names that could be influential in getting this team to the ALDS, where Houston awaits.LHP Sean Manaea: The wild-card game’s starter for the A’s has been sharp in all five of his starts since returning from last year’s season-ending shoulder surgery. He has a 1.21 ERA with 30 strikeouts and a .775 WHIP …last_img read more

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IDC fund helps companies go green

first_imgIn South African Calcium Carbide’s current production process, the waste gas generated by heating raw materials in furnaces is simply flared-off on site. But with IDC funding this gas will now put to good use as fuel for an 8MW cogeneration plant. (Image: IDC) MEDIA CONTACTS • Industrial Development Corporation Green Energy Efficiency Fund +27 11 269 3000 geef@idc.co.za RELATED ARTICLES • SA becoming renewable energy hub • Green buildings now the law in SA • SA maps its freshwater priority areas • Waste gives Such artistic inspiration • Plastic recyscling a major job spinner Emily van RijswijckEnergy-efficient and environment-friendly South African companies now have a competitive edge, thanks to the R500-million Green Energy Efficiency Fund launched by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and German development bank Kfw in mid-October.The fund has been developed to provide loans with favourable terms to small to medium-sized enterprises that use energy-efficient equipment and technologies, increase productivity while cutting back on waste, and reduce emissions or use renewable resources. To qualify, companies will have to have a turnover of R51-million or less, hold R55-million in assets and employ no more than 200 people.Speaking at the launch of the fund, IDC CEO Geoffrey Qhena said it was designed to promote investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy, technologies that will help South Africa transition to a low-carbon economy.“We want to provide increased access to energy efficiency and renewable energy financing across all industry sectors, he said. “Setting up this fund with Kfw is crucial for the country and a key addition to our portfolio of ring-fenced funds directed at a specific goal.” The fund is aligned to government’s Industrial Policy Action Plan and New Growth Path.Qhena said the fund was suited to smaller enterprises as it provided cheaper financial backing than other sources on the market. Loans from R1-million up to R50-million are available at the concessionary rate of prime less 2%, with a repayment period of up to 15 years.“Funding is available to companies who plan to implement projects that will provide significant energy savings and/or emissions reductions, or will offset grid-connected electricity through renewable energy generation for self-use,” said Rentia van Tonder, head of the green industries strategic business unit at the IDC.In addition to funding, approved companies will also get technical support from the IDC and Kfw.“We have access to both local and international technical experts who will develop eligible enterprises by performing energy assessments, calculating financial benefits and supporting the selection of eligible equipment and enhanced performance technologies,” said Van Tonder.From waste gas to electricityOne company whose loan has already been approved is South African Calcium Carbide (SACC), an energy-intensive chemical producer with monthly electricity costs of almost R7-million.In the company’s current production process the waste gas generated by heating raw materials in furnaces is simply flared-off on site. But with the new funding SACC will now put this waste gas to good use, generating fuel for an 8MW cogeneration plant that will decrease the company’s reliance on the national grid and cut emissions by 46 000 tons of carbon dioxide a year.“The decision to invest in a cogeneration plant comes on the back of increasing electricity prices and constraints in South Africa, as well as growing environmental concerns,” says general manager of Claudio Siracusano.He adds that the additional capacity created by the plant will enable them to operate at full production compared with the current 70% capacity because of electricity constraints.The new plant will be operational by October 2012 and has been registered as a Clean Development Mechanism project. Revenues earned from the 450 000 carbon credits expected to be earned by the project will be used to pay back the 10-year IDC loan.Carbon neutral clothingA funding success story which is already up and running is that of Impahla Clothing in Cape Town. A small company manufacturing sports and leisurewear, Impahla is South Africa’s first carbon neutral clothing company, an accolade it received three years ago.“In order to reduce our carbon footprint, Impahla Clothing took the decision to find alternative sources of energy and being based in Cape Town, South Africa, solar energy, although not a cheap option, was the most obvious,” William Hughes, managing director for Impahla, said in an IDC case study.With the Green Energy Efficiency Fund the company installed a grid connected rooftop Solar Photo Voltaic system which generates 25% of the company’s annual electricity requirements. This saving fully covers the investment cost and interest on the loan which will be paid back over 14 years.last_img read more

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Johannesburg developing entrepreneurs who make a difference

first_img5 May 2016Welcome! #JoziMyBeginning pic.twitter.com/qzazOYJbED— JoziMyBeginning (@JoziMyBeginning) April 19, 2016A City of Johannesburg business initiative, Jozi: My Beginning, announced the final 17 ventures selected from over 2 000 entrants to receive a financial helping hand from the city. It will allow them to grow and compete in the marketplace, while creating jobs and boosting the economy.The initiative forms part of the Jozi@Work program that is setting aside R50-million to fund local talent with innovative business ideas that can benefit the public and enrich the lives of local residents.@CityofJoburgZA Mayor @ParksTauCOJ explains the COJ’s excitement to be a part of the #JoziMyBeginning initiative pic.twitter.com/ve9PZLN1sy— JoziMyBeginning (@JoziMyBeginning) April 19, 2016Announcing the results on 20 April 2016, Johannesburg mayor Mpho Parks Tau congratulated the 17 businesses selected to develop its ideas further, adding how vital it was for the businesses to provide local solutions to local problems, saying it should not always be on the shoulders of the municipality.The mayor also noted the need for these businesses to be able to compete successfully nationally and internationally, saying “local solutions to local problems help us grow enterprises into not only locally competitive enterprises but into internationally competitive enterprises”.Two of the finalists have developed unique ideas that show promise for servicing the community. One addresses the challenges of shack fire prevention and the other tries to solve the issue of rubbish collection and recycling.Fireproofing informal settlementsJonathan Frost and Peter Barthel spent years developing a viable solution to the problem of shack fires in and around the city.Through trial and error tests, the pair came up with a safe chemical applicant that can be used to curb the spread of fires in any home.“[The concept is] a fire-proofing material that you can apply onto any structure for example glass [or] metal surfaces for your informal settlements. We want to prevent the spread of fire from the source hence securing the rest of the dwellings surrounding them so that they don’t get damaged,” Frost told news website, News24.According to Frost, the applicant can be applied to the inside of an informal home made up of timber frames and metal parts.“The chemicals will reduce the burn properties of wood and wood products and will give shack dwellers a chance to either douse the fire or vacate the shack in time. It will also prevent spreading of fires to adjacent shacks,” Frost said.The chemical solution is easy to apply and can be done as one would apply plaster on a wall, he said. There would be initial training involved with individuals in the community interested in using the product, and they would then get an opportunity to start their own business in their respective communities, selling the product to the residents.The product is currently undergoing various health and safety tests, but the outcome for the idea looks positive. Considering the product’s selection for Jozi: My Beginning, Frost said “we’re very privileged to have been chosen. I’m looking forward to developing the product fully”.A fresh take on trash collectionSifiso is using media as a catalyst for social change. His project, #abomakgereza recently did a clean-up of Jozi! pic.twitter.com/sZglZR8t3V— Spark* South Africa (@SparkINT_SA) April 1, 2015Abomakgereza, a recycling idea with a difference, has been developed by Soweto entrepreneur Sifiso Ngobese, who looked at improving safety of “recycling riders” – those who sift through rubbish to collect and sell recyclables. “The biggest problem that the [riders] face on a regular basis is that the trolleys they use break down easily and have poor visibility at night,” Ngobese said about the genesis of the idea.Ngobese and his team designed and built a safer, roadworthy and more functional trolley that riders could use to collect, as well generate some extra income. To finance the manufacturing, Ngobese sold advertising space on the trolleys, “it doubles up as a mobile billboard where companies can advertise their brand and add content on the trolley,” he explained, adding that 10% of all business profits for the companies generated from the advertising will be distributed to the trolley riders, in the form of food, financial support and anything else the recyclers may need.The company is beginning to create a database of registered, vetted riders that could be accessed by both potential advertisers as well as the municipality. The system can track the identities and number of riders operating in a specific area, as well as the amount of recycling items the trolleys pick up.The project currently has 40 recycling riders registered on its database. With the help of the Jozi: My Beginning initiative, Ngobese would like to increase that number to 100.Those who will be at the 702 walk the talk looking out for #Abomakgereza with branded trolleys cleaning up the venue. pic.twitter.com/UwzNmQLgK5— Abomakgereza (@ngobese_sifiso) July 24, 2015The idea has also developed into waste management services for special events, such as the 702 Walk The Talk race in 2015 which saw recyclers using their trolleys to tidy up after the event.Ngobese hopes the Abomakgereza business concept, now with backing from the City of Johannesburg, can branch out into full time waste management as a supplementary service with larger waste pick up companies to serve more areas of the community.Sources: News24/News24last_img read more

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Social cause meets food production business at Waterfields

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseClad in jeans that were torn when she bought them and neon pink rubber work boots, Erica Byrd does not necessarily match the typical idea of a farmer from Ohio. But, she never intended to be a typical farmer.Byrd works at Waterfields LLC — a hydroponic supplier of premium microgreens based in Cincinnati to provide jobs and quality products to the community.“I had no money for real. I was living from paycheck to paycheck. Then Waterfields called me. I never had heard of Waterfields but I knew I wanted to work here. I went to the interview and was amazed. I had to work here. I bugged them every day and I got the job. And from then, everything has gone up from there,” Byrd said. “I was just calling them plants for the first couple of months and I had to keep saying microgreens, microgreens, microgreens. I love it. I love watching the seeds grow to be teenagers, then into adults, then go off to the chefs. I never thought I’d be a farmer.”Waterfields started with five partners and no employees as a social mission in Cincinnati and has turned into a thriving agricultural enterprise.“Cincinnati has some negative things attached to it like gun violence and poverty. Vic Garcia is a pediatric surgeon who kept seeing kids come in with gunshot wounds. He thought he could save more lives by addressing the root causes of what was going on as opposed to his work in the emergency room. He was a very accomplished surgeon and is a very smart and talented guy. He decided to put his effort into addressing these root causes,” said Daniel Klemens, who handles marketing for Waterfields. “One of the root causes of these problems is a lack of jobs and employment.”Waterfields pairs a social mission with a viable food production business in Cincinnati. Daniel Klemens is one of the founders.And, one of the results of Garcia’s efforts is Waterfields, created to provide jobs in parts of the city with limited employment opportunities through a successful business model. The hydroponic production of microgreens seemed like it could be a good fit for the area.“We started knocking on doors of restaurants to talk with chefs about the idea of them buying microgreens. We wanted to do the smallest viable test possible to see if it would work and it did. It just clicked. The Cincinnati restaurant scene was really picking up and the chefs were really helpful. There is community here and they supported us,” Klemens said. “We wanted to get people from that neighborhood, teach them agriculture and employ them with a meaningful living wage. We worked to identify people who wanted to work and we found them. We launched in November of 2013. We had seven customers and we really took off after that. We started this with $5,000 or $6,000 and leased an old warehouse in Lower Price Hill — there are no businesses there. There is a convenience store and that is it. It is a rough part of town. You wouldn’t walk around there.”Because they were producing food, it was no small amount of work getting the old facility set up to meet Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) required for food safety.“If you sell to distributors you have to have your GAP certification from the USDA.It is lot of paperwork. We developed a system to use smart phones to track our trays. Each tray has a bar code. There is a lot of administrative stuff that goes along with food safety. It is work, but it opens significant doors,” he said. “In that first location, we built a room within the room we called a ‘bubble’ using vinyl to make it reasonably food safe. We got that first facility GAP certified, but it took a lot of work.”Along with their social mission, the folks at Waterfields knew they needed to offer a superior product and top-notch customer service to be viable long-term.“The chefs we work with were used to getting cut microgreens with a shelf life of five days. We came in with living microgreens and the shelf life is one to three weeks. We had a better tasting product that could be a meaningful ingredient on their plate. We had a product that could stand on its own besides the social issues. We got referrals all over. Today we sell to over 130 chefs just here in Cincinnati within the 275-loop. We deliver there in a truck. We also send products to Dayton, Columbus, Cleveland, Chicago, and Nashville in a six-hour radius to chefs and other distributors, including Premier ProduceOne with warehouses in Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland,” Klemens said. “We started with just living microgreens. We seeded stuff and if it germinated well we went with it. We were growing 10 or 12 different microgreens at first. Today we have 35 to 40 different living microgreens, cut microgreens, edible flowers like viola, nasturtium, marigolds, and specialty lettuces. We focus on the best product for our customers.”Many outside the culinary world may not know what microgreens are. Basically, they are just-sprouted plants that often have concentrated, unique flavors.“There is a whole genetics side of microgreen seeds, but in many cases it is just regular seed grown and harvested early,” he said. “We do a lot of experimenting with different varieties and if they will work for us — cucumber sprouts, peas, radishes, cilantro and many others.”The hydroponic production process starts with seeds planted in proprietary inert polyester grow media in a germination chamber. The germinated seeds are moved (still in the grow media) to grow rigs that contain shelving with levels of PVC channels. Water containing the necessary nutrients runs underneath the plants and grow lights are on top. Temperatures are kept around 68 degrees with a relative humidity of 70% to 75%.“Depending on the variety, it will be in the germination chamber for three to five days with just water in a temperature and humidity controlled environment,” Klemens said. “They are delicate but quick cycling. Then in the grow rigs at just one facility there are about 800 to 1,000 10-inch by 20-inch trays a week and stuff is always going in an out. The quickest turn around is seven days from seed to out the door. The longer stuff can be 40 days, but generally we are looking at an average of two weeks per tray.”Demand exploded for Waterfields products, particularly the still-living plants growing in the media. They also grow plants in the fields and greenhouses.“We sell a lot of different ways. We sell the living 10 by 20 trays locally. We sell half trays too that are 10 by 10. We also sell cut products in 4 or 8 ounces and others are sold in mixes,” Klemens said. “Every season for the last three years we have done significant outdoor production in the city. The ground used to be farmed but hasn’t been for a while. It is tucked away. You turn down this gravel road in town and you are in this old farming district. We grow the flowers there and some of our specialty cuts. Some of it is started in greenhouses and a lot is just planted from seed or starts. The total field production is less than an acre. We have a greenhouse that is part of Diamond Oaks Vocational School and we fill their greenhouse space through an agreement we have. We have a second greenhouse in an old flower district that we lease. A lot of our production is in that greenhouse now. We have a total of five locations in production.”In terms of the indoor production there have been multiple expansions.“We expended twice now. We moved out of our 8th Street location at Lower Price Hill after we ran out of electrical capacity and couldn’t produce any more. We leased another space — an old slaughter house — with concrete floors, more electric and floor drains, but then we outgrew that and then leased our current 10,000 square foot facility that used to be a meat distributor,” he said. “The No. 1 goal is to have the same conditions year round and these are very well insulated facilities, which helps with that.”The consistent, year-round production is an important part of meeting the needs of chefs but it is also important in maintaining year-round jobs for the community. Three of the initial five partners are now working full time jobs at Waterfields and the business has created additional jobs for seven people in the community.“Most farmers need seasonal help. With our social mission we wanted full time workers and everyone we’ve hired has been from the communities in which we operate. It is important for us to provide that living wage job for them. We work with some non-profits that work with folks on their resumes and get them ready to work. As we have grown we’ve hired more people and their responsibilities have grown too. Our first employee now handles all of our outdoor lettuce production,” Klemens said. “We had one or two problems with some systemic issues with trying to get people out of poverty. Transportation for example, is an issue. It is very difficult for someone relying on bus transit in Cincinnati to get here so we try to work with folks to make it work.”And for people like Erica Byrd, it has worked.“Erica is the mother to all of these plants and she embraces that. We don’t hire folks to be in entry-level positions forever. We can train people the basics and then they can really be successful,” Klemens said. “Erica knows more about the plants than I do now and she is a role model for those around here. There is a ripple effect in her home community because of what she has learned working here. We have a product that can stand on its own and we also have this social issue behind us that lets us empower individuals to really become something. As much as we are growing plants, we are growing people.”last_img read more

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Curtly Ambrose says WI pacers don’t scare batsmen now

first_imgWest Indies cricket is in a shambles and its fast bowlers have forgotten how to intimidate batsmen, feels legendary pacer Curtly Ambrose who does not foresee a return to past glory for the team anytime soon.”The present standard is very, very bad and the only way interest can be revived is if we start winning some matches,” said Ambrose, who took 405 wickets from his 98 Tests.Ambrose is disappointed that West Indian fast bowlers have forgotten the art of intimidating batsmen.”I think it’s very important for a fast bowler to be intimidating. He must intimidate batsmen. I used to do it. I liked to soften them up,” he recalled.The giant fast bowler, who terrorised the best in the world throughout the 90s, feels slow pitches have contributed a lot to the decline of pacers in the Caribbean.”Two things have contributed to the downfall of West Indies cricket. Firstly, the pitches in the Caribbean have really slowed down and secondly, there is no deal of great experience which is being passed around in the dressing room,” he lamented.He recollected his early playing days when interaction with Malcolm Marshall helped him finetune his skills.”When I joined the team, I learnt a lot by just interacting with Malcolm Marshall, and later with Courtney Walsh. Now, these guys (the present team) have nobody to talk to; they are just sharing between them whatever little they have learnt from international cricket.”Even though Ambrose was aggressive, it never affected his economy. A third of his 3000-odd overs in Test cricket were maidens and his career economy rate was a mere 2.31 runs per over.advertisementHe didn’t play much against India but his affection knows no bounds for Sachin Tendulkar.”When I first watched him, it was in England in 1990 when he appeared a schoolboy. Yet watching him hit his first century at the age of 17, you knew here was a special talent,” he said.Two years later, they were squaring up in a World Cup game in Basin Reserve Park in Wellington and Ambrose dismissed Tendulkar with a delivery that kicked off from short of good length to take his outside edge.”He was a young guy and I was senior. So I needed to keep that equation,” Ambrose laughed.Being reluctantly pushed into cricket by his mother at a rather late age of 21, Ambrose made it to the West Indies team within three years. Yet, it took him the next two years to really start thinking about the game seriously.”The mantle of being world champions was falling off and a guy like me really had to learn very, very quickly. It helped that I was naturally very strong, very competitive and very aggressive,” he said.For the Antiguan, the toughest batsman he ever bowled to was David Boon of Australia, not to mention former Aussie skipper Steve Waugh with whom he nearly exchanged fisticuffs.However, Ambrose still has a great deal of respect for Waugh.It was the Trinidad Test of 1995 series against Australia. Waugh was repeatedly hit on the body by Ambrose’s bouncers.He let out his steam with a few chosen ones and enraged Ambrose to the extent he stood next to him, glaring and a physical contest wasn’t far away.”I really wanted to hit him. We were trailing the series. I was being frustrated. But we settled it then and there. It didn’t go beyond the pitch.”Ambrose though had the last laugh when he won the Test for West Indies and helped them square the series 1-1.– With PTI inputslast_img read more

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Budget Travel to Launch Social Network Features

first_imgEarlier this month Budget Travel published a completely user-generated print issue. With more and more magazines venturing into the social networking space—and more of them eschewing Facebook and going the D.I.Y route—publishers are partnering with technology companies to create online networking applications.The latest: Budget Travel, which today announced it has contracted with a company called KickApps to power the new social media features on its Web site.Using the KickApps Platform, BudgetTravel.com will give users an opportunity to become ‘uncertified’ tour guides. The new tools “a blog for non-bloggers—travel journals that include slideshow functionality; a “star” ratings functionality for user-generated photos, videos and journal posts; and enabled comments on virtually every page of the Web site.KickApps, whose clients include Vibe, is also powering user’s photo and video submissions for Web features.last_img read more

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Disney Plus will discount a bundle with Hulu and ESPN Plus for

first_img Tags TV and Movies Digital Media Comments Everything we know about Disney Plus The original shows planned for Disney Plus include a big-budget Star Wars spinoff series, The Mandalorian. François Duhamel/Lucasfilm/Disney Plus Disney Plus, the $7-a-month streaming service coming from Disney in November, will be bundled at a discount with the company’s other streaming services: ESPN Plus and the ad-supported version of Hulu. Disney will combine all three subscriptions for $13 a month, CEO Bob Iger said Tuesday, a $5 discount on what you’d pay for the three services separately.That’s the same price as Netflix’s most popular plan in the US. (Iger said that’s a coincidence.) The bundle will be available in the US on Nov. 12, when Disney Plus is set to launch there. Disney also hinted Disney Plus would have reboots based on Fox franchises like Home Alone and Night at the Museum. Disney bought 21st Century Fox for $71.3 billion earlier this year. Iger said Tuesday that Disney is interested in “reimagining” those franchises and others like Cheaper by the Dozen and Diary of a Wimpy Kid “for a new generation.” In another effect of its Fox takeover, Iger said Disney may create FX shows that premiere on Hulu but ultimately end up running on the traditional network.Disney Plus is one of the highest-profile examples of traditional Hollywood digging in to compete against streaming services from the likes of Netflix, Amazon and, soon, Apple. With tech giants pouring money into their own TV shows and movies and luring consumers away from traditional pay TV, Disney is aiming to pull all its content off other services and consolidate it with flashy original programs on its own service. When Disney announced its “initial” $7-a-month pricing for Disney Plus in April, the theater full of investors and analysts gasped at the low price. That’s half the cost of HBO Now and significantly less than Netflix’s most popular plan. At that April meeting and since, Disney said it planned to offer a discounted bundle for all three of its subscription services, but it hadn’t specified the price until Tuesday.Though Disney Plus is meant to be the streaming home for nearly all things Disney — such as Marvel, Pixar and Star Wars — ESPN Plus is designed to complement the company’s cash-cow sports network. By subscribing to ESPN Plus, you don’t unlock the same programming that ESPN’s channels have. Disney Plus plansIger said Disney will be revving up its marketing machine to campaign for Disney Plus later this month. “It’s going to be treated as the most important product that the company has launched … certainly during my tenure,” he said. People attending Disney’s biennial fan conference in Anaheim, D23, are going to be the first to sign up as subscribers. D23 opens Aug. 23. Iger also expects Disney will strike deals with distributors like Amazon and Apple that sell subscriptions to streaming services through a single bill, like Amazon Channels. Originally published Aug 6.Update, Aug. 7: With Netflix context. Now playing: Watch this:center_img Disney Fox Hulu Netflix Share your voice 20 1:29last_img read more

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