History-making Olympian Juliet Cuthbert-Flynn

first_imgConsidering herself an unyielding soul, history-making double Olympic silver medallist Juliet Cuthbert-Flynn had no doubts that she would win a parliamentary seat as throughout life – in athletics as well as everyday pursuits – she has never settled for anything but the best.Cuthbert-Flynn earned double Olympic silver medals in the 100m and 200m at the 1992 Barcelona Games in Spain and copped bronze four years later in Atlanta, United States, as a member of Jamaica’s 4x100m women’s team.”I didn’t settle for second (1992 Olympics). It is what it is. Anything that I do, anyone who knows me knows that I am going to try to do the best that I can and not going to ever do anything half and half. Never!” she stressed.The 51-year-old on Thursday became Jamaica’s first Olympian to win a seat in Parliament.She emphatically upstaged two-time parliamentarian Paul Buchanan for the St Andrew West Rural constituency.Cuthbert-Flynn, running in her first election, polled 9,742 votes to Buchanan’s 7,517.ALWAYS CONFIDENT”I was always confident of victory because I was putting in the work. I was walking sometimes six, seven days a week, and I was walking for five to six hours a day. I walked off two pairs of sneakers. The bottoms fell off,” she told The Gleaner in an interview.Though many would consider her a celebrity and international star, Cuthbert-Flynn contends that she still joins lines in public places like banks and lives a low-key life.”Representing your country in track and field, it’s little bit different. I think it’s going to be little bit different representing the people of the country in Parliament because when you are running, you’re running for yourself in a lot of ways and the country gets the glory, but I think in this race and in this instance, it is a little bit different. It’s not just for me. It’s not really about me, It’s really about the people. That’s how I look at it,” she pointed out.Cuthbert-Flynn describes her journey in life as an Olympian and politician as an important one, one that has inspired and motivated people, but she adds that she now considers herself a public servant.”I think just seeing the things that I’ve seen on my journey, it gives me that extra push where I must give a hundred per cent and I must do for the people. I must work for the people. There is no half and half … I want to leave a legacy just like I have in track and field,” she remarked.”I have left a legacy in track and field that no one can ever take away from me. They can tell me that I got second, but I am in the history books forever and ever,” she added.last_img read more

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Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation accepting scholarship applications

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation (OCF) is offering several college scholarships available to beef industry youth. All scholarships recognize beef industry youth for academic effort, community service and career interests that utilize agriculture to enhance our quality of life through service education or research. Since the OCF was established, the number of available scholarships has increased due to the growing number of worthy applicants and committed supporters.Among the various scholarships, the most recently added is the Cattlemen’s Gala scholarship funded by the celebration and fundraiser event. The inaugural event raised $27,000 in its first year to be awarded to deserving youth.Established in 1995, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation’s (OCF) mission is to advance the future of Ohio’s beef industry by investing in research and education programs. OCF is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit, public charitable organization and is governed by a board of trustees with Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) leadership experience. Contributions are tax deductible as allowed by law and support the mission and programs of the Foundation. Financial support for the Foundation comes from individual donors, agricultural organizations and corporations / foundations.Any eligible applicant may download the applications and find more information at www.ohiocattle.org. Applications must be postmarked by Oct. 31.last_img read more

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How Advertisers Can Avoid Paying For Accidental Mobile Clicks

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Accidental clicks cost mobile advertisers tons of money. The key to minimizing the damage is to insist on transparency before bidding on ads.Earlier this week, we reported on a study that found 22% of clicks mobile advertisements were accidental. Although some ads that are viewed accidentally lead to purchases, the proportion is vanishingly small, leading to wasted ad budgets. Moreover, unintentional clicks cost not only the price of the ad impression, but also the cost of staff, connectivity, and the like. So we asked experts about the best ways for advertisers to avoid accidental clicks.User interface design can make a huge difference, of course. “Imagine if banner ads took up one-third of your PC [screen] and your mouse pointer was the size of a fist,” John Busby, vice president of the mobile advertising industry group the Marchex Institute, offers by way of analogy. “You’d make a ton of accidental clicks. If you’re looking through a list of, say, restaurants, it is very easy to click a link or phone number when you intended to scroll.”But good design is only part of the equation. Advertisers should make sure they won’t be charged for clicks the audience didn’t intend. “In mobile, the problem just may be using clicks as a pricing model,” Busby said. “The best way for marketers to ensure quality is to insist on paying for calls that can actually generate results, so mobile publishers should focus on new ways to measure engagement.”Advertisers need to manage their ad bids to account for accidental clicks, according to Alex Mizrahi of adMarketplace.com. “The good news is, this can be managed so the publisher, not the advertiser, incurs the cost of these accidental or fraudulent clicks,” he said. “We find that, by publisher, accidental clicks are mixed in with intentional clicks at a relatively stable rate. So if you can discount your bids by publisher to account for the accidental clicks, you can maintain your performance.”Daryl Colwell, vice president of business development at MediaWhiz, agrees. His firm, an integrated digital media agency, aggressively monitors the source of clicks and the resulting interaction, and insists on a high level of transparency to track that data when placing ads with mobile publishers.Adding technology that tracks results can be critical. At the very least, advertisers should insist on a list of sites where their ads will be published. “Layering on technology that enables us to track the source of calls, duration and result has made us smarter marketers on the mobile Web,” he said. “It’s allowed us to determine down to a very specific level which source(s) are providing the best results for us/our clients.”center_img Related Posts dave copeland Tags:#advertising#web last_img read more

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UEFA’s Ceferin tackles dangers in Europe, integrity attacks

first_imgNYON, Switzerland (AP) — Entering rooms at UEFA headquarters, Aleksander Ceferin still finds it startling and unsettling when staff leap from their seats to greet him. The deference of the Michel Platini era is proving hard to shake off for the officials running European football.“I don’t pretend to be a king here,” Ceferin says at the start of an interview with The Associated Press at the UEFA complex by the banks of Lake Geneva.Whereas Platini was one of the greats of the game, winning titles as captain of France and Juventus before becoming a football politician, most of Ceferin’s professional experience is in criminal law. As a relative novice to football administration, having led the Slovenian federation since only 2011, Ceferin won’t be treated in awe like Platini.“As a lawyer you learn how to (negotiate), trust me. I have had 15,000 clients in my career,” Ceferin said. “I represent the biggest sports organization in the world and we have some power.”The 49-year-old Ceferin emerged from relative obscurity to assume the reigns of the confederation which runs two of football’s biggest competitions — the Champions League and European Championship. Ceferin’s landslide UEFA election win last month was the latest twist in world football, where the established hierarchies were shaken by criminal investigations and ethics cases.A raid on FIFA headquarters by Swiss police in September 2015 paved the way for Ceferin’s victory. An improper payment of 2 million Swiss francs ($2 million) from FIFA to Platini in 2011 was uncovered, leading to a four-year ban from football being imposed . Platini was no longer eligible to succeed Sepp Blatter as FIFA president in February, and UEFA general secretary Gianni Infantino unexpectedly stood for election in his place and won.Although Michael van Praag, as a UEFA vice president and former FIFA candidate, was considered the favorite to replace Platini as head of European football, the Dutchman’s support drained to Ceferin.“It was now or never,” Ceferin said. “Those terrible things that happened in football, in a way helped my candidacy because people didn’t want to see establishment anymore, the same faces anymore. They really trust in the wind of change. And it’s a responsibility for me.”But questions about Ceferin’s integrity have overshadowed the opening weeks of his reign. He was forced to defend the scrupulousness of a 4 million euro-loan from UEFA to his federation long before he was a presidential candidate.“It was as clean as possible,” he said. “I expected some mosquito bites because some of the old guys were very disappointed by me being elected.”Ceferin’s mandate is overwhelming after being supported by 42 of UEFA’s 55 federations .“With such big support the disappointment is very big if you don’t do anything,” he said. “I have to use it.”DANGERS IN EUROPEUEFA’s “Say no to racism ” campaign has been prominent across Europe this week because, for all the fines and stadium closures, discriminatory incidents have not been eradicated from matches.“The problem was we just punished the association (or club) and collected money,” Ceferin said. “At the same time we have to educate people.”Ceferin was “surprised” FIFA decided to abolish its anti-racism task force last month, and has concerns that Europe is becoming “simply too dangerous.”“We are in specific sensitive position in Europe now,” he said. “Europe is not very safe. I’m not speaking just about potential terror attacks but right-wing extremists, all kind of extremists. You have seen that at the Euro in France. So we have to work on it.”In France in June, Russia was threatened with expulsion from Euro 2016 over fan violence.“It happened once and it won’t happen again,” Ceferin said, looking ahead to the 2018 World Cup in Russia, and St. Petersburg hosting Euro 2020 games. “I am almost convinced they will solve that problem.”Protecting the integrity of matches is a more complex challenge.“We should fight match fixing more aggressively because we haven’t done enough,” Ceferin said. “Match fixing is killing the game. The early warning system is not enough. We have to connect to police around Europe and to act with them.”FINANCIAL DISPARITIESCeferin inherits the flagship policy of Platini, who was implementing changes to the rules that punish clubs who spend more than they earn, when he was toppled from power.“Financial Fair Play is in principle working very well but it needs improvement,” Ceferin said. “It’s not ideal. Sustainability should be the main goal. It’s important to try to make the gap between the rich (clubs) and the poor ones closer.”Coming from a smaller federation, Ceferin hopes he can convince the “big rich clubs with their own interests … without each other we are all finished.” That is why he will resist any moves by the elite to establish a breakaway Super League, warning: “Without national leagues, football is dead.”AUTHORITY WITHOUT FEARIn the courts of Slovenia, the lawyer faced far more formidable figures than the bureaucrats he must now take on in negotiations over World Cup places for European teams, and the future of the Champions League . Despite projecting a no-nonsense and forthright demeanor, Ceferin talks of a collegiate leadership style.“If you trust people and people believe in you, it’s the strongest leadership,” Ceferin said. “If they are scared then it will not be productive. At the same time we all know who is in charge, but I don’t want to show that in a primitive way: To shout.”Ceferin is, however, determined to shake up the system. Unspecified term limits for top executives will be imposed, following changes at FIFA where council members can now serve only three four-year terms. Ceferin is hoping for “new blood” on the executive committee and only candidates who are serving in leading positions at their federations.Four of UEFA’s representatives on the FIFA Council will have to seek re-election in April. The two longest-serving, Michel D’Hooghe of Belgium (29 years) and Senes Erzik of Turkey (21 years) have said they will retire. Marios Lefkaritis of Cyprus, and Russian deputy prime minister Vitaly Mutko have held their positions for 10 and eight years respectively.“When you are there for 15-20 years you become sleepy, and think about your limousines and your suites,” Ceferin said. “The worst thing is at the end you think you own the organization and you don’t have to answer to anybody.”Ceferin has less than three years until he has to answer to the UEFA electorate again — if he seeks a second term in 2019.“I am not afraid,” he says of the challenges ahead.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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Eddie Jones feels chill of the fans after uncomfortable defeat by Ireland

first_imgIreland rugby union team Support The Guardian Reuse this content Share via Email Six Nations 2018 … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Eddie Jones insists England are ‘moving forward’ despite Ireland defeat Since you’re here… England rugby union team features Sportblog Rugby union Share on Messenger Ireland’s Joe Schmidt relieved to seal Grand Slam with win over England – video England 15-24 Ireland: how the Six Nations players at Twickenham rated Pinterest Read more Maro Itoje shouts instructions to his England team-mates. Photograph: MB Media/Getty Images Twitter Topics The scoreline, 24-15, was ugly enough but it still flattered Jones’s side, who forced their way into the game only once it was all but over, their last try a late gloss on a game in which they had been entirely out-played. “These things are sent to test you,” Jones said afterwards, “to test your resolve, to test your purpose, to test the character of your team.” He was talking about the defeat but he seemed about 80 minutes late.The real test of his team’s resolve, purpose and character started when the referee blew the first whistle, not the final one. And England failed it. Read more Earlier in the week Jones spoke about how much he loved pressure. “It’s the best time in rugby, when you are under the pump and you have got to produce it.”He believes you should leave those little loose stones in your shoes. “Players like to get comfortable,” he said last year.“They like to have a nice house, drive a Range Rover, like to do the same thing every day in training. To get them to have the courage to try to be different is the biggest trick. Encouraging them to do that consistently, to be different, don’t be comfortable, be uncomfortable.”Jones has spent the past two years pushing this team to be uncomfortable. He thinks the 4×4 in the driveway is the modern sportsman’s pram in the hall. Seven points down, England decided to kick a penalty to the corner soon afterwards, squandering a shot at goal that they really could not afford to spare.The next time they had to make a similar decision the deficit had been doubled. They were 14-0 down after their defence had been unstitched by CJ Stander after Sexton’s dummy wrap-around.England kicked four penalties to the corner, to try to push their way over.The last attempt was when Ireland were down to 14 men, after Peter O’Mahony had been sent to the sin-bin. But they still could not do it. They were as enthusiastic as they were ineffective.This was in sharp contrast with the rapier finishing of Jacob Stockdale, who settled the game when he chased down his own chip, grounding it just before he slid over the deadball line.Jones had only just had that line moved back, because his team wanted more space in which to play. “When you’re having a bad run,” he said, “everything goes wrong.”After the game Jones was booed by the Twickenham crowd during his post-match interview.“Our effort was outstanding. We played with character and we stuck at it,” Jones said, “and we just weren’t good enough.”The World Cup is 18 months away. His words were cold comfort on a chilling day. Six Nations Facebook Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 0:50 Share on LinkedIn It was suffering weather. The kind of cold that makes you pull down your hat and stamp the ground, shuffle your feet and clench your teeth – fitting conditions, then, for an England team struggling through three defeats in a row.This latest, the first at home since Eddie Jones took over, stung like Saturday’s wind. It has been a long winter for England and there is not a hint of spring yet. There were certainly no green shoots to be seen at Twickenham, just green shirts – in front, on top, either side, and all around – Irishmen every last where you looked. Share on WhatsApp He flogs them physically – and sometimes mentally, too – to prepare them for games such as this one, a real bed-of-nails Test match.England had everything to prove, everything to play for, back home after back-to-back defeats, in a grand-slam match against an Irish side who have just overtaken them in the world rankings and one who robbed them, of course, of their own shot at the slam when they beat them in Dublin this time last year. On top of all this it was St Patrick’s day, too.It was a sobering one, as it turned out, for the English at least. They were blown away by an Irish side that were sharper, stronger and smarter. England kept coming, just as they did against France last week and Scotland before that, but again all that effort did not get them anywhere. Jones praised their spirit. But, to be honest, there was not a lot else he could pick out.The tone was set in the opening minutes, when Dylan Hartley and Kyle Sinckler both came at the Irish, charging hard heads down, and both were bounced back on their behinds. The Irish would not be bullied, did not bend or bow – and for most of the match England did not know where else to go.Ireland took control when Garry Ringrose pounced on a loose ball after Anthony Watson had fumbled a catch under a high kick from Johnny Sexton.Perhaps there was a hint of a knock-on from Rob Kearney, as he was challenging Watson for the ball, but not enough to sway the TMO. Play Videolast_img read more

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