Added security for NRL match

first_imgTop-flight sport returns to the city on Saturday when Manly stage a “home” match at Christchurch Stadium a fortnight after the mass shootings at two mosques which claimed 50 lives.New Zealand has been placed on a high threat alert since and police have reminded event organisers nationwide to be aware that a proliferation of memorial events has the potential to stretch law enforcement resources.However, a large police presence remains in Christchurch and will be out in force at Friday’s National Remembrance Service at Hagley Park.Match promoter Justin Wallace told journalists there would be increased police numbers at Saturday’s game and that both teams were also bringing their own bolstered security staff.It didn’t stop New Zealand Police issuing a note of caution through a media statement on Thursday.”The public is asked to continue their vigilance and report suspicious activity,” the statement read.”Police advise anyone attending events to stay alert and be aware of your surroundings.”New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern welcomed the high-profile nature of an NRL match in a city still grieving.”Safety is of course our focus … but the ability to come together at times like this, to form a community, whether or not it’s around sport or anything else, I think is an important part of recovery,” she said on Thursday.Wallace revealed a group of Christchurch medical emergency staff and first responders to the attack would be honoured on the field before kickoff.Both teams will walk from the tunnel together and observe a minute’s silence.last_img read more

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Chavez throwing oil cash around to help burnish image in area

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CARACAS, Venezuela – President Hugo Chavez is spending billions of dollars of his country’s oil windfall on pet projects abroad, aimed at setting up his leftist government as a political counterpoint to the conservative Bush administration in the region. With Venezuela’s oil revenues rising 32 percent last year, Chavez has been subsidizing diverse items such as samba parades in Brazil, eye surgery for poor Mexicans and even heating fuel for poor families from Maine to the Bronx to Philadelphia. By some estimates, the spending now surpasses the nearly $2 billion Washington allocates annually to pay for development programs and the drug war in western South America. The new spending has given more power to a leader who has been provocatively building a bulwark against what he has called American imperialistic aims in Latin America. Chavez frequently derides Bush and his top aides. In March, he called Bush a “donkey,” a “drunkard” and a “coward,” daring him to invade the country. But with the biggest oil reserves outside the Middle East, Chavez is more than an irritant. He is fast rising as the next Fidel Castro, a hero to the masses who is intent on opposing every move the United States makes, but with an important advantage. “He’s managed to do what Fidel Castro never could,” said Stephen Johnson, a scholar at the conservative Heritage Foundation. “Castro never had an independent source of income the way Chavez does. Chavez is filling a void that Castro left for him, leading nonaligned nations.” It remains unclear exactly how much the government has spent, because the state oil giant, Petroleos de Venezuela, has not made detailed financial records public, and its balance sheets have been shielded from independent audits. Mega-projects, such as Chavez’s utopian plan of building a gas pipeline through the Amazon from Venezuela to Argentina, are not likely to materialize. But Johnson estimates that Venezuela pledged $3 billion in aid last year to its neighbors, including generous bond purchases that made the government a lender of last resort across the continent. The Center of Economic Investigations, an economic consulting firm in Caracas, issued a study recently that said Chavez had spent more than $25 billion abroad since taking office in 1999, about $3.6 billion a year, while First Justice, a leading opposition party, put the figure at $16 billion, based on Chavez’s own declarations. What is clear is that upward of 30 countries as far away as Indonesia have received some form of aid or preferential deals. His government has purchased $2.5 billion in Argentine debt, the Venezuelan finance minister, Nelson Merentes, recently said, and was selling oil at cut-rate prices to 13 Caribbean countries and buying a big stake in Uruguayan gas stations. Critics see the spending as a reckless exercise in populist decadence intended to burnish Chavez’s image as the region’s leading statesman while embarrassing the Bush administration, the Venezuelan leader’s principal obsession since American officials gave tacit support to a failed coup against him in 2002. Chavez is “spending considerable sums involving himself in the political and economic life of other countries in Latin America and elsewhere, this despite the very real economic development and social needs of his own country,” said John Negroponte, the American director of national intelligence.last_img read more

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