Hughes ‘lines up £4m bid for Wolves keeper’

first_imgMark Hughes has pencilled in a £4m bid to take Wolves goalkeeper Wayne Hennessey to QPR, the Daily Star say.Manager Hughes is said to be planning to table an offer for the 25-year-old if Rangers stay up and Wolves are relegated.Hughes knows the Wales international well and is tipped to make a move for him as soon as the season ends.Meanwhile, Manchester City are reported to be planning to re-sign Daniel Sturridge from Chelsea in the summer.There has been speculation about Sturridge’s future for some time and the Manchester Evening News say City, who sold him to Chelsea three years ago, want to take him back to Eastlands.David Luiz has reportedly been ruled out of Wednesday’s Champions League semi-final clash with Barcelona and is likely to miss the second leg too.The Chelsea defender was declared doubtful for this week’s game after being carried off with a hamstring injury during the FA Cup victory over Tottenham at Wembley on Sunday.The Sun say Luiz will definitely miss Barca’s visit to Stamford Bridge as well as this weekend’s vital league game against Arsenal – and is unlikely to be fit in time for the Blues’ trip to the Nou Camp.And ex-Chelsea striker Nicolas Anelka has reiterated his desire to see Blues star Didier Drogba join him at Chinese club Shanghai Shenhua along with former Paris St-Germain man Selim Benachour.The Sun quote Anelka as saying: “I hope Benachour and Drogba will quickly join us.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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No Salt, Please: Europa Life Needs It Bland

first_imgSalt may taste good on human food, but for life trying to emerge in the sea, it is toxic.  Astrobiologists have long wondered if life could exist at Jupiter’s moon Europa, where an ocean is believed to exist miles deep under the icy crust.  They must have been presuming the water is pure, but an article on Astrobiology Magazine, a NASA website, says that Europa’s ocean could be saturated with salt.The amount of salts in the ocean also could be stressful for life.  [Kevin] Hand [Jet Propulsion Laboratory] says the Galileo magnetometer results indicate Europa’s ocean could be nearly saturated in either sodium chloride or magnesium sulfate.    “If you’ve got a salt-saturated ocean, that doesn’t bode well for the origin of life,” says Hand.  “Some of the processes that lead toward the generation of polymers or the stringing together of genetic base pairs are inhibited by high salt concentrations.  That said, there are terrestrial halophiles, salt-loving microbes, that could survive in the ocean we propose.”Terrestrial (earth-based) halophiles (salt-lovers), however, did not originate in a salty sea, according to evolutionary theory.  Presumably, they developed the ability to deal with salt long after life arose.Recall the 09/17/2002 paper that taught us to avoid salt at all costs when modeling the origin of life in a primordial soup.  Salt of any kind is very effective at dismembering fatty acids needed for cell membranes and preventing nucleotides from linking up (assuming they could even form in water; see 11/05/2004).  Monard et al had no answer, but just pointed out that this was a “crucial piece of information” for astrobiologists theorizing about how life might have formed in a random sea of chemicals.    Yet hope springs eternal.  You can almost hear the hand-wringing in the Astrobiology Magazine article.  They just admitted that the presence of salt does not bode well for the origin of life.  They’re thinking, But… if life DID originate somehow, maybe it could get along just like the halophiles on Earth manage to do.  Foul.  It didn’t.  Salt tosses life out of the equation.  You can’t get there from here.    While we’ve got them pinned to the floor, let’s put the squeeze on by asking another pertinent question.  What is the likelihood that the Earth’s early oceans, filled with runoff from the torrential rains and upheavals for two billion years after its hellish birth (11/01/2007), were pure and soft as spring waters?  Salt is bad for astrobiology here, too.  If salt was present, you may as well become a creationist now, because Charlie is out before he gets to the starting gate.  Sorry for the mixed metaphors of wrestling and horse racing, but you get the point.  Charlie’s horse may enjoy a salt lick, but salt licks astrobiology like a Charlie horse.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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‘Taches to fight prostate cancer

first_imgSouth African men are urged to grow theirfurriest, funkiest moustaches to spreadawareness for prostate cancer.(Image: Grow Your Mo’)MEDIA CONTACTS• Nelia BlumrickGrow Your Mo’ campaign+27 82 316 8535info@growyourmo.co.za RELATED ARTICLES• SA scientist leads cancer fight • Rooibos yoghurt fights cancer • Top award for Rhodes scientist • Vaccine hope for SA womenKhanyi MagubaneSouth African men are being encouraged to ditch their razors and grow their thickest, furriest moustaches to get people talking about prostate cancer, a highly stigmatised condition that affects one in every six men.The first-ever Grow Your Mo’ drive, a quirky initiative of the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), is intended to help protect men across South African by raising the public’s awareness of prostate cancer-related issues and generating support for the PCF’s cancer-fighting efforts.PCF is hoping that this humorous and light-hearted idea will help spread the message to as many man as possible in a non-threatening way.All proceeds raised by the campaign, which runs from 15 to 30 September 2009 to coincide with Prostate Awareness Month, will be donated to the PCF.Campaign coordinator Nelia Blumrick says the drive got off to a great start: “This is the first time we’ve launched such a campaign. It’s actually been going really well, and once people started talking about it, it really started picking up.”“We started out by putting up the [Grow Your Mo’] Facebook group, and then the website, and then it started spreading by word of mouth,” says Blumrick.The campaign encourages participants to submit photos of their manly facial hair to the Grow Your Mo’ website and enter the Best mo’ on show competition. The best moustache each week during the 15-day campaign will be displayed for all to see in the Man of the Mo’ment frame on the site.“Every aspect of ‘Mo’-craft’ will be taken into account: length, shape, colour, grooming, luxuriance, novelty and so forth. The men who make names for themselves in this competition will go down in history as some of the finest specimens humanity has ever produced,” reads the website.At the end of the month there will be grand prize-winner, although the booty is being kept a secret.For those not so keen to sprout their whiskers, there’s a Mo money draw, which can be entered by sending a text message with your name to 40026 – the number is applicable only in South Africa, though. Messages cost R20 (US$2.69), which will be donated to PCF. Alternatively you can send a cash pledge to the organisation, the banking details of which are on the website.The campaign can also be followed on the social networking site, Twitter.What is prostate cancer?According to PCF, prostate cancer is the leading cancer among men in South Africa and more than 4 000 men are diagnosed with it every year.It occurs when cells within the prostate – a gland in the male reproductive system – grow uncontrollably and form a number of small tumours.If caught early surgery or radiation can effectively eliminate the tumours, but in its early stages the cancer produces few or no symptoms and can be difficult to detect.If untreated and allowed to grow, the cells from the tumours can spread in a process called metastasis. Prostate cancer cells are transported through the lymphatic system and the bloodstream to other parts of the body, where they lodge and grow secondary tumours.Once the cancer has spread beyond the prostate, chances of it being treated successfully are reduced.Early detection vitalAbnormal cell growth in the prostate can be detected early if men go for regular medical check-ups, where a digital rectal exam or Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test is carried out.If a blood sample reveals high levels of PSA, a protein produced in the prostate, there could be cause for concern.PCF says it’s unfortunate that men often know more about breast cancer than they do about prostate cancer, as it’s not as widely publicised.“I think most men are aware of it, but they don’t want to talk about it, because it has to do with their genital parts. I think if it were any other part of the body, it would be easier to talk about,” Blumrick adds.The older the man, the more susceptible he is to prostate cancer. In the US more than 65% of cases are found in men over the age of 65. Men who have had a parent or brother with prostate cancer, and those with a poor diet and lifestyle, are also more at risk.Although there are no clear-cut signs of prostate cancer, PCF says men should see a doctor promptly if the following symptoms occur:• A need to urinate frequently, especially at night• Difficulty starting urination or holding back urine• Weak or interrupted flow of urine• Painful or burning urination• Difficulty in having an erection• Painful ejaculation• Blood in urine or semen, or• Frequent pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips or upper thighs.last_img read more

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Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation accepting scholarship applications

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation (OCF) is offering several college scholarships available to beef industry youth. All scholarships recognize beef industry youth for academic effort, community service and career interests that utilize agriculture to enhance our quality of life through service education or research. Since the OCF was established, the number of available scholarships has increased due to the growing number of worthy applicants and committed supporters.Among the various scholarships, the most recently added is the Cattlemen’s Gala scholarship funded by the celebration and fundraiser event. The inaugural event raised $27,000 in its first year to be awarded to deserving youth.Established in 1995, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation’s (OCF) mission is to advance the future of Ohio’s beef industry by investing in research and education programs. OCF is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit, public charitable organization and is governed by a board of trustees with Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) leadership experience. Contributions are tax deductible as allowed by law and support the mission and programs of the Foundation. Financial support for the Foundation comes from individual donors, agricultural organizations and corporations / foundations.Any eligible applicant may download the applications and find more information at www.ohiocattle.org. Applications must be postmarked by Oct. 31.last_img read more

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What’s Wrong with the Home-Energy Audit Industry?

first_imgAs satisfying as it is to build new high-performance homes, I have to admit that if I really cared about stopping global warming and conserving energy I’d refocus my company to perform home energy audits and work that would stop the outrageous waste of energy in our existing housing stock. The reason I don’t do this is mostly because I’m having so much fun building new homes, but it’s also because I don’t see how energy audits can be done in a way that would make a profit.Until recently, I could assuage my guilt by recommending that people in existing homes call one of the larger Energy Star raters in our area. But now they have stopped performing energy audits on existing, occupied homes. It turns out that they couldn’t figure out how to make a profit at it, either. So here is the paradigm we are dealing with in North Carolina: If you want an energy audit performed on a home you are living in you most likely will have to deal with an auditor who is operating out of a beat-up truck and keeps his laptop and answering machine in his spare bedroom. You’ll call and if you’re lucky he’ll get back to you within the week, and maybe he’ll be able to get to your house within the month. He may or may not get your report and recommendations written up and returned to you, with an invoice, in a timely fashion.What is wrong with this picture? How can we fix it?Existing homes are MUCH more difficult to analyze and do meaningful blower door and duct blaster testing on than new construction. You’ve got furniture, clutter, and old plaster and paint to protect. The HVAC equipment may be 20 years old and not have any service manual. The bath fans and kitchen hoods are likely to be badly under-performing and require individual testing. You really can’t do a good job solo. And you’re not likely to get it done before lunch. At a minimum you need to plan for six hours onsite with two workers in a high liability environment and another two hours off-site typing up the report. The going rate for this is $600 to $800 and homeowners bitterly gripe about that minimal cost. Can you write a logical, sustainable business plan that has you sending employees into occupied homes (where they may knock over lamps or track mud on carpets) and has a coordinator to answer phones and to schedule visits and follow-up at this rate? The answer is no.How did we get in this fix?It’s the unintended consequence of well-intentioned actions once again. Back in the Carter administration we had “the moral equivalent of war” to save energy and we sent weatherization teams out into the homes of the poor and needy to help them stop wasting energy. We used a lot of low-paid, part-time, barely-insured do-gooders who were willing to work for cheap and forgo health insurance to be “part of the solution.” And they shut down and went away once the co-op subsidy dollars got thin.Can we create a new model where auditors actually earn $1,200 to $1,800 per audit and can afford to have a professional organization that pays taxes and insurance and can grow a professional crew of home energy auditors? That’s hard to do in a culture that is accustomed to valuing this as a nasty job that ought to be subsidized by the government or (I’m serious here) utility companies. Let’s put Exxon in charge of retrofitting Hummers to burn less gas while we’re at it and let’s set the rate low enough that they’re guaranteed to lose money.The market is trying to adapt. We’re seeing insulation and weatherization companies offer home energy audits. Seems logical enough: call one number and get the diagnosis and the prescription filled from the same source. But people who have no problem with the energy company doing the energy audit somehow are more likely to see a conflict of interest in having an insulation company do it. My dad used to say, “If all you have is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail,” and that concern is justified.But what we have isn’t working. The public expects energy audits to be free or cheap and we have something like 75 million homes in desperate need of energy remediation to even get close to current watered down code requirements. Additionally we have thousands of homes ten years old and less that are wasting energy despite being built in compliance with the inadequate codes of their time. We need a new paradigm and we need it soon.In the commercial sector companies like Advanced Energy are going into existing factories and replacing outdated electric motors with new energy-efficient ones in exchange for a percentage of future fuel savings. I don’t see this working with home weatherization but we need to at least be thinking outside of the box here. Our electrical distribution system is at its limit. Even if we could build more electric plants we are losing the capacity to reliably move this additional power to where it is needed. So, as a society, our best investment is in energy conservation in our existing building stock, both residential and commercial. We’ll never get there if we ensure that building diagnosticians are underpaid and unable to make up for it by selling and installing the products they need to fix the problems they encounter.Somebody smarter than me needs to figure out how to lick this problem and get word to the next president as soon as possible so that we can start turning this ship around.—Michael Chandler is a builder, master plumber, and electrician near Chapel Hill, North Carolina. His website is www.ChandlerDesignBuild.comlast_img read more

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Using a satellite network to realize the full potential of the connected car

first_imgTags:#autonomous vehicles#connected car#driverless cars#Inmarsat#Internet of Things#IoT#Self-Driving Joel Schroeder Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… Related Posts IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A…center_img 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… The market for wireless connected devices is exploding. We know this. From garage doors to refrigerators to healthcare devices to alarm systems to pet products, it’s reasonable to expect that nearly everything we purchase in the future will have a chip and a platform.  How functional, viable and useful many of these devices will actually become in our day-to-day lives, however, is still up for debate. Debated less are the revenue opportunities associated with the connected device we use with the greatest frequency – our cars. The latest research suggests the connected car market will grow to just shy of $60 billion by 2021. GM alone already has 12 million connected cars on the road today. See also: Are connected cars only as good as your network?From infotainment to in-car Wi-Fi, the revenue possibilities are tantalizing and manufacturers are already seeking to capitalize. And while these services are certainly marketable to the consumer and potentially allow brands to distinguish themselves in a hotly competitive market, they are not necessarily transformational to the bottom line.The greatest revenue opportunities for manufacturers will come from the ability to conveniently service their fleets of vehicles from afar and own the relationship with the car owner long after the new car has been driven off the lot. 100 million lines of codeToday’s personal vehicle typically has over 100 million lines of software code. By comparison, the F-22 fighter jet has just 1.7 million. As is the case with your laptop computer, updates are required quite frequently to enhance performance and security. Today, each time an update is required, it means a trip to the dealer for the owner where hot coffee, free Wi-Fi and a usually longer than anticipated wait time awaits. If the manufacturer could instead update a connected vehicle’s internal software remotely over-the-air, the cost savings associated with warranty support and recalls would be dramatic. Certainly, the owner would appreciate a reduction in the number of annoying trips to the service station. This all sounds great in theory, but making it practical and realistic depends on access to a reliable and cost-efficient network. For early days connected services, manufacturers are relying primarily on terrestrial networks. But for the more advanced type capabilities such as OTA updates, satellite communications needs to be in the mix.Joel Schroeder, Vice President, Strategy & Business Development, InmarsatIt’s true; satellite communications has never been considered mainstream. It’s often thought of as a last resort due to costs, speed challenges and size of equipment. But things have changed, and satellite will be a strong player within the 5G “network of networks” as costs have come down and hardware has been reduced to the point where they can be embedded quite easily into any number of devices, including the automobile. Network reach is what rulesWhy does satellite have such an upside in the connected car arena? Let us count the ways. First, satellite’s broadcast capability makes it ideal for shooting out a single update to an entire fleet of vehicles at once via a single transmission. Does GM want to send one message to its 12 million connected cars or 12 million to each individual car? The efficiencies of satellite broadcast would save OEM’s millions in network usage costs. Second, while AT&T and Verizon may claim to be everywhere in the US, they are certainly not everywhere in the world. Satellite networks, on the other hand, are. They are global in nature, have much larger footprints and can reach a vehicle anywhere. Using a satellite network will eliminate the need for OEMs to negotiate and manage tricky international roaming agreements. Third, the advent of all these connected devices has also resulted in a much larger playground for hackers with nefarious intentions. While no network can claim to be completely impervious, the topology of a satellite network is inherently more secure as it operates as a private network that does not traverse the public Internet where there is a greater likelihood of intrusion.  With encryption technologies layered on top, satellites can offer even stronger protections for users.Finally, once the vehicle is connected to the satellite network – and the latest componentry now allows for easy embedding into shark fin antennas and internal control units – the potential then emerges for OEM’s to introduce, upsell and cross-sell a host of services that not only deliver new revenue streams but also allow for an enhanced relationship with the vehicle owner, something they have always craved.As the connected car market matures and education of satellite’s inherent advantages continues, expect to see satellite emerge as the preferred method of connectivity and the key component that will not only drive down costs for OEMs but truly transform the relationship between the automaker and car owner.The author is Vice President, Strategy & Business Development for Inmarsat’s Connected Car Program of Inmarsat’s Connected Car division, which is working with automotive suppliers and manufacturers to bring satellite connective to the next generation of connected vehicles. 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Adobe Premiere Pro: Applying Audio Effects to Multiple Tracks

first_imgUse the audio sub mix feature in Adobe Premiere Pro to apply audio effects to multiple tracks at once – a trick for working smarter, not harder!If you’re looking to speed up your workflow, improve consistency in the sound of your clips and better organize your audio, consider applying audio effects to submixes in Premiere Pro.  Submixes provide a quick and easy way for multiple audio clips (and tracks) to all use the same effects and filters.  Make one change to an effect and it will change all the audio clips associated with that submix.  Huge timesaver!In this Adobe Premiere Pro tutorial we’ll tackle:When to apply audio effects to multiple tracksUsing the Audio WorkspaceCreating a SubmixApplying audio effects to a SubmixWhen to Apply Audio Effects to Multiple Tracks in PremiereBefore we get into the details, lets talk about when you would need to apply audio effects to multiple tracks in Premiere Pro.Say that you have 2 tracks of  narration that you want to apply the same EQ to. The hard way would be to apply EQ to each clip on each track separately.The less hard way is to apply the effect to to each track, and the easiest is to apply the effect to a submit so the EQ effects multiple tracks.I tend to go ahead and make sub mixes in Premiere Pro even if I have just one audio track. That way if I do add multiple tracks later, the submit is already setup and I just assign the additional tracks.Using the Audio Workspace in Premiere ProUsing Premiere Pro’s workspaces save you time in that they set up a layout suited to specific tasks.  In this instace we’ll want to work with the Audio layout.Go to Window > Workspace> Audio. This workspace rearranges the layout, with the Audio Mixer on a tab with the Source Window and  the Project top left.Click on the triangle top left on the Audio Mixer to reveal the Effects and Sends panel.Creating a Submix in Premiere ProTo use the same effect on multiple Premiere Pro audio tracks, you create a submix and send both tracks to it, and apply the effect to the submix.For Audio 1, click in the Sends panel, and in the first slot click and select create stereo submix.Below that click on the Master pulldown and change it to submix 1.  Now Audio 1 is sent to submix 1.Repeat the steps to send other tracks to the submix.   Simple enough, right?  Now, let’s look at how to apply effects to submixes.Applying audio effects to a SubmixClick in the the top slot of the Effect panel (top left panel of the Audio Mixer) to add an Effect. (I added EQ).To adjust the EQ, double click  it to open the parameters for the EQ and adjust as needed (I rolled off the low and high end)You can add up to 5 effects and 5 submixes.  You can also rename your tracks and sub mixes as needed by clicking on their names (turns blue).Utilize the submix feature in Adobe Premiere Pro is a surefire way to make your editing more efficient!Got a Premiere Pro comment or tip to share?Let us know in the comments!last_img read more

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Mariam Pitchai, TN minister, dies in road accident

first_imgJaya’s cabinet suffers a loss as Mariam Pitchai pass away.Tamil Nadu Minister for Environment and Pollution Control and Minorities Welfare N Mariam Pitchai died in a road accident in Tiruvelangurichi, about 40 km from Tiruchirappalli, on Monday morning.Minister for Sports and Youth welfare N.R.Sivapathy was also injured when their vehicle collided with another moving ahead of their convoy while they were proceeding to Chennai after garlanding the statue of community leader Perumpidugumutharyar, police said.The body of Pitchai, aged 60, has been brought to Madurai.Pithchai, who was the councillor of Tiruchi corporation, had won from the Tiruchirappalli (West)constituency defeating former Transport Minister K.N.Nehru in the April 13 Assembly elections. – With PTI inputslast_img read more

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