Weather-perfect leaves

first_img“A wet spring and early summerfollowed by dry late summerand early fall are ideal for nature to paint a beautifulfall landscape,” said David Stooksbury, University ofGeorgia state climatologist. “Early cool weather in Octoberwill add more accent to nature’s pallet.”Historically the peak leaf color isreached between the 15thand 25th of October in the Georgia mountains. In thestate’spiedmont area, the peak color is usually reached between the20th and 31st of October.With cold fronts from Canada and theassociated windexpected to be more numerous this October, the date of peakcolor may be a little early this year because leaves arebeing blown off trees, Stooksbury said.last_img read more

Read More »

Turf Field Day

first_imgWhether you’re a golf course superintendent or a homeowner who wants the perfect lawn, there’ll be something for you at the University of Georgia Turfgrass Field Day.The field day is set for Thursday, August 12 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the University of Georgia’s campus in Griffin, Ga. Registration will be from 8 to 9 a.m. Come and get the latest information on how to care for your lawn or your golf course from UGA researchers and extension specialists. Field day topics include controlling turf insects like mole crickets and white grubs and turf pests like crabgrass and other turf weeds. The field day will also include information on newly released UGA turfgrasses including tall fescues that were bred especially for Georgia conditions. There will also be an update on the Seashore Paspaulum breeding program at UGA. This turfgrass is especially popular along the coast as it can be irrigated with salt water.The field day also includes a BBQ and chicken lunch and displays and demonstrations of the latest turfgrass industry equipment.The morning session of the field day from 9-11:30 a.m. will also be offered through a Spanish translated tour.For individuals needing pesticide recertification, the UGA Turfgrass Field Day has been certified for Georgia Pesticide License Credit hours in Categories 24 (Ornamentals and Turf), 21 (Plant Agriculture) and Private. Be sure to bring your license number with you for reporting purposes.Certified Crop Advisor credit will also be available for the Turfgrass Field Day. Credit in pesticide management and crop production will be allowed for those in attendance. Be sure to sign up on the appropriate form at the end of the field day to receive your credits. The cost of the field day is $35 for registrations received before July 30 and $50 for those received after July 30. Four or more participants registering as a group qualify for a 10 percent discount. You can register by credit card by calling the UGA Griffin Campus Continuing Education Office at (770) 229-3477 or by faxing your registration and credit card payment to (770) 233-6180. To register by mail, send your registration fee to the Office of Continuing Education, University of Georgia Griffin Campus, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Ga. 30223. Or just show up bright and early Thursday morning, August 12 and register on-site. For a complete field day schedule, check our website at www.georgiaturf.com.The field day will be held outdoors, rain or shine, so dress appropriately (bring sun screen and a cap).last_img read more

Read More »

DeKalb Mobile Market

first_img “There are plenty of kids in this neighborhood who don’t know what fruit looks like unless it comes out of a can,” said Antwoine Dunams, a frequent shopper at the DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market stop at the Austin Community Development Center on Austin Drive in Decatur, Georgia. “This a great asset for the families here.” Working with the DeKalb County Board of Health with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UGA Extension in DeKalb County launched a mobile farmers market to bring fresh produce to nine underserved neighborhoods across the county. “What we set out to do is increase people’s access to fresh fruits and vegetables, and we’ve accomplished that,” Townsend said. “People have told us that they’ve eaten more fruits and vegetables this summer because we were here, and that makes this a success.” For residents in some metro Atlanta neighborhoods, it can be impossible to find fresh produce because the closest well-stocked supermarket is geographically out of reach. Blackmon works to source almost all of the market’s produce from Georgia, but if that’s not possible, he makes sure that it is grown in the southeastern United States. This year’s market would not have been possible without the help of Sunbelt Produce at the Atlanta State Farmers Market. Traveling from site to site in a converted, mint green school bus, UGA Extension personnel meet with families and seniors across the county and offer them farm-fresh produce at market prices. A team at DeKalb County Public Works’ Fleet Maintenance Department retrofitted the mobile market bus, a hand-me-down from the DeKalb County Sherriff’s Department. A bus driver for the county’s Recreation, Parks and Cultural Affairs Department drives the bus and the DeKalb County Board of Health helps get the word out. This year’s successful market season is due to the cooperative nature of the project, said Jessica Hill, UGA Extension’s county coordinator for DeKalb County. While policymakers and advocates of healthy, quality food debate long-term solutions for the problem of food deserts in metro Atlanta and across the nation, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in DeKalb County spent the summer solving it one neighborhood at a time by bringing the produce to the people. center_img In contrast, the DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market offers shoppers market-priced produce with weekly suggestions on healthy meal preparation. The entire staff from the UGA Extension office in DeKalb County—from administrative assistants, to agriculture and natural resources agents, 4-H agents and family and consumer science agents—take turns to keep the mobile market rolling while maintaining their usual workloads, said Kelly Townsend, a 2015 student intern and the assistant market manager under the direction of Lynwood Blackmon, market manager. The DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market was paid for by a Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) project grant from the CDC, with a goal of reducing health disparities in certain communities. The mobile market will make its last run the week of Oct. 19-23. Those wanting to make one last shopping trip this season should visit dekalbcountyga.gov/mobilemarket/ . As of the end of September, 1,600 shoppers brought home more than 9,800 pounds of fresh produce from the market. It’s especially popular with seniors and people who pass the market on their way to and from work. The concept for the DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market is based loosely on UGA Extension’s success with the Fulton Fresh Mobile Market. That mobile market delivers fresh produce to underserved communities, along with a healthy dose of nutrition information. In that grant-funded program, participants receive bags of produce in exchange for attending nutrition classes. UGA Extension in DeKalb County, the Dekalb County Board of Health and the CDC will host a fall festival to close out the season from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 29, at the DeKalb County Extension office, located at 4380 Memorial Drive in Decatur, Georgia. The public is invited to help celebrate their success with food, games and half-price produce. For more information about how UGA Extension impacts communities across Georgia, visit extension.uga.edu.last_img read more

Read More »

Watering Rules

first_imgGeorgia soils are beyond parched and the Georgia Environmental Protection Division has now imposed Level 1 and Level 2 drought restrictions across the state. In some 110 counties, these outdoor watering restrictions are now being enforced to manage and conserve water usage during times like these, when much of central and north Georgia has been in continuous severe drought for more than 20 weeks. Fall is typically when homeowners make changes to their landscapes, like adding new plants and trees. “We are concerned that people will see the watering restrictions and think they can’t install new plant material,” said Mary Kay Woodworth, executive director of the Georgia Urban Ag Council.Both Level 1 and 2 drought response allow for irrigation of personal food gardens at any time of day, and new and replanted plants, seeds and turfgrass can be watered for 30 days after installation.“Conditions are bad now, but (Georgia’s green industry) hopes that normal rainfall will return during the winter months,” Woodworth said. The state’s green industry includes more than 7,000 landscape installation, design and management companies, golf courses, parks and recreation facilities, plant nurseries and garden centers, sod producers, tree care companies, suppliers, consultants and more.According to a 2015 report in the professional journal Horticulture Technology, the green industry in Georgia generated $4.5 billion in annual sales in 2013 and employed at least 100,000 people.The state’s water restrictions don’t prohibit green industry companies, and homeowners, from installing new plant materials this fall, the time of year that University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts deem ideal for putting in new material and pruning existing ones.“November, December and January are the best times to install plants,” Woodworth said. “Even if went to Level 3 (water restrictions), you are still allowed to water new installations for the first 30 days as needed.”UGA Extension horticulturists say that fall is the optimal time to install new landscape plants and trees to give them ample time to become established before spring. Woodworth says that the green industry professionals she works with strive to “conserve water and be efficient” whether there’s a drought or not.“We are encouraging homeowners to follow the watering rules for their counties,” she said. “You can water new plants for the first 30 days and then you apply water as necessary under Level 2 rules. Water only as needed. If it rains, hold off on supplemental irrigation!”UGA Extension horticulturists recommend letting plants, not watering rules, determine when plants need water. Watch for signs of moisture stress, such as wilt or rolling leaves. The right time to provide water is the first time you see these signs of plant stress.The recent cooler temperatures help plants because any water applied is evaporating at a much slower rate, said UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Clint Waltz. UGA Extension experts say the most efficient time to water is in the early morning, when losses from evaporation are less.Fall isn’t the time to install warm-season turfgrasses. “Drought or not, this is not a time to put down warm-season grasses. Think into next spring,” Waltz said. Current drought conditions will influence how warm-season turfgrasses “green up” in the spring.Fall is the ideal time to sod or seed cool-season turfgrass species, like tall fescue. But, Waltz says, tall fescue is not well adapted for all parts of Georgia. “I’m not sure adding water to any of the other grasses will do them any good anyway. After a few frost events, it’s pretty much game over for fall turfgrass lawns,” he said.Drought conditions in October, November and December, from a turfgrass perspective, are not “the worst thing in the world,” he said. Drought could cause turfgrass problems in May, June, July, August and September – the growing season for most Georgia lawns.last_img read more

Read More »

Peanut Rotations

first_imgFarmers may have more success growing peanuts if they don’t continuously plant peanuts in the same field, according to Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia Tifton campus’s research cropping system agronomist for peanuts.Tubbs has studied the impact of peanut rotation since 2008. Instead of growing peanuts in a field for consecutive years, called “continuous peanut rotation,” he believes that Georgia growers should plant a rotation of crops in each field, allowing time to avoid the buildup of diseases, nematodes and other pest problems.In research conducted at UGA-Tifton, Tubbs recorded a decrease in yields by as much as 2,000 pounds per acre during continuous peanut rotation. In this specific trial, the decline in yields was caused by the buildup of root-knot nematodes.The peanut root-knot nematode affects the roots of peanut plants, where the nematodes lay eggs. This causes the plant to swell and results in yield loss. If peanuts are rotated with another row crop like cotton or corn, instances of root-knot nematode decline and peanut yields increase. The longer the crop rotations are sustained, the more effective the peanut crop will be.“Our numbers for peanut root-knot nematode decreased when going from a one-year (or continuous) rotation to a two-year rotation, where we put one crop in between peanut crops,” Tubbs said. “We reduced the number of peanut root-knot nematodes by half. If you take it out to a three-year rotation, where you grow two crops in between peanut crops, we actually reduced peanut root-knot nematodes by 90 percent.”A four-year rotation by Tubbs, where three crops were planted between peanuts crops and peanuts were grown once every four years, reduced peanut root-knot nematodes by 97 to 99 percent.“Rotating other crops with peanuts prevents peanut root-knot nematodes simply because it alternates the host,” Tubbs said.Georgia peanut farmers are planning their 2018 crop now. The planting window ranges from late April to late May.There have been extreme fluctuations in peanut acreage in recent years, from a 90-year low of 430,000 acres in 2013 to last year’s 840,000 acres, a 25-year high, according to the “UGA Peanut Production Quick Reference Guide.”“Acreage has been more consistent in the last three years, but consistently high,” Tubbs said. “This has put a strain on maintaining recommended crop rotations for peanuts.”For more information on crop rotation, visit the UGA Extension publications website at extension.uga.edu/publications.html.last_img read more

Read More »

Vermont Council for Quality Conference

first_imgThe Vermont Council for Quality, partnering with the Vermont Manufacturing Extension Center, will hold their 2004 Fall Quality Conference on September 27, 2004 at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center in South Burlington. The purpose of the conference is to bring together a cross section of Vermont organizations to discuss how to implement performance excellence and continuous improvement measures to enhance an organizations efficiency, profitability and success.The conference will include panelists from Manufacturing, Health Care, Small Business and Education to share their success stories and lessons learned. The afternoon will spotlight best practices in Balanced Scorecard, Outcome Based Planning, Action Planning, and Information and Knowledge Management. Mark Blazey, author of Insights to Performance Excellence will be the keynote speaker. Governor Jim Douglas and Commissioner Michael Quinn of the Vermont Department of Economic Development have both been invited to speak. Commissioner Quinn will speak on high performing Vermont organizations and their effect on the Vermont economy. Founded in 1996, the Vermont Council for Quality is a non-profit that helps Vermont organizations improve their performance and competitiveness. VCQs services include a comprehensive organizational assessment that identifies strengths and improvement opportunities and serves as the foundation for the Vermont Council for Quality Award process, which is based on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Criteria. In addition, VCQ provides education and training, and serves as a resource referral for information, knowledge and sharing of best practices within and between Vermont organizations. For more information, please visit www.VermontQuality.org(link is external) or call 802) 655-1910.last_img read more

Read More »

Regional public transportation district recommended

first_imgREGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION DISTRICT RECOMMENDEDProposal would change funding of public transportation in VermontSOUTH BURLINGTON, VT — A task force of the Chittenden County Metropolitan Planning Organization (CCMPO) has recommended a new Regional Public Transportation District for Chittenden County as part of a proposal that would change the way public transportation in Vermont is funded and governed.The initial recommendations of the Regional Public Transportation Initiative Task Force call for legislation that would authorize a Regional Public Transportation District to plan, implement, and manage public transportation in Chittenden County. An interim board of this District would develop detailed governance and funding proposals and report back to the legislature for final approval before a public vote on the issue. The recommendations also provide a mechanism for creating up to five other Districts throughout the State.The Task Force will seek public comment on the recommendations through a series of community meetings in the coming months, and will present the proposal to the Boards of the CCMPO and the Chittenden County Transportation Authority (CCTA) for approval this fall. Final adoption of the recommendations is scheduled for October.”A workable public transportation system is a crucial factor for strong economic development,” said William Knight, Executive Director of the CCMPO. “This proposal will make it easier for people to get to work, help businesses attract and retain employees, and allow service to expand to some major economic centers, as well as help preserve and protect our cherished natural resources.”A key element of the Regional Public Transportation Initiative’s proposal is decreased reliance on the property tax as a means of funding public transportation. The Task Force recommends the creation of a dedicated fund for public transportation within the State Transportation Fund.The Task Force recommends making monies available by reducing the maximum amount of transportation-generated funds that can be appropriated outside the Agency of Transportations budget. In addition, the proposal would give Regional Public Transportation Districts regional taxing authority with voter approval to levy other taxes and fees on such items as motor vehicle fuel, short-term car rentals, and vehicle registration.This proposal is a regional solution to a regional problem, said Dave Davis, Vice Chair of the Task Force and Chair of the CCTA Board of Commissioners. Vermonters travelbetween towns and counties to work, shop, and attend school, but we cant design services to address that reality because were tied to town-by-town funding through the local property tax. A regional district will serve more people, places, and businesses with greater efficiency.The Regional Public Transportation Initiative is a collaboration between the CCMPO and CCTA, with additional representatives from the business, senior, disabled, and environmental communities. The Task Force has been coordinating its efforts with the Vermont Agency of Transportation, county Regional Planning Commissions, and public transportation providers throughout the region.For more information, or to submit comments, visit the CCMPO website, http://www.ccmpo.org/ptp(link is external).For additional information, contact:CCMPO: William Knight, Executive DirectorP: (802) 660-4071 ext 15F: (802) 660-4079wknight@ccmpo.org(link sends e-mail)CCTA: Dave Davis, Chair, Board of Commissioners and Vice Chair, Task Force P: (802) 864-0211 F: (802) 864-5564Press Contact: Emily J. StebbinsP: (802) 324-4345F: (831) 604-9532emily@stridecreative.com(link sends e-mail)###last_img read more

Read More »

Chittenden Bank trims Vermont workforce, closes five branches

first_imgChittenden Bank trims Vermont workforce, closes five branchesPeople’s United Financial, which operates Chittenden Bank, is cutting 71 Vermont employees and closing five local branches in an attempt to save $57 million in company expenses, excluding severance costs. The company will close 20 branches and 420 positions company wide throughout the New England region. Vermont branches in Bennington, Brattleboro, Arlington, West Dover, and on Bank Street in Burlington will close within a month to 90 days, leaving only two Chittenden Banks in each community. The closures will decrease Chittenden’s branch count in Vermont from 52 to 47. The layoffs included eliminating 20 vacant positions, 14 jobs through attrition, and 37 lay-offs, most of which were teller and other entry level positions. Before the cuts, a total of 1,158 employees were part of Chittenden Bank’s Vermont workforce. People’s United financial has over $21 billion in assets with over 300 branches throughout Vermont, New York, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. The cuts were expected after People’s United Financial finalized their acquisition of Chittenden Bank last summer.last_img read more

Read More »

MyWebGrocer brings grocery shopping to Google phone

first_imgMyWebGrocer of Colchester, Vermont, and Big in Japan have partnered to bring timely and relevant product data and advertising to the Google Android Platform. ShopSavvy, Big in Japan s popular price comparison application, utilizes MyWebGrocer s grocery data to help consumers find relevant products and pricing at their local grocery retailers.Using any Google Android phone, shoppers can scan a barcode found on any grocery product and are instantly shown product results from ShopSavvy. These results include prices on the web and at local stores, consumer reviews, an option to save the product to their wish list and to sign up for results when the price changes on the item. As consumers are grocery shopping, from the palm of their hand they will be able to see information that they traditionally had to get from newspaper circulars or direct mail. We re thrilled to be partnering with a mobile leader like Big in Japan, said Alec Newcomb, MyWebGrocer s Vice Presdient. Customer response to ShopSavvy in the US has been incredible, and we are excited about being able to provide relevant and timely information on the 800,000 branded products across our 95 Grocery Retailers. Grocery data has been a challenge for ShopSavvy from the very start. More than 25% of ShopSavvy users have scanned more than a million grocery items with limited success over the past year, said Alexander Muse co-founder of Big in Japan. Our partnership with MyWebGrocer means users can finally access real-time pricing and inventory for hundreds of thousands of grocery related items.MyWebGrocer is currently live on ShopSavvy and relevant CPG Advertising is being deployed this quarter on the application. About MyWebGrocer:MyWebGrocer is the leading digital services provider for retail grocery, connecting retail brands to their consumers through ecommerce and online tools.  Retail partners include Shoprite, Lowes Food Stores, Big Y, Food Lion and 90 other leading grocery chains. MyWebGrocer has the largest online grocery-advertising network with 3.8 Million monthly shoppers, attracting advertisers such as Kellogg s, Unilever, Nestle, P&G and 60 other leading brands. For more information please visit MyWebGrocer.com or call 1-888-662-2284.About Big in Japan:Big in Japan builds cool applications for mobile devices, including Apple s award winning iPhone and Google s open source Android platform, think of us as the mobile idea factory. Our latest application ShopSavvy ¢ won Google s Android Developer Challenge and is available on T-Mobile s G1 Google Android phone. Big in Japan is not just a development shop, they manage and support applications for millions of users for major brands including FX Network and LEGO.Source: MyWebGrocer. June 15th 2009 Colchester, VTlast_img read more

Read More »

TD Charitable Foundation donates $27,200 in Chittenden County

first_imgTD Bank, through the TD Charitable Foundation, recently donated a total of over $27,200 to local organizations in Chittenden County as part of the bank’s commitment to giving back to the community. The following organizations received a donation from the TD Charitable Foundation:§ Cancer Patient Support Program, Inc., (CPSP) which provides professional support services to cancer patients and family members with the goal of enhancing the quality of life during the diagnosis, treatment and recovery process. CPSP will use the funds from the TD Charitable Foundation in support of free psychological services, nutritional counseling and an emergency fund for cancer patients and their families. § Burlington Supportive Housing Initiatives, Inc., (BSHI) which strengthens the Chittenden County community by supporting affordable housing opportunities and helping low-income people living in subsidized housing improve their quality of life through personal and economic self-sufficiency. BSHI will use the funds from the TD Charitable Foundation in support of the Money Camp Financial Literacy Program which provides children with the opportunity to become more financially literate and provides the power to make sound financial decisions in the future.A staunch commitment to active involvement in the local community is a vital element of the TD Bank philosophy. TD Bank provides financial and other support to affordable housing initiatives, education and financial literacy, and the environment, many of which focus on improving the welfare of children and families.About the TD Charitable FoundationThe TD Charitable Foundation is the charitable giving arm of TD Bank N.A., which operates as TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®, and is one of the 15 largest commercial banking organizations in the United States. The Foundation’s mission is to serve the individuals, families and businesses in all the communities where TD Bank operates, having made over $56 million in charitable donations since its inception in 2002. The efforts of the Foundation are coordinated locally through TD Bank’s community relations departments and are focused on the areas of affordable housing, education and financial literacy, and the environment. More information on the TD Charitable Foundation, including an online grant application, is available at www.TDBank.com(link is external).About TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is one of the 15 largest commercial banks in the United States with $142 billion in assets, and provides customers with a full range of financial products and services at more than 1,000 convenient locations from Maine to Florida. TD Bank, N.A., is headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J., and Portland, Maine. TD Bank is a trade name of TD Bank, N.A. For more information, visit www.tdbank.com(link is external).   TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is a member of TD Bank Financial Group of Toronto, Canada, a top 10 financial services company in North America and one of the few banks in the world rated Aaa by Moody’s.Source: January 22, 2010 – Burlington, Vt. – TD Bank ###last_img read more

Read More »