Jeremy Shamos, Kate Walsh & More Set for If I Forget

first_img Related Shows Star Files View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on April 30, 2017 If I Forgetcenter_img The cast is now set for the premiere of If I Forget, a new play by Dear Evan Hansen book writer Steven Levenson. Among those taking center stage in the Roundabout off-Broadway production are Tony nominees Jeremy Shamos and Maria Dizzia, as well as TV favorite Kate Walsh.The Daniel Sullivan-helmed staging will begin performances on February 2, 2017 at the Laura Pels Theatre at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre, where it is set to open officially on February 22. The cast will also feature Tony nominee Larry Bryggman (Proof), Tasha Lawrence (Good People), Gary Wilmes (Chinglish) and Seth Steinberg in his New York stage debut.Shamos most recently appeared on Broadway in Noises Off; his additional credits include a Tony-nominated performance in Clybourne Park, as well as Glengarry Glen Ross and The Assembled Parties. Dizzia earned a Tony nomination for In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) and recently starred in The Layover off-Broadway. Walsh starred as Dr. Addison Montgomery in Private Practice and Grey’s Anatomy; her additional credits include The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Bad Judge.The play takes place in July 2000, immediately following the failed Israeli-Palestinian peace talks at Camp David. Three adult siblings (Shamos, Dizzia and Walsh) and their families gather in a D.C. suburb of DC for their father’s 75th birthday. When it’s revealed that the middle son, a Jewish studies professor, is at work on a book that is both dedicated to his Jewish WWII veteran father and argues an incendiary point about American Jews, Israel, and the Holocaust, familial responsibility quickly resorts to familial resentment.The production will feature set design by Derek McLane, costumes by Jess Goldstein and lighting design by Kenneth Posner. Jeremy Shamos(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Gary Wilmeslast_img read more

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Weather-perfect leaves

first_img“A wet spring and early summerfollowed by dry late summerand early fall are ideal for nature to paint a beautifulfall landscape,” said David Stooksbury, University ofGeorgia state climatologist. “Early cool weather in Octoberwill add more accent to nature’s pallet.”Historically the peak leaf color isreached between the 15thand 25th of October in the Georgia mountains. In thestate’spiedmont area, the peak color is usually reached between the20th and 31st of October.With cold fronts from Canada and theassociated windexpected to be more numerous this October, the date of peakcolor may be a little early this year because leaves arebeing blown off trees, Stooksbury said.last_img read more

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Regional public transportation district recommended

first_imgREGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION DISTRICT RECOMMENDEDProposal would change funding of public transportation in VermontSOUTH BURLINGTON, VT — A task force of the Chittenden County Metropolitan Planning Organization (CCMPO) has recommended a new Regional Public Transportation District for Chittenden County as part of a proposal that would change the way public transportation in Vermont is funded and governed.The initial recommendations of the Regional Public Transportation Initiative Task Force call for legislation that would authorize a Regional Public Transportation District to plan, implement, and manage public transportation in Chittenden County. An interim board of this District would develop detailed governance and funding proposals and report back to the legislature for final approval before a public vote on the issue. The recommendations also provide a mechanism for creating up to five other Districts throughout the State.The Task Force will seek public comment on the recommendations through a series of community meetings in the coming months, and will present the proposal to the Boards of the CCMPO and the Chittenden County Transportation Authority (CCTA) for approval this fall. Final adoption of the recommendations is scheduled for October.”A workable public transportation system is a crucial factor for strong economic development,” said William Knight, Executive Director of the CCMPO. “This proposal will make it easier for people to get to work, help businesses attract and retain employees, and allow service to expand to some major economic centers, as well as help preserve and protect our cherished natural resources.”A key element of the Regional Public Transportation Initiative’s proposal is decreased reliance on the property tax as a means of funding public transportation. The Task Force recommends the creation of a dedicated fund for public transportation within the State Transportation Fund.The Task Force recommends making monies available by reducing the maximum amount of transportation-generated funds that can be appropriated outside the Agency of Transportations budget. In addition, the proposal would give Regional Public Transportation Districts regional taxing authority with voter approval to levy other taxes and fees on such items as motor vehicle fuel, short-term car rentals, and vehicle registration.This proposal is a regional solution to a regional problem, said Dave Davis, Vice Chair of the Task Force and Chair of the CCTA Board of Commissioners. Vermonters travelbetween towns and counties to work, shop, and attend school, but we cant design services to address that reality because were tied to town-by-town funding through the local property tax. A regional district will serve more people, places, and businesses with greater efficiency.The Regional Public Transportation Initiative is a collaboration between the CCMPO and CCTA, with additional representatives from the business, senior, disabled, and environmental communities. The Task Force has been coordinating its efforts with the Vermont Agency of Transportation, county Regional Planning Commissions, and public transportation providers throughout the region.For more information, or to submit comments, visit the CCMPO website, http://www.ccmpo.org/ptp(link is external).For additional information, contact:CCMPO: William Knight, Executive DirectorP: (802) 660-4071 ext 15F: (802) 660-4079wknight@ccmpo.org(link sends e-mail)CCTA: Dave Davis, Chair, Board of Commissioners and Vice Chair, Task Force P: (802) 864-0211 F: (802) 864-5564Press Contact: Emily J. StebbinsP: (802) 324-4345F: (831) 604-9532emily@stridecreative.com(link sends e-mail)###last_img read more

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Opinion: South Africa’s coal-heavy draft IRP is misguided

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Business Day:The minister of energy, Jeff Radebe, published a draft of [South Africa’s] long-awaited new Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) for the power sector last week. Most observers are relieved that the draft does not include expensive nuclear power being forced into a “policy adjusted” plan with potentially disastrous financial and other consequences for SA, as was standard with the drafts produced during the Zuma years.While we should indeed be relieved that some sanity has prevailed in the process, this is not the benchmark against which the IRP should be measured. The test is how it fares in meeting the enormous challenges we face in the electricity sector today.The sector is bankrupt. Long delays and cost overruns in Eskom’s coal-fired power station build programme have resulted in big price increases, consequent reductions in demand and ultimately in Eskom’s liquidity and funding crisis.And, in a perfect storm, the sector is experiencing a fundamental technological disruption, with lower cost and smaller-scale renewable energy and related technologies that are already eating into Eskom’s market share. Many experts now agree that Eskom’s coal-based business model is not viable and will require large bailouts into the future.The draft plan, however, does not burden the reader with these unpleasant realities, which, if recognised, would have resulted in a different outcome. It assumes a continued coal power station build programme and the operation of the older coal stations for the remainder of their full 50-year lives. The result is that the plan has to assume Eskom will be able to recover these soaring costs by raising tariffs a further 39% in real terms by 2021.These numbers simply do not stack up. The plan is not viable — something will have to give.More: Energy plan’s drafters are stuck in a coal hole and have just kept digging Opinion: South Africa’s coal-heavy draft IRP is misguidedlast_img read more

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Supreme Court Weighs Uranium Mining Ban in Virginia

first_imgFor decades, uranium mining has been banned by state law in Virginia. Now, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the state has authority to ban mining, or whether that power resides instead with the federal government.The case centers on the estimated 119 million pounds of uranium ore beneath Coles Hill, a private estate in the rural landscape outside Chatham, Virginia. The cache is the largest natural deposit of uranium in the United States and one of the largest in the world.Virginia lawmakers asked a state commission in 1981 to conduct a feasibility study on uranium mining and milling. A year later, they enacted a law that permitted uranium exploration but imposed a one-year moratorium on uranium mining. The moratorium was extended indefinitely in 1983. The Chernobyl disaster of 1986 effectively closed the door on uranium mining by stoking fears and driving down the price of uranium.All remained quiet at Coles Hill until the early 2000s, when Walter Coles returned to his ancestral home after a 33-year career as a military and foreign service officer. By then, the price of uranium had risen enough that he fielded a steady stream of inquiries from international investors. In late 2006, Coles and the neighboring Bowen family, whose farm land encompasses a portion of the deposit, formed Virginia Uranium Inc. and revived the idea of mining the land.Over the next seven years, the company tried unsuccessfully to convince Virginia legislators to lift the moratorium on uranium mining, eventually challenging the mining ban in state and federal court. The state-level lawsuit is on hold, awaiting the outcome of the federal lawsuit, now before the U.S. Supreme Court.The court is taking up the case as the country’s nuclear industry faces an uncertain future. Plant Vogle, a Georgia project that is the only nuclear plant under construction in the country, has been plagued by delays and cost overruns, but continues to move forward. A May 2018 study by Center for Climate and Energy Solutions found that although nuclear provides about 20 percent of U.S. electricity generation, plants are being retired because of “low wholesale electricity prices resulting from low natural gas prices, excess power generation capacity, declining renewable energy costs, and low growth in electricity demand.”Coles Hill is located in a county at an economic crossroads, too. Pittsylvania County once was a powerhouse of tobacco production, as well as home to thriving milling, textile and furniture industries. All of those legacy industries have cratered as manufacturers moved and mechanized, and tobacco use has declined to less than half of what it was in the mid-‘60s. The county has largely diversified its economy around outdoor recreation and technology-based businesses.“The community has worked really hard to rebuild a vibrant, diverse economy, and a mining operation like this is incompatible with what they’re trying to accomplish,” said Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring.Coles argued that uranium mining would be an economic boon for the county, pointing to a 2011 economic impact study that predicted 1,000 jobs, $135 million in economic impact, and $3.1 million in annual state and local taxes over the projected 35-year life of the mining operation.Charles Miller, member of the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors, grew up in the area. Miller said that since the mid-2000s, when Virginia Uranium began its push to allow mining, “overwhelmingly the people have indicated they do not want that to take place.”For him, it’s about public health, not in Pittsylvania County but in the watershed downstream.“If the moratorium is lifted, and down the road there was a generation or two or three of children that had birth defects that could be positively linked back to uranium mining, I have children, grandchildren, a great grandchild that would have to bear that burden. I’m not willing to be a party to that.”Opposition to uranium mining has been echoed by regional environmental advocacy groups including the Dan River Basin Association, the Roanoke River Basin Association, and the Piedmont Environmental Council.Beyond local concerns, there are huge potential impacts for people living downstream. The city of Virginia Beach, home to nearly a half-million people, draws its drinking water from Lake Gaston, a reservoir on the Roanoke River.A decision is expected by the summer of 2019.Mason Adams writes from Floyd County, Va. A longer version of this story was originally published by Energy News Network.last_img read more

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Roslyn Heights Home Invasion Probed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police are investigating a Roslyn Heights home invasion in which a woman was accosted early Saturday morning, authorities said.Four men entered a Sherwood Lane home through a side door and demanded money from a 63-year-old woman, who one of the suspects threatened while another held her on the ground and ripped a gold chain from her neck at 12:40 a.m., police said.One of the other suspects stole cash from the victim’s pocketbook before they fled the scene, police said.The victim’s 66-year-old husband, 66, was sleeping in a different part of the home at the time. There were no reported injuries.Third Squad detectives ask anyone with information about this crime to contact Nassau County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous.last_img read more

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Apple Picking on Long Island 2015: Where to Pick Your Apples

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York With fall in the air, the apples are getting ripe for picking at farms out east, which are basking in the autumn glow as families pour in for refreshing apple cider, mouth-watering apple pies and an assortment of delectable apple-inspired goodies. Between hayrides, farm stands, corn mazes, wagon rides, and games for the kids, theses family friendly farms offer loved ones the chance to make the most of any trip on LI’s iconic East End. The fresh produce that the farmers markets provide as well as their delicious candy apples will have you and your loved ones eating all day. Going apple picking is a fun and scenic way to spend the day, and it will be a memory that you will treasure long after the fruits of your labors are devoured. The list below contains multiple locations that you will want to check out this fall.Do not miss your chance to pick the big apple out on Long Island. And remember: It’s always best to call ahead to ensure that these popular orchards haven’t already been picked clean!DAVIS PEACH FARMFor more than 100 years Davis Peach Farm has been growing and selling the plumpest, juiciest peaches around. This unbeatable go-to spot for fresh produce also yields the crispest, juiciest apples ripe for pickin’! Pick your own apples until the end of September, or pick peaches and nectarines through the second week of October. They won’t reveal the secret blend of juices in their famous sangria mix, but luckily you can purchase it at their farmers market and experience this all-healing nectar at home! Hulse Landing Road, Wading River. 631-929-1115. Davispeachfarm.com 9 a.m.-5 p.m (Call first to confirm trees available for picking.)FORT SALONGA FARMThe raspberries at this farm are sweet, plump, and pick-your-own on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Unfortunately, the apple orchard is only open to class trips this year due to deer-related crop damage. 30 Meadow Glen Rd., Northport. 631-269-9666. Fortsalongafarm.comHARBES FAMILY FARM AND ORCHARDOffering a corn maze, a spooky maze, pumpkin hay rides, and more than 24 different types of apples, Harbes Family Farm and Orchard has the best to offer for all ages, with a family friendly environment guaranteed to amaze and entertain! Be sure to visit their vineyard and tasting room after your fun-filled day on the farm. 5698 Sound Ave., Riverhead. 631-298-0800 or 631-298-0700. Harbesfamilyfarm.com/apple-picking Saturday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $8 per person.LEWIN FARMS Sprawling across more than 1,100 acres, Lewin Farms boasts a corn maze, a farm stand, and several pick-your-own fruits and vegetables including tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, apples and pumpkins. The amount of crops this farm has to offer is unmatched. Call for prices and to confirm apple availability. Sound Avenue, Baiting Hollow. 631-929-4327. Lewinfarm.com 9 a.m-4:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays only.MILK PAIL FARM AND ORCHARDThis orchard is a must for picking your own apples, pumpkins, gourds and squash. The kids will love picking their own apples from the dwarf apple trees! Pick up some nut butters, plants, berries and pies at their fresh market before you head home! 1346 Montauk Hwy., Water Mill. 631-537-2565. Milk-pail.com 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday. $43 per 20-pound bag.SEVEN PONDS ORCHARDPick from four apple varieties this year: Gingergold, Gala, Honeycrisp and Macintosh. Not into apples? Then pick your own raspberries, string beans and tomatoes before hitting up the incredible farmers market, hopping on the hayride, getting lost in the corn maze, or just joshing around at the playground. Wow! Seven Ponds Road, Water Mill. 631-726-8015. Facebook.com/pages/seven-ponds-orchard 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Sunday.THE APPLE ORCHARD @ HANK’S PUMPKINTOWNPumpkintown has it all—apple picking, pumpkin picking, face painting, a playground, and even gem mining! Will you find gemstones, fossils, arrowheads or seashells? Of course you will! This orchard offers the best kid-friendly environment around and will be a good time for everyone. There are a dozen apple varieties to pick— Gala, McIntosh, Honeycrisp, Fuji, Cortland, Macoun, Empire, Snow Sweet, Jonagold, Suncrisp and Mutsu—with varying ripening times. 240 Montauk Hwy, Water Mill. 631-726-4667. Hankspumpkintown.com 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday-Sunday. $20 per 10-pound bag, limited to four people per bag.WICKHAM’S FRUIT FARMMost of this farm dates back to 1661, and its grounds offers apple picking, peaches, tomatoes, and raspberries. Set against beautiful Peconic Bay, you can tour this historic farm, cider press, and working beehive on a wagon ride! In addition to apple picking, they also offer homemade pies, jams, preserves and teabreads. Don’t leave without enjoying their gourmet selection of specialty cheeses! Who would have thought apples and cheese pair so scrumptiously well together? Dee-lishhh! 28700 Main Rd., Cutchogue. 631-734-6441. Wickhamsfruitfarm.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday-Saturday. Closed Sunday.WINDY ACRES FARMPick your own apples at this family-owned farm run by fourth-generation farmers. Their farm stand offers roasted corn and cider doughnuts, as well as eggplant, tomatoes, okra, peppers and string beans—all bound to soothe the belly and soul. Pick up some fresh produce, and enjoy it in the picnic area while the little ones have a ball at the playground! 3810 Middle Country Rd., Calverton. 631-727-4554. Facebook.com/pages/windy-acres-farm 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Sunday.WOODSIDE ORCHARDS  For more than three decades this family-run orchard has been offering the very best, most delectable apple pies, fresh cider, and more than 30 varieties of apples to pick from. They have truly taken apple cider to the next level! Try out their cider slushies and five different kinds of hard cider! They even brew their own apple wine! The special semi-dwarfed trees grown at both of their locations make it easy for people of all sizes and almost all ages to pick the apples since the trees only reach a height of about 10 feet! So, hungry pickers won’t have to go too far out on a limb to snatch something delicious. 631-722-5770. Woodsideorchards.com Manor Lane, Jamesport: Saturday-Sunday 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Route 25, Aquebogue: Monday-Sunday 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.—With Desiree D’ioriolast_img read more

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Nice idea, Mr Prescott. Who pays?

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Israel looks to export its coronavirus coping skills

first_imgStart-up nation Israel, on its way out of coronavirus lockdown, is seeking to export lessons that have allowed it to emerge as one of the least-hit victims of the pandemic.Use of distance diagnostics, blood analysis, mobile phone tracking and tracing and mandatory wearing of face masks are among measures credited with giving the Jewish state an official COVID-19 death toll of around 280, equivalent to 31 per million inhabitants.That compares with around 310 deaths per million in the US, about 560 in Britain and 427 in France. Topics : In Israel, patients equipped with “oximeters” are contacted twice daily by medical teams who ask them to report their data.A decrease in blood oxygen levels shows a downturn in the condition of the patient who is brought swiftly to hospital.The quasi-governmental Jewish Agency, formed to encourage Jewish immigration to Israel, has formed a partnership with the country’s Weizmann Institute of Science and private health services provider Clalit Health Services, to try to export the Israeli model to Jewish communities abroad.”The basic idea is to try to explain to the Jewish community — which has been proportionally more affected than the average population in France, in the United States, mainly in New York — the experience of doctors and scientists in Israel,” Amos Hermon, a Jewish Agency executive, told AFP.center_img “We think that Israel has taken the essential measures [to stem the crisis].””In comparison with other countries, Israel has done very well… We therefore would like to share this knowledge, with other communities which have been very affected,” he added.Israeli officials, mindful of the Jewish festival of Shavuot which began on Thursday evening, have urged French Jews to delay opening their synagogues for the time being and urged setting up medical committees to monitor the health of their community, according to viewers of an online discussion between a Paris Jewish leader and Israeli officials.The Israelis recommended checking worshippers before they arrive at their synagogue, by using oximeters, enabling a quick and simple measuring of blood oxygen as a measure of health.”The basic idea is to have a doctor in daily contact with patients in order to assess the signs of deterioration in their state of health …. The oximeter is the tool,” notes Boaz Katz, from the Weizmann Institute.According to a study by Tel Aviv University, about 70 percent of people diagnosed with the virus in Israel have been infected with a strain from the United States, and 30 percent from Europe, mainly from France and Belgium.last_img read more

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