News

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article NewsOn 1 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today This month’s newsTractor deaths study Lap straps on tractors would have prevented at least some of the 27 deaths inthe past 10 years among tractor drivers who were thrown from their cabs whentheir tractors overturned, according to new research carried out for the HSE bythe Transport Research Laboratory. The research used computer modelling tocompare injuries suffered by drivers when using or not using a lap strap. Theeffectiveness of lap straps as seat restraints on tractors in the event ofoverturning, price £20, is available from HSE Books tel: 01787 881165, fax:01787 313995. Safer docks call The docks industry needs to reduce accidents and address modern workingmethods, says shipping minister Keith Hill. Three people died and 709 wereinjured as a result of dock work in 1999-2000. The Health and Safety Commissionis reviewing all the areas involved in health and safety in the docks industry.Advice on gloves A leaflet on choosing the right gloves for the right job has been publishedby the HSE. Selecting protective gloves for work with chemicals is availablefrom HSE Books tel: 01787 881165, fax: 01787 313995. Single copies are free,packs of 10 are £5. last_img read more

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GPs in skills scheme for work health

first_img Comments are closed. A new package from the Royal College of General Practitioners aims to giveGPs, practice nurses and practice managers more support to treat and advisepatients about occupational health. The distance learning programme is designedto give those in general practice a better understanding of the OH problems oftheir patients and their OH responsibilities to their own staff. Public health minister Yvette Cooper said, “We recognise the key roleGPs and their teams should play in improving the health of people at work. Thisprogramme will give them the support to advise their patients about health atwork. “The programme is also backed by a £6m investment announced in the NHSPlan which will come on stream next year to provide occupational healthservices for GPs and their own staff.” GPs in skills scheme for work healthOn 1 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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What qualification do I need for management training?

first_img Previous Article Next Article What qualification do I need for management training?On 25 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Iwant to be involved in delivering management training. I hold a CIPDCertificate in Training Practice and have experience in delivering training forthe department in which I work, but the extent of my soft skills deliveryexperience is a Train the Trainer course. Would a management NVQ help or do Ineed to do an HR Degree?PeterWilford, consultant, Chiumento, writes:Youneed to ask yourself what the reason is for your lack of experience to date. Doyou lack delivery experience? If so, perhaps you can put a case within your ownorganisation to get the opportunity to deliver some in-house material. Do youfeel unable to write material to deliver a training course because you lackbusiness knowledge? If so, further study could be a good option.Inorder to develop your management training skills, theoretical knowledge gainedthrough courses undoubtedly plays a part. Management training is also an areawhere experience counts heavily upon establishing personal credibility. Beingable to facilitate managers finding solutions to their own problems can beassisted by the insights gained from broader experience of the kind of work andlife problems they face. In addition, platform experience and developmentalexperience can be gained from sessions of two-up training, especially withsomeone whose background differs substantially from your own. Seeing how theyhandle a topic or problem thrown at the two of you will enable you to develop arange of techniques, in some cases almost subconsciously and to appreciate thatthere is not always just one answer.Finallyyou may not be selling yourself as well as possible and perhaps need to hone upon selling the experiences you already have in this area. Remember thatemployers are looking for more rounded individuals in the training field, thosewho can devise and create solutions to problems rather than just deliver.Margaret Malpas, joint managing director, MalpasFlexible Learning, writes:Iwould recommend the CIPD graduate programme including the trainer electives. Thiswould give you the basic grounding you need in management topics via the Core Managementelement. Then there are four electives which are specifically for trainers –Employee Development, Managing Learning Processes, Managing Training and eitherOrganisational Consultancy or Management Development. This would be a perfectsolution for your aims.LouiseWhite, consultant EJ Human Resources, writes:Qualificationsalways go someway to assist in career development but they are no substitutefor practical experience. On the other hand, they can demonstrate commitment toyour employer and show that you are serious about taking on more responsibilityin this area. Subsequently, your employer may be keen to provide you with theopportunity to supplement your course with hands on experience. Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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People

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Globetrotting Andy Craggs has landed the top HR job at Egg, although itshouldn’t be too daunting for him as he has previously worked for some of theworld’s biggest corporations. Relocating from the US to Europe two years ago, Craggs says he is now reallylooking forward to spending time living and working in the UK. “I’m a keeninternationalist, having grown up in many places and speaking a few languages,so I hope to bring that to the table as Egg looks at new markets.” His role at Egg is primarily people focused and he brings a wealth ofexperience from his previous jobs at Sony, Disney and the Wall Street Journal. “My duties will be to inject new impetus and fresh ideas into theoverall people function of Egg. I report to CEO Paul Gratton and as such willbe responsible for ensuring that the potential of Egg’s people is fullydeveloped,” he explains. Craggs also wants to align the HR function with the key business initiativesand ensure all the right systems are in place to improve people management. “Egg is a visionary brand and I want to develop and reflect thatposition internally with one of its most important resources – its people. Ifwe are successful, the people function will provide solutions and strategiesthat directly impact on business success,” he says. Craggs, who enjoys sports, travel and culture, also has a clear notion ofwhat he enjoys about HR. “Creating solutions so that people are free to betheir best, know how they fit into the business plan, and how they can have animpact. Making a company a fun and unique place to work is also great,” heconcludes. CV2001 Chief people officer, Egg1999 Vice-president HR, Sony Pictures Europe1997 Vice-president international HR Sony Pictures, TV division1994 Director international HR, The Walt Disney Company1987 International consultant, Watson Wyatt 1985 International HR specialist, Wall Street Journal  On the moveSarah Hogg has joined recruitmentconsultancy The Buzz as an HR consultant. She joins from Phee Farrer Joneswhere she was responsible for recruiting journalists and sub-editors. Hogg willwork across a range of industries from retail to petrochemicals, on all levelsof HR roles. In the past she has worked for the BBC and is CIPD qualified.The Commission for Racial Equalityhas appointed Daniel Silverstone as chief executive. Silverstone was secondedto the CRE from London Boroughs Grants in April with a remit to help theorganisation deliver its Race Relations Amendment Act obligations. He willintroduce systems that will help the organisation advise the public sector andfulfil public expectations.The Suffolk Health Authority hasappointed Margaret Parry as an HR specialist. Parry will advise the authority,based in Ipswich, on operational human resources policy and the day-to-dayworking of the department. Prior to joining the health authority, she worked asan HR adviser to AXA Insurance, also based in Ipswich. Comments are closed. PeopleOn 4 Dec 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Mouse problems highlighted by HSE

first_imgMouse problems highlighted by HSEOn 1 Jan 2003 in Musculoskeletal disorders, Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Research to help reduce the incidence and number of working days lost tomusculoskeletal disorders among computer users has been published by the Healthand Safety Executive. Scientists at the universities of Surrey and Loughborough examined the useof different types of non-keyboard input devices (NKID), such as mouse,trackball and touchscreen, and the problems associated with using them. They found that, although many alternatives are available, the mouse is byfar the most commonly used device. However, most of those polled had received no training or informationspecific to the safe use of NKIDs and a large number of users worked forprolonged periods without a break, despite most having some discretion overthis. Pain or discomfort related to use of NKIDs was reported by about one infive, with problems ranging from unsuitable design (shape and size), jitterymovements and complex controls, to insufficient desk space and lack of cleaningor maintenance. Supporting the arm while using a mouse was the best way of avoiding problemsand curved (L-shaped) desks were rated as the most comfortable. Malcolm Darvill, head of ergonomics policy at the HSE, said the HSE woulduse the research to produce revised guidance next February. “This will help employers comply with the law by giving specificpractical advice on how to work comfortably with a mouse or other NKID,”he said. last_img read more

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Employers urged to change policy on mobile phones or face fines

first_imgEmployers urged to change policy on mobile phones or face finesOn 1 Dec 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Employers have been warned that unless they issue clear policies outlawingmobile phone use while driving on company business they could face fines of asmuch as £2,500. Laws banning individual drivers using hand-held devices such as mobilephones and hand-held computers came into force this month, but employers couldalso be liable if an offence is committed by staff. Amendments to the Road Vehicles (construction and use) Regulations 1986state that anyone who “causes or permits any other person to use ahand-held mobile phone while driving” will also be liable for a fine. Employment lawyers are warning that directors or managers could beresponsible if they instruct or expect staff to use a phone in a way thatbreeches the new rules. The Department of Transport issued guidance that explained employers wouldnot be committing an offence by distributing mobile phones for work use, butcould be held accountable if they told staff to do so. The guidelines also recommended that companies should ban staff from usingany mobile device while driving on company business. Stephen Elliott, an associate at law firm Ward Hadaway, said firms shouldissue a formal policy to staff that made clear it was not acceptable to breakthe new rules while at work. “Employers need to be very wary of these rules and a comprehensivepolicy on mobile phone use is recommended. It should be made perfectly clearthat using a phone to make or receive business calls while driving amounts togross misconduct,” he said. Drivers caught breaking the new rules will receive a £30 fine (shortlyrising to £60 and three penalty points) while Icis, a business mobile provider,predicts that employers could be fined £2,500 per driver. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Nurses express doubts over use of extra cash

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Nurses express doubts over use of extra cashOn 18 May 2004 in Personnel Today The billions of pounds being pumped into the NHS to improve patient care andrecruit more nurses is having little effect on frontline services, according toa poll of 1,000 nurses. The survey by The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) showed that less than a thirdof nurses believe the extra £5.9bn in government funding given to the NHS inthe past year has made any difference to their working lives. Only 30 per cent believe the number of permanent nursing staff hasincreased, while 47 per cent said spending on agency staff has risen, and 52per cent thought the money was being used to employ more managers. The Government has stressed the importance of involving frontline clinicalstaff in decisions about where to target spending. But the survey showed thatthe overwhelming majority of nurses (80 per cent) had little or no involvementin deciding where new investment was spent. General secretary of the RCN, Dr Beverly Malone, said that nurses shouldplay an invaluable role in ensuring the money was used to make a genuinedifference to patients. “Enabling our leadership to be fully utilised will mean thatimprovements will be seen right across the health service,” Malone said. Andrew McNeilis, commercial director at HR consultancy Hudson, defendedagency nursing. He said that flexible labour was essential to fill gaps whenstaff were off sick or needed to go on training courses. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Call for vocational ‘police’ qualifications

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Call for vocational ‘police’ qualificationsOn 7 Sep 2004 in Police, Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Potentialpolice recruits should have to complete a vocational degree or an equivalentbefore applying to the service, according to the sector skills body for thecriminal justice system.DickWinterton, chief executiveof Skills for Justice, said the Police Service was the only profession that didnot use the education system to prepare people before they join.Hecompared the situation to other professions, such as engineering andhealthcare, where practitioners do not “simply turn up” at the localworks or hospital and expect training.Winterton also called for aprofessional register to track the skills and competencies of police officers.Hewarned that, unlike most professions, the Police Service had no formalmechanism for ensuring that people were keeping theirskills up to date. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Single-family housing starts now at 2007 bubble level

first_img(iStock)The number of housing units under construction grew for the third month in a row, as housing continues to drive the construction industry.The last time single-family homes were built at this pace was 13 years ago, just before the housing bubble burst.Housing starts last month increased 1.2 percent, seasonally adjusted, with 19,000 more units getting under way than in October, according to the Census Bureau’s monthly report on residential construction. In October housing starts grew by nearly 5 percent month-over-month, while in September they grew by 2 percent compared to August.Housing starts in November were up 12.8 percent from the same period last year, when just 1.37 million units were under construction.Read moreHomebuilder confidence drops for first time since AprilHousing drives rise in construction spending OctoberHousing starts rose almost 5% last month Email Address* Share via Shortlink TagsConstructionHousing MarketResidential Real Estate Full Name*center_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Message* Residential construction accounted for 44 percent of total construction spending in October, the most recent period for which data is available. But homebuilders, which have been reporting unprecedented levels of optimism for the housing market, are beginning to rein in expectations. This month an index tracking homebuilder sentiment dropped for the first time since April.But Joel Kan, head of industry forecasting at the Mortgage Bankers Association, noted that permits for single-family home construction rose to 2007 levels, which he said could indicate that the increase in homebuilding may continue into early 2021.He also noted that housing starts of single-family homes had reached the highest level since 2007 for the second month in a row. The record was initially broken in October.Building permits were up 6.2 percent to 1.63 million units, seasonally adjusted, compared to October. Permitting was up 8.5 percent year-over-year.Despite increases in housing starts and permits, supply remains tight. Housing completions last month dropped 12 percent to 1.16 million units, seasonally adjusted, from 1.3 million units finished in October.Contact Erin Hudsonlast_img read more

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Steven Goodstein, Battery Park City developer, dead at 81

first_img Message* Email Address* Steven GoodsteinSteven Goodstein, who built part of Battery Park City in the 1980s and was part of a dynastic New York real estate family, died Saturday. He was 81.The developer died at his home in Delray Beach, Florida, a representative for his family firm, the Goodstein Organization, told The Real Deal. The cause of death was pneumonia.Goodstein’s father Jack Goodstein, a Polish immigrant who settled in the Bronx, founded a company in the 1950s that constructed buildings in Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx.Steven, born in Queens in 1940, joined the family company in 1957. The firm developed properties including the commercial and residential condominium Fifth Avenue Tower near Bryant Park at 445 Fifth Avenue, and was a one-time owner of the Peninsula Hotel along with Sol Goodman, William Zeckendorf Jr. and others.In 1981 the Battery Park City Authority selected a joint venture of Goodstein and Milstein Properties to develop several buildings at the Lower Manhattan megaproject.Contact Rich Bockmann Tags Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Full Name* Battery Park Cityobituarylast_img read more

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