Zero tolerance! Abusers out!

first_imgThe following editorial was written by gender non-binary and women comrades of Workers World Party.The progressive movement has come a long way from its shameful history of gender abuse. There is still a gargantuan mountain to climb toward socialism, gender equity and justice. We link arms and will continue to climb together.  We must resoundingly affirm that we will protect each other from racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism and abuse. If we are to succeed, abusers and their enablers must not be welcome in our spaces or in our movement. In consulting the 2010 essay, “Why Misogynists Make Great Informants” by Black gender activist and academic Courtney Desiree Morris, we find that the danger is twofold. Misogynists and abusers chase people of oppressed gender out of the movement. In fear for our safety and in recognition that trans and cis women, trans men, lesbians, queer folks and gender- nonconforming individuals’ lives and contributions are not valued the same as cis (het) men’s, we are wary of entering spaces where we are not supported. Losing comrades in the movement is always a detriment, and losing the unique perspective that gender-oppressed comrades contribute to the struggle is a road to failure. By accepting abusers into movement spaces we allow a fertile ground for state infiltration that takes advantage of the havoc abusers create. People of oppressed gender have the right to defend themselves from abuse, homophobia and misogyny. We have the right to hold organizations accountable that do not support our self-determination. Spaces and organizations that do not take this into account create an untenable situation for the 21st century. Women and others of oppressed gender are expected to silence ourselves and put up with abuse in an effort to build unity. Unity for who? Not unity with women and others of oppressed gender who have every right to insist on their inclusion in the movement. After all, we are also struggling for liberation. We are the backbone of the struggle for liberation. Abusers and their enablers will see this insistence for safety as proof that we are not putting the movement first. We are told to “close our eyes and think of socialism.” But what socialism can we visualize when we cannot be sure it will prioritize our safety and contributions?  We can only see a form of socialism that prioritizes our safety and contributions.Under a Trump administration that is attacking the bodies of women, trans and GNC people, people of oppressed gender have a rage that is growing. It is a righteous rage. Our fears that our comrades and allies in the movement do not have our back is made manifest every time an abuser is allowed to remain in our movement. While transformative justice is an important model to develop, it cannot be practiced in an environment where women and people of oppressed gender feel under physical threat. It cannot be developed in an environment where we feel like our comrades and allies do not have our backs. It cannot be developed in an environment where abusers do not take responsibility for their actions. Until there is unity around removing abusers from our movement, there can be no discussion of how to bring them back as healed individuals. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Listen: Ball Don’t Lie: Parting Shots

first_img2021 NFL Mock Draft (Part 1) Special Listen: Ball Don’t Lie: Captain Marvel Andrew Van Heusden is a senior journalism and film-television-digital media major from Brighton, Michigan. He is looking forward to being the digital producer this semester for TCU Student Media. He claims to live in Moudy South throughout the weekdays; but if you can’t find him there, then be sure to try the local movie theaters or the Amon G. Carter Stadium. In the final and bittersweet episode of Ball Don’t Lie, Cole discusses the NBA’s greatest players and the vulnerability of the Golden State Warriors. print 2020/21 NFL Exit Interviews – NFC West Facebook Andrew Van Heusden Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 14 Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 15 – Parts 1 & 2 Twitter Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Fort Worth’s first community fridge program helps serve vulnerable neighborhoods Twitter Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ + posts Facebook ReddIt Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 13 Linkedin Previous articleSaby Sahoo’s tumultuous journey to TCUNext articleThe Skiff: May 2, 2019 Andrew Van Heusden RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ ReddIt Linkedinlast_img read more

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Banks school to host ‘a family reunion’

first_img Wilda Steele and Dick Barr attended Banks grammar school in the 1930s. They will be among the Banks School alumni who will share the stories of the early days at the school during the Banks School (Family) Reunion from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Banks School on Nov. 3. All Banks School alumni and students and their families are encouraged to attend.Excitement is running rampant in the usually sleepy town of Banks.It’s been that way since the plans for a Banks School Reunion were made public.“We like to say that everybody’s who’s anybody will be at the Banks School Reunion on Saturday, Nov. 3,” said Charity Maulden, president of the sponsoring Banks School PTO. “We don’t say that in a bragging way. It’s just that anyone who ever attended Banks School is a part of a great extended family. So the Banks School Reunion is more than a school reunion. It’s a family reunion.” Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Skip By Jaine Treadwell Latest Stories A highlight of the “family reunion” will be the gathering tents for the different decades of Banks School classes.The classes, going back to the 1920s, will get together in their tents to visit with each other and share stories and tales of their days at Banks School. The gatherings will be times of telling and listening.Maulden said those who want to know more about the history and lore of Banks School will be welcome to sit in on any of the gatherings and enjoy the stories being told. Sponsored Content Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Published 11:00 pm Friday, October 26, 2012 By The Penny Hoarder You Might Like Bringing dough to life Susan Berry carefully sculpts her dough figures and gives them whimsical faces and clothes. Dough art is an ancient craft…. read more Book Nook to reopen Print Article Grade five held classes on the stage and grade six on the floor.“There was a folding door that went across the room and it was pulled,” Steele said. “Grades seven, eight and nine met all together behind the folding door. There was no kindergarten. We didn’t know about anything like that.”Barr said the conditions at Banks School were rather primitive by today’s standards.“We had an old coal-burning stove to keep us halfway warm in the winter and widows that raised so we could stay halfway cool in the summer,” he said. “We didn’t have water fountains. There was a metal water cooler with a spicket that sat on the back steps. When you wanted a drink of water, you made a cup out of notebook paper and that’s what you drank out of.”Barr said a “feature” of country schools back then was the outdoor toilets.“We had one set of toilets for the boys and one for the girls,” he said, laughing. “The toilets were open and they weren’t one seaters. The had several holes.”Recess was a fun time at school and the children would jump rope and play hopscotch and games like two-eyed cat and “Big guinea, little guinea, all squat.”Times were not easy back in the 1930s and a lot of children came to school with nothing for their lunch except at cold biscuit and syrup in a jar.“They would poke a hole in the biscuit and pour it full of syrup,” Barr said. “That would be all they had to eat at school that day and probably didn’t have much more at home.”Steele said that some children would be so hungry that they would steal lunches from the other children who were more fortunate.Barr said that as he got older, he would be lucky enough to have a nickel a week to spend.“But you could buy a Baby Ruth for a penny,” he said.When it was time to go to junior high school, the Banks students had to go to Troy to take a test to see if they were ready for such a big jump in their early education.“I don’t know if the children in Troy had to take the test but all of the children in the county schools did,” Steele said.When Steele reached the seventh grade, the size of the eighth and ninth grade classes had dwindled.“So many of the students had to stay out of school to work on the farm,” she said. “I think there were only about three students left in the eighth grade.”Something really remarkable happened when Steele was in eighth grade. A brand new schoolhouse, a brick schoolhouse, was being built.“Because the new school was going up, we had to have classes in a cotton warehouse,” Steele said. “We had children scattered all over the community.”For the young boys, school in a warehouse was a great adventure.“The warehouse had bales of cotton stacked all around,” Barr said. “Chickens would get in the bales and lay eggs.”Chasing chickens was an impromptu game but Barr didn’t say what the 13-year-old boys did with the eggs.One student incident happened on April Fool’s Day.“We told the principal if he didn’t take us to the woods we were all going to run away,” Steele said. “He took us to the woods and we got to have a picnic.”Banks School had a boys’ basketball team but the girls could only stand on the sidelines and watch.“We played basketball outside on a dirt court and we had a pretty good team,” Barr said. “We also played tennis, but not as a team. We just had a racquet and a ball and a net to hit it over.”But, school in the new brick building was a lot different from the school days in the old wooden building.“Mrs. Lola Lawson was the principal and she ran the school like a military school,” Barr said. “We had to change classes and that was all new to us. When the school bell rang to dismiss class, we had to stand up and march out of the room row by row. Like we were soldiers.”But the students took great pride in their new school building.“We had a big auditorium and we had assemble programs every Friday,” Steele said.But trouble brewed in the new auditorium.“There were these little rubber pads on the bottom of the seats that folded down,” Barr said. “Some of the boys pulled them off and cut them in little strips and threw them at each other.”That did not sit well with Principal Lawson.“She got us all in the auditorium and made us sit there without saying a word until the ones who cut the pads and threw them owned up to it,” Barr said. “She sat on the stage and watched us.”It took several days for the 27 boys to own up and, when they did, the principal sent them out to the sugarberry bush for switches.Steele and Barr said the there was no sparring the rod in the early days of Banks School.“We were serious about learning,” Steele said. “We were good students and appreciated the opportunity to learn.”And, it’s still that way at Banks School. In the second decade of the 21st century just as in the second decade of the 20th century, the students are good students and appreciate the opportunity to learn. And all of the Banks School family will come together on Nov. 3 to renew friendships, make new ones and tell stories and listen to stories being told, much like all “families” do when they have a rare chance to all be together. Banks school to host ‘a family reunion’ The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Wilda Steele laughingly said she and her brother, Dick Barr, Jr., just might be the most “storied” of all the Banks School alumni.Steele taught at Banks School from 1960-1980 and will share stories from the “Golden Rule” school days but, more importantly, she also enrolled in first grade at Banks School in 1929. Her brother followed a year later. Both completed their “grammar school” and junior high school educations at Banks School.“My first grade teacher was Alma Eppison and what I remember most about first grade was sitting on the reading bench and watching the pipe from the coal burning stove fall on Knox Green’s head,” Steele said, laughing. “Knox said, ‘Oh! Have I got ‘put’ on my head?’”Steele said she and her brother attended Banks School when it was a two-story wooden building with the auditorium upstairs. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Email the author Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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People

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Globetrotting Andy Craggs has landed the top HR job at Egg, although itshouldn’t be too daunting for him as he has previously worked for some of theworld’s biggest corporations. Relocating from the US to Europe two years ago, Craggs says he is now reallylooking forward to spending time living and working in the UK. “I’m a keeninternationalist, having grown up in many places and speaking a few languages,so I hope to bring that to the table as Egg looks at new markets.” His role at Egg is primarily people focused and he brings a wealth ofexperience from his previous jobs at Sony, Disney and the Wall Street Journal. “My duties will be to inject new impetus and fresh ideas into theoverall people function of Egg. I report to CEO Paul Gratton and as such willbe responsible for ensuring that the potential of Egg’s people is fullydeveloped,” he explains. Craggs also wants to align the HR function with the key business initiativesand ensure all the right systems are in place to improve people management. “Egg is a visionary brand and I want to develop and reflect thatposition internally with one of its most important resources – its people. Ifwe are successful, the people function will provide solutions and strategiesthat directly impact on business success,” he says. Craggs, who enjoys sports, travel and culture, also has a clear notion ofwhat he enjoys about HR. “Creating solutions so that people are free to betheir best, know how they fit into the business plan, and how they can have animpact. Making a company a fun and unique place to work is also great,” heconcludes. CV2001 Chief people officer, Egg1999 Vice-president HR, Sony Pictures Europe1997 Vice-president international HR Sony Pictures, TV division1994 Director international HR, The Walt Disney Company1987 International consultant, Watson Wyatt 1985 International HR specialist, Wall Street Journal  On the moveSarah Hogg has joined recruitmentconsultancy The Buzz as an HR consultant. She joins from Phee Farrer Joneswhere she was responsible for recruiting journalists and sub-editors. Hogg willwork across a range of industries from retail to petrochemicals, on all levelsof HR roles. In the past she has worked for the BBC and is CIPD qualified.The Commission for Racial Equalityhas appointed Daniel Silverstone as chief executive. Silverstone was secondedto the CRE from London Boroughs Grants in April with a remit to help theorganisation deliver its Race Relations Amendment Act obligations. He willintroduce systems that will help the organisation advise the public sector andfulfil public expectations.The Suffolk Health Authority hasappointed Margaret Parry as an HR specialist. Parry will advise the authority,based in Ipswich, on operational human resources policy and the day-to-dayworking of the department. Prior to joining the health authority, she worked asan HR adviser to AXA Insurance, also based in Ipswich. Comments are closed. PeopleOn 4 Dec 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Late Cenozoic glacier-volcano interaction on James Ross Island and adjacent areas, Antarctic Peninsula region

first_imgThe northern Antarctic Peninsula region has undergone similar to 10 m.y. of eruptive activity by basaltic volcanoes, mainly in subglacial settings. Spectacular exposures of lava-fed deltas, capped by basalt flows and commonly underlain by glacigenic sediments on top of a Cretaceous sedimentary “basement,” characterize James Ross, Vega, and other islands and promontories in the region. Neogene strata are collectively known as the James Ross Island Volcanic Group and record a cryptic history of glaciation, with the timing of events determinable by argon-isotope dating. Focusing especially on the glacigenic sediments themselves, and their relationships with overlying or bounding volcanic rocks, we define facies associations related to (1) eruptions beneath thick ice (>200 m) that produced lava-fed deltas resting on, and intermingling with, diamictite; and (2) eruptions under marine conditions that typically culminated in the development of several tuff-cone successions, some on top of presumably relict glacially striated surfaces. A combination of provenance studies on clasts in the glacigenic sediments, some of which are derived from the Antarctic Peninsula, and geochronology, leads to the conclusion that an Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended over James Ross and Vega Islands at about the time that the main volcanic edifices began to grow, i.e., prior to ca. 6.2 Ma at least. Much of the subsequent development of the succession is attributed to the interaction between the growing volcanoes and local ice caps. Full resolution of glacial-interglacial events in this region promises to inform the debate about the stability of the most climatically sensitive part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet during the Neogene Period.last_img read more

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Can you name the 30 London landmarks in this photo?

first_imgIt’s not a spot-the-ball competition, but more a spot the London landmarks one. But either way if there’s an agent out there who can name all 30 buildings within the collage then there’s a business consultancy package worth £7,300 up for grabs.Originally conceived as a simple pictorial challenge, it’s instead turned into a viral hit among property folk many of whom are “utterly addicted and committed to cracking it” says its creator, property marketing agency Vivacity London.It commissioned the artwork and has launched it at the capital’s property and construction sectors. Anyone who can correctly identify all the buildings within the extraordinary picture must email their list to [email protected] by July 19th, with winners to be announced two days later.London landmarks“It’s clever, beautiful, and enraging all at once – I’m devoted to solving it, if I have to walk the width and breadth of London,” says chartered surveyor Julian Davies, Managing Director of Earl Kendrick Associates.And David Graves, Managing Director of JCF Property Management, says the image “has me completely flummoxed”.Jennifer Evans (pictured, left), Managing Director of Vivacity London, says: “We invite professionals from the sector to play it on their commute, during their lunch break or at home with the help of family and friends, with the chance of winning the deserved prize, but we also welcome everyone else who enjoys a challenge to participant just for fun.“At first glance, you don’t imagine it to be that hard as you immediately recognise such landmarks as The London Eye and Tower Bridge.“But as you tick off the first ten or so, it becomes harder to identify where in London you’ve seen that building before and what its name is.”To view the image in all its full high-def glory and to read the full terms and conditions of the competition, visit the Vivacity London website.  Jennifer Evans Vivacity London July 4, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Can you name the 30 London landmarks in this photo? previous nextProducts & ServicesCan you name the 30 London landmarks in this photo?If you can then there’s a business consultancy package worth £7,300 up for grabs.Nigel Lewis4th July 201701,717 Viewslast_img read more

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HMCS Edmonton, USCG Seize Over 1.1 Tonnes of Cocaine

first_img HMCS Edmonton, USCG Seize Over 1.1 Tonnes of Cocaine November 4, 2013 Share this article Canadian Ship (HMCS) Edmonton, along with a Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CP-140 Aurora, assisted the United States Coast Guard (USCG) in seizing more than 1.1 tonnes of cocaine over two days in the eastern Pacific Ocean.During a search of a suspect vessel on Friday, October 25, crew members from HMCS Edmonton and her embarked U.S. Law Enforcement Detachment Team uncovered 639 kilograms of cocaine. Two days later, on Sunday, October 27, the same team tracked and boarded another suspect vessel, seizing 468 kilograms of cocaine from the vessel and from bags that were jettisoned into the water by the vessel’s crew. The two boardings occurred without incident and the narcotics seized will be destroyed. “Taking part in joint operations with our allies helps keep illicit drugs from entering Canada, and has a significant impact on the safety of our citizens,” said the Honourable. Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence. “I am proud of the significant contribution of our Canadian Armed Forces to this critical mission and their service to Canada.”In both cases, the initial detection of the suspect vessel was made by a CP-140 Aurora aircraft. As Canada’s only strategic maritime surveillance aircraft, the CP-140 Aurora is often used to patrol Canada’s coastlines, safeguarding its waters from foreign threats. Capable of flying more than 9000 kilometres —or 5000 nautical miles—without refuelling, this multi-purpose aircraft is ideal for a variety of operations. “With these seizures, HMCS Edmonton and her crew, in a joint effort with our maritime patrol aircraft, validate the excellent reputation of the Canadian Armed Forces in their work to suppress illicit trafficking,” said Lieutenant-General Stu Beare, Commander Canadian Joint Operations Command. “Our air and naval assets are once again clearly demonstrating that we are highly capable of working side-by-side with our allies, combating transnational organized crime and protecting Canadians.”HMCS Edmonton and her sister ship, HMCS Yellowknife, both based at Esquimalt, British Columbia, as well as a RCAF CP-140 Aurora aircraft, based at 19 Wing Comox, British Columbia, are currently deployed on Operation Caribbe. “I continue to be impressed with the excellence at sea demonstrated by our sailors who conduct maritime security operations in support of key partnerships in the Americas,” said Vice-Admiral Mark Norman, Commander Royal Canadian Navy. “Their success at sea is a testament to our capability, proving that our ships and their crew, small or large, are among the best in the world at conducting operations such as this.”Operation Caribbe is Canada’s contribution to Operation Martillo, a U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force South-led interagency and multinational effort among Western Hemisphere and European nations, designed to improve regional security and deter criminal activity. Canada has deployed naval and air assets on Operation Caribbe since 2006.[mappress]Press Release,November 4, 2013 Back to overview,Home naval-today HMCS Edmonton, USCG Seize Over 1.1 Tonnes of Cocaine last_img read more

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Zeelandia

first_imgSpecialist ingredients manufacturer Zeelandia (Billericay, Essex) offers a range of custards, including Roma Cold Classic, to create trifles and Easter gateaux.Roma Cold Classic is free from hydrogenated fats and has a creamy taste and texture, says the company. “We are making great strides to ensure the removal of HVOs from our product range to ensure we continue to offer the customer exactly what they want,” says Dominic Ranger, national sales and marketing manager for Zeelandia.last_img read more

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Age aware

first_imgThe Employment Equality (Age) Regulations came into force on 1 October, 2006, providing protection from age-related discrimination in the workplace for employees and applicants alike. Now, the first Employment Tribunal case to reference the legislation has been heard and has seen a 67-year-old employee reinstated to her post.Consequently, it is worth emp-loyers refreshing their memories of the basic requirements of the regulations, so as to avoid falling foul of the law themselves, particularly since recent surveys of workers and employers have produced some interesting results; one in 10 workers claimed to have experienced age discrimination, even since the introduction of the legislation and, in contrast, employers believed they were fairly or very well informed about the legislation, even though, in an ACAS survey of 750 small businesses, less than 30% of them then responded correctly to a question about whether it is still lawful to have a retirement age.RecruitmentSome simple mistakes occur at the recruitment stage, where employers are often confused about whether they can specify how much experience they’re looking for.There is nothing in the regulations that prohibits employers requiring certain experience. However, the pitfall to beware is that “time-linked” experience is likely to be indirectly discriminatory, since, generally, only applicants who have worked for the specified period will be able to apply. The effect of this is indirect discrimination, often towards younger applicants who may not have the experience specified because they had only just left school/college and are too young to have been able to work the required period.Employers need to be able to justify the reason for the period of experience they have specified and should also be aware of “direct” age discrimination – such as specifying an age range for applicants – which is likewise unlawful unless it can be objectively justified.The only exception to an employer refusing to employ someone on grounds of age is where a person is older than, or within six months of the employer’s normal retirement age – or 65 if the employer doesn’t have a normal retirement age – as the regulations provide an exemption for that category.Another area of confusion concerns job advertisements and titles. Although many employers are now aware that words such as “youthful”, “young”, “mature” or “older” should not feature in adverts, only once Tribunals have considered more age-related cases will we have guidance on other words with possible ageist connotations, such as “dynamic”, “responsible” or “ener-getic”. In the meantime, it is sensible for employers to be mindful of the language they use in adverts and focus on the job itself.There is no case law from the English Tribunals at present, but a recent Irish case, where age dis-crimination laws have been in force for some years, is relevant here. The complainant was asked questions about his age at an early stage of the interview process, including questions on the application form such as “living with parents/renting/mortgaged accommodation”, “number of children”, “age” and “date of birth”. He provided incorrect information, arguing that the questions were “irrelevant and invasive” and was not appointed to the post, despite being suitable. He was awarded E5,000, as it was held that he had been discriminated against on grounds of his age.Since discrimination law enables an individual to bring a claim if they can demonstrate that their ’age’ may have had an impact, employers should avoid any practice where someone may ’infer’ that age was an issue, such as asking for date of birth or the sort of questions raised in the Irish case.Once in a post, employees are in a better position to assess general treatment, so it’s important for employers to treat employees fairly and to be seen doing so, and to keep good records of all aspects of the employment relationship, from adverts to interview notes and from appointment letters and contracts, to termination documents.This is particularly important where any potentially contentious matters arise, such as a disciplinary or a dismissal (including redundancy), as employees may allege that the basis for the action was the employer’s age discrimination against them. In such as case, for the employer to defend the claim, documents providing an “audit trail” of the reasons for any action or decisions taken will prove vital.Employers should inform employees on how they will deal with unacceptable employee-to-employee behaviour since, even though any victimisation or harassment might be conducted by employees themselves, it’s usually the employer who is vicariously liable for their actions.RetirementThe regulations have introduced a national default retirement age of 65, which means employers can retire employees (or set retirement ages) at or above 65 and retirements or retirement ages below the default need to be able to satisfy the test of objective justification.Irrespective of the age an employer sets, they will have to follow the ’Retirement Procedure’, the first stage of which is to notify the employee, at least six months in advance of the retirement date, of their right to request to continue working. If the employee makes such a request, they should then meet to discuss it, following which the employer should inform them of their decision, which the employee can appeal. n—-=== Summary and tips for employers ===1. Avoid using age in any aspect of an employment-related decision, wherever possible2. Consider if age – or time-linked experience – really matters to the job in question3. Confirm that reasoning is not based on assumptions about age or on preconceived ideas4. Consider whether the same aim can be achieved in another way than by using age or time-linked experience5. Imagine explaining why age or experience was relevant – having to objectively justify using such criteria – to help clarify, first, whether you need to include it and also what reasons would you give to justify inclusion6. Remove age-related questions from person specifications, job adverts and application forms; they can be included on Equal Opportunities forms7. Keep good records of interviews, offers made and rejections, training undertaken or declined, and promotions8. Check whether service- related benefits that accrue with time are discriminatory9. Ensure that redundancies are not made on the basis of age or length of service10. Ensure managers are aware of the Retirement Procedure. lBrigit Foster is an employment lawyer at Darbys LLP solicitors in Oxfordlast_img read more

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Odds & Ends: James Lipton Exclusively on Former Student Bradley Cooper & More

first_img Exclusive: James Lipton on Former Student Bradley Cooper Inside the Actors Studio’s James Lipton recently spoke to Broadway.com about his former student, Bradley Cooper, and the Oscar nominee’s upcoming opening night in The Elephant Man. “I was his Dean. I auditioned him. I admitted him to our world. You bet I’ll be there!” In true #TBT spirit, watch the pair in 1999 with Sean Penn, below. Seven years later Cooper won a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for his Great White Way debut in Three Days of Rain—dreams can come true! James Corden & Wife Julia Welcome Second Child Congratulations to Tony winner, Into the Woods star and future Late Late Show host James Corden and his wife Julia. According to BBC News, the pair welcomed daughter Carey into the world on October 27. Named after her Mum’s maiden name, Carey is little sister to three-year-old Max. Broadway Alums Tapped for Paper Mill’s Elf A number of Broadway vets have boarded Paper Mill’s previously announced Christmas production of Elf. James Moye (Bullets Over Broadway) will play Buddy, with Kate Fahrner (Wicked) as Jovie, Paul C. Vogt (Chicago) as Santa, Heidi Blickenstaff (The Addams Family) as Emily Hobbs, Robert Cuccioli (Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark) as Walter Hobbs, Cleve Asbury (How to Succeed) as Mr. Greenway and Jessica Sheridan (Sister Act) as Deb. Directed by Eric Ankrim, the production will run November 26 through January 4, 2015. Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.center_img View Comments Andrew Keenan-Bolger & More Lead Sondheim’s Saturday Night The first New York revival of Stephen Sondheim’s Saturday Night will take place as part of the York Theatre Company’s fall 2014 Musicals in Mufti series. Directed by Stafford Arima, with a book by Julius J. Epstein, the cast will include former Newsies stars Andrew Keenan-Bolger and Ben Fankhauser, along with Lindsay Mendez (Wicked) and Margo Seibert (Rocky). Don’t miss the limited engagement, which will play November 8 through November 16 at the York Theatre Company at Saint Peter’s.last_img read more

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