University tests new electric car

first_imgIn an effort to explore new sustainable energy options, the University added an electric car to its fleet of vehicles this semester. The Mitsubishi iMiev, an electric car that seats four people, will be on loan from Mitsubishi Motors North America to Notre Dame this semester. Eaton Corporation is also providing three charging stations on campus, according to a Notre Dame Office of Sustainability press release. “This is just the beginning of something good for campus,” said Erin Hafner, the Sustainability Program Manager for the Office of Sustainability. “It’s opening some doors for us to bring electric cars to campus. It really wasn’t an option before.” This initial car is acting as a pilot test program, Hafner said. If successful, the University will look at adding electric cars to its fleet. “We’d like to integrate these into the fleet for travel,” she said. “We’d also like to integrate these into our maintenance fleet. There’s a wide array of uses.” The iMiev gets 100 miles to every charge, according to Mitsubishi’s website. It is also listed as a zero emissions vehicle, meaning it doesn’t emit carbon dioxide. When taking the carbon dioxide used to create electricity to charge the car into account, the iMiev still releases only 30 percent as much carbon dioxide as do its gasoline-powered mini-car counterparts. “Through our collaboration with Notre Dame, Eaton is paving the way for the development of the infrastructure leading to the adoption and expanded use of electric vehicles,” Jerry Whitaker, president of Eaton’s Electrical Sector, Americas Region, said in the press release. This is not the first time the University has partnered with Eaton Corporation; the corporation helped the University with Stinson-Remick Hall. “The project will help us to further understand the potential of electric vehicles as we strive to reduce our energy consumption and carbon footprint on campus,” Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves said in the press release. The car will be on display at public events and promotions for the Office of Sustainability, Hafner said. These promotions include football Friday afternoons at Irish Green, where the car is stationed next to a table with information about electric cars. Different University departments will also drive the car, so students will see it around campus, Hafner said. It will have a Notre Dame-themed car design similar to the three Smart cars that the University purchased this year.last_img read more

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Marching band wins music award

first_imgThough Notre Dame was awarded the 2011 Sudler Trophy, Notre Dame Marching Band Director Ken Dye said the award represents years of dedication from band members and staff. “The Sudler Trophy is for a band that historically has been at the forefront of college bands in terms of music, innovation and supporting the American way of life,” Dye said. “We’ve worked hard over a number of years with the band members who have gone through the program and with the past directors of the program. Winning the trophy is a huge achievement.” The trophy was officially presented at halftime during Saturday’s football game against Air Force. The trophy, presented by the John Philip Sousa Foundation, is the top national honor for collegiate bands. It can only be received once, and the receiving program keeps the award for two years. Head drum major senior Matt Roe said winning the trophy felt amazing. “I was actually in the band building when we received the phone call saying that we were going to be awarded the trophy,” he said. “The excitement was one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.” Roe said that the band’s greatest strength is the commitment of its members. “There are times when we’re learning three different shows at the same time,” Roe said. “Just to be able to remember it all, and to go to practice every day with the frame of mind that we’re going to have fun at practice while still keeping in mind that we have a job to do is a challenge. The commitment of everyone involved is inspiring, and it’s a lot of fun to perform at every football game.” Dye said the band focuses on developing a halftime show that can reach every demographic within the audience. “We focus on continual innovation, and we try to do things that visually connect to the audience,” Dye said. “If we do something on the field, the audience can try to guess what it is and to participate in the show as it evolves. We also try to pick music that is appealing to all of the generations of Notre Dame fans, with a particular focus to the music that is appealing and recognizable to our students.” Senior piccolo player Laura Taylor said the band’s motto encapsulates the spirit of the band and was a big part of what makes the band special. “The band’s motto is tradition, excellence and family,” Taylor said. “We have such a great love for Notre Dame, and that infuses everything we do. We are really cognizant that we are representing the University, and we all really love the tradition that we are continuing. The camaraderie in the band also motivates us to work hard at everything we do.” Dye said the band will continue innovating and working hard. “Music is one of those things at which you never can really achieve perfection; you’re always working to do it better,” he said. “We try to stay abreast of the changes in music and the current events that can be adapted to visual formations on the field. We intend to get better every year.”last_img read more

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Professor studies Arab Spring protests

first_imgNotre Dame psychology professor Laura Miller described her new line of research on the effects of extreme trauma on children and adults involved in the Arab Spring as “a marriage between [her] interests.”The Arab Spring, a wave of demonstrations and protests across the Middle East, began in 2010 and has since left its mark on the people of that area, Miller said.“The nature of what the Arab Spring has looked like and the enduring effects of initial protests have been quite different in each country,” Miller said. “In the case of Egypt, the Arab Spring began with an amazing surge of hopefulness and the removal of long-time dictator Hosni Mubarak from office, but has tragically devolved over time into military rule and pervasive instability.”Miller said her interest in the Middle East began in her undergraduate years at Notre Dame, when she studied abroad in Cairo. She wrote her senior thesis on political involvement and perceptions of mental health care among university students in Egypt. She said she then focused her graduate studies in clinical psychology on the effect of violence on children. From there, her research on the events in the Middle East took flight.Miller, who teaches the class Psychology of Peace at Notre Dame, said her research is still in its early stages.“My collaborators and I have identified some university partnerships that will be critical for facilitating our research,” Miller said. “We are starting by engaging in some academic forums that will identify the key issues, needs and research priorities. “I think that it is likely we will start with some preliminary online surveys to identify some of the cultural adaptations. We will need to make commonly used treatment methodologies and to identify ways that we can make treatment more accessible.”The effect of the Arab Spring on the mental health of those in the Middle East will be forthcoming, but Miller said the results will almost certainly indicate a need for trauma services in the region.“From the discussions I have had with colleagues so far, there is a very high need for trauma services, paired with a shortage of people available to provide these services, and much difficulty with intergroup relations,” she said.Of specifically high need for trauma resources are university students in the Middle East, she said. “Universities in the area have also reported the need for resources to help their students manage grief, as there have been a large number of student deaths that have greatly affected university communities,” Miller said.Once the need for trauma resources is validated empirically by research, Miller said the ultimate goal of the study is to help psychologically-affected Middle Easterners on the road to recovery.“After we do some survey research to identify basic needs, we are hoping to test a few intervention methodologies,” Miller said. “But what that will look like will depend on feedback we receive from the communities.”Tags: Middle Eastlast_img read more

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‘Defamation Experience’ aims to educate about diversity

first_imgThis week, Saint Mary’s will be hosting “The Defamation Experience”, a three-phase interactive event that aims to promote diversity in various settings. There are three phrases to the diversity program: the play, the deliberation and the post-show discussion. It is sponsored by the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), Multicultural Services and Campus and Community Events.“The Defamation Experience” was created and written by award-winning playwright Todd Logan. It premiered in November 2010. Logan wanted to write a play that encourages greater tolerance and understanding by spurring self-examination and promoting compelling civil discourse. According to “The Defamation Experience” website, the experience was first performed at DePaul University for an audience of 12, soon after President Barack Obama took office.“[It was] just a few months into the Obama Administration. It was an interesting time for American race relations, with some declaring our society ‘post-racial’ and others cautioning, as does one of the characters in the play, ‘just because Barack Obama is president, we’re a long way from a level playing field,’” Logan wrote on the Defamation Experience’s website.Sophomore Francesca Monsisvais said she hopes the Saint Mary’s community learns a lot from the experience and continue to promote diversity on campus.“Students of all majors should attend the experience because this form of discussion is much needed around our campus,” she said.CWIL director Mana Derakhshani said in an email she hopes the experience is beneficial for the Saint Mary’s community as the College seeks to deepen its diversity.“We hope to provide an opportunity for various College constituencies to engage in civil discourse around important issues regarding how people identify themselves and how that impacts their lives. We contacted a number of other institutions that had brought ‘The Defamation Experience’ to their campus and heard some very good reviews,” she said.The experience will take place Tuesday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Moreau Center for the Arts. It is free and open to the Saint Mary’s community and the public.Tags: Diversity, inclusion, saint mary’s, The Defamation Experiencelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s volleyball team and BAVO to host advocacy activities

first_imgTags: BAVO, domestic violence, Saint Mary’s volleyball To honor Domestic Violence Awareness month, the Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) — led by coordinator Liz Coulston — is hosting seven events throughout October.“Our goal is to end violence on the campus of Saint Mary’s in addition to in our community,” Coulston said. “We help students who have been sexually assaulted, a part of relationship violence or stalking in any way they need, whether recent or not.”BAVO is pairing up with the athletic department for their first event “Volley Against Violence” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday.“Belles Athletics has always been a big supporter of our cause and is always willing to partner with us on events,” Coulston said. “It’s also a great way to reach a different community than what some of our other events tend to reach.”During the volleyball game, there will be a number of activities in which attendees can participate. Both the Saint Mary’s Belles and their opponents, the Adrian Bulldogs, will be wearing purple ribbons in their hair to support the cause. Both teams are asking attendees to join them in wearing purple for the cause.“BAVO will have a table set up on the main floor of Angela to give out information regarding domestic violence along with a raffle for a couple of different prizes,” Coulston said. “We are also collecting non-perishable food items for the Family Justice Center. This food drive will be going on for the entire month of October with a bin to collect food at all of our events.”Throughout the next months, BAVO will also be partnering with the athletic department for a domestic violence awareness soccer game as well as a screening of the movie “At the Heart of Gold” about the USA gymnastics team. Sports information director Sarah Miesle works alongside Coulston to make these events possible.“The athletic department has been working with BAVO ever since it started around eight to nine years ago,” Miesle said. “Student athletes are a good resource on campus to spread this message. It is one thing for us to talk until we are blue in the face saying this is important but until it registers with students why it is important, we can only go so far.”Junior Meghan McNamara on the Student Advisory Committee for BAVO, along with a co-chair of Green Dot, a bystander intervention organization, said she finds this office to be an extremely important resource for Saint Mary’s students. She said she encourages other students to get involved by applying for one of BAVO’s four committees or even just attending events on campus.“Being a part of BAVO makes me feel like I am making a difference,” McNamara said. “I want girls to know that they are not alone, and they have people that will stand behind them and listen. This program has allowed me to see that it’s not always about who is helping, but it is also about how we are helping.”last_img read more

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Mid-Year Marks: 2019 Student Government Insider

first_imgDiane Park | The Observer Read below for all of the mid-year marks for the 2019 student government administrations of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s:Boyle, McGuire discuss mid-year progressSaint Mary’s SGA president reflects on semester of community-building during time of administrative transitionStudent government department reviewsSaint Mary’s SGA committee reviewsSenate examines finances, passes resolutionsStudent Union Board expands programming, empowers freshmen2019 Notre Dame Class Council Reviews2019 Saint Mary’s Class Council ReviewsStudent government plans civil discourse launch for next semesterND, SMC student government administrations discuss Midnight Express cancellationHPC encourages participation in dorm events, bridge with administrationTags: Elizabeth Boyle, HPC, Notre Dame Student Government, Patrick McGuire, Saint Mary’s Student Government Association, Student Government Insider 2019, Student Union Boardlast_img read more

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First-year retreats aim to foster multicultural community regardless of COVID-19 changes

first_imgCourtesy of Daryl Naquin Jr. First-year students gathered in the Stepan Center for the Black Student Ministry First Year Retreat on Saturady.In spite of COVID-19 protocols, many participants said they still enjoyed their retreat experience. “My favorite part was in the end when everyone was put into a circle, and we had popsicle sticks, and people stood up in terms of birthdays and tapped people they thought were their friends,” said first year student Iverson Sun, who attended the Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat. “It was a really sweet and wholesome thing.”Though the circumstances differed from usual retreats, sophomore Jerome Gan, Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat leader said he thinks the group managed to include everything that is traditionally a part of the Asian American Association.“That was a big success,” he said. “It showed because this morning, waking up to notes, texts, emails from table leaders, from all these first years who I met, and hearing all these positive experiences from them and all these kind words of affirmations really just make my day, my month and my year.”The retreat leaders, including Naquin, hope the first year students can carry friendships with them as they are about to embark on their college journeys. “The goal of The Plunge is to provide first years an opportunity to build community and also gain the wisdom that they need to help them on their journeys,” Naquin said. Gan said the same in reference to the Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat.“I really wanted to remind them that there’s a community when they need it, there is someone to be connected with and will be there for them, be the first years or be it upperclassmen within the Asian community. That’s why I wanted to lead it because I feel a sense of responsibility to these kids and to the community,” Gan said.While COVID-19 changes have made the first-year experience different, Gan said first-year students will make some of the most extraordinary memories in their life at the retreat.“COVID isn’t going to stop your year. This year is going to be as special as you make it out to be just as any other year would be,” Gan said. “Sure there are setbacks. It is tougher to meet people right now, but the resilience and the experiences that come out of this will be ones that you will cherish for a lifetime. I know that these kids are going to make the best out of it, and they’re going to go into this year and into next year prepared, strong, resilient, responsible.”Tags: African American community, Asian community, first year retreat, first year students, Multicultural Student Programs and Services Courtesy of Dylan Leupi The Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat took place Saturday in the Dahnke Ballroom.In light of the pandemic, the first-year retreats took place on campus in the Dahnke Ballroom for the Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat and the Stepan Center for the Black Student Ministry First Year Retreat.More than 50 first-year students, along with 28 leaders participated in The Plunge and around 120 first-year students along with 26 leaders participated in the Asian/Asian American retreat.The planning behind the retreats began in the summer and required team efforts to adjust to the COVID-19 protocols regarding spacing, catering and activities.“Throughout the planning process, we focused on what we called the three C’s,” said senior Daryl Naquin Jr., an anchor intern at Campus Ministry. “The three C’s were to cover, to build community and to commission. [The first-years] were coming with a lot of stuff on their hearts. Their senior year was vacated, and they were dealing with racial trauma throughout the past couple of months. But despite everything going on, God still has a purpose for them. That was what we were trying to convey through talks with them.” The Black Student Ministry First Year “Plunge” Retreat and Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat took place all day Saturday in an effort to connect first-year students and celebrate their backgrounds. Sophomore Dylan Leupi, an Asian/Asian American First Year Retreat leader, said the goal of the retreat was to introduce first years to a community on campus and make them aware that other students are here for them to help them embark on their journeys.last_img read more

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ND Dance Company to host annual showcase with COVID-19 safety precautions in place

first_imgThe Notre Dame Dance Company will host its annual showcase 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday in Washington Hall, following COVID-19 regulations.Dance Company president, senior Rachel Bartnett, noted that this is an impressive feat.“It’s been a really chaotic year with lots of back and forth on what rules can and can’t happen,” Bartnett said. “To be able to pull this off is kind of incredible. It’s kind of a miracle that we’re pulling it off.”Senior Jadrian Woods said coordinating this year’s show isn’t only notable because of the constraints of the pandemic, but because of how quickly it came together.“I’m just excited that we’re able to have a show this semester, and we were able to pull it off in six weeks, which is awesome because normally it’s anywhere from eight to 10,” Woods said.Junior Ana Tisa, a member of the Dance Company, said wearing masks has proven to be a new challenge during rehearsals.“We can’t touch each other or be close to each other,” Tisa said. “Obviously, we have to wear masks — which, surprisingly, I didn’t realize how hard it is to breathe in a mask. This is recreational; I don’t get how professional athletes are actually doing it. It must be so difficult.”Woods said there is a limit on how many dancers can be on stage at once for physical distancing purposes. Contrary to previous years, there can only be 12 or fewer dancers in each number. “Normally, we could let the choreographers have as many people as they wanted,” Woods said. “So that’s something that’s been very different this semester, but I think it’s also worked out really well because a lot more people have had more of an opportunity to dance because of that.”Dancers will need to maintain 10 feet of distance between each other at all times, as opposed to the traditional six feet. Tisa said this will change the ways the formations and interactions between dancers look this year.According to Bartnett, the audience will only be at roughly 40% capacity to allow for social distancing. Tisa said there will, however, be a livestream to allow for those who cannot attend, such as off-campus students and family members back home.Bartnett said the coronavirus has impacted the community aspect of Dance Company in both positive and negative ways. Although it can be harder to connect right now, she has seen how people go out of their way to form and maintain relationships.“[On Wednesdays], we’ve been doing dinners before rehearsal starts in either on a quad or in the dining hall,” Bartnett said. “So that’s been a really fun way for some of our new members to get to know some of the old kids. Just looking around at the tech rehearsal last night it’s very apparent that everybody seems to feel at home.”In a time of persistent change, Tisa said Dance Company has been a constant to her life.“We’re all just really excited to make this work, even though we don’t have our usual costumes and our usual audience and everything,” Tisa said. “It’s definitely been a nice sense of normalcy, a good constant semester to be like, ‘Okay, I can go dance with my friends,’ when a lot of other things have been canceled.”Tags: Dance, ND dance, ND dance company, pandemic, show, Washington Halllast_img read more

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Kristin Chenoweth Wants It All, NPH Buys His Bras at the Mall & More Lessons of the Week!

Star Files View Comments Kristin Chenoweth It’s almost time for Friday happy hour (oh, who are we kidding, we started drinking before lunch), but before the tipsy weekend Netflix binge begins, it’s time to revisit the interesting, wacky and completely ridiculous things we’ve learned over the last seven days. Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start…Leonardo DiCaprio Is a Broadway GentLeo, you have every excuse in the world to butt in line, frontsies or backsies. Instead, you waited at the Gentleman’s Guide bar like a real mensch. As a reward, we offer you any role on Broadway you want! Hurry up.Idina Menzel Rules, Beyonce DroolsFrozen star Idina Menzel’s response after kicking Queen B down to number two on the Billboard charts? “I’m sorry, Beyonce!” She didn’t sound too sorry, but let’s be serious: “Let It Go” is probably Bey’s favorite too.The Les Miz Cast Sucks at FrenchOK, we’re not expecting Ramin Karimloo, Will Swenson and the stars of Les Miserables to be fluent en francais, but everyone knows the “e” in “Enjolras” is a nasal vowel. Well, everyone who watches Show People.Joneses Might Feature James EarlAfter chatting with the star-studded cast of The Realistic Joneses, we still have no idea what this play is about. If James Earl Jones doesn’t do the “turn off your phone” announcements as Darth Vader, we’re gonna be seriously disappointed.Magic Carpets Have SeatbeltsBefore the stars of Aladdin take the old magic carpet for a spin, they have to do one very important thing: buckle up. That way, if they run into Mary Poppins, Peter Pan or Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, they can still file an insurance claim.Shh! Jessie Mueller Can Hear YouIn her video blog, Jessie Mueller politely told off the snack-eating, water-bottle-crinkling audience members sitting in the front row at Beautiful. Sorry, Jessie, but your gorgeous singing really makes us want potato chips.Three Chenoweths Are Better Than OneKristin Chenoweth has a trifecta of awesome stage roles in the works: Dolly in Hello Dolly!, Lily Garland in On the Twentieth Century (with Peter Gallagher!?) and Olive in a Pushing Daisies spin-off musical. All of the above, please!The FCC Can’t Bleep Elaine StritchElaine Stritch has been saying whatever the f*ck she wants for the last 89 years, but Kathie Lee and Hoda were f*cking shocked when the legendary leading lady dropped a surprise live F-Bomb on TV’s Today. F*ck yeah, Stritch!Audra McDonald Needs a New Tony ShelfThe five-time Tony winner will sing the blues as Billie Holiday in Lady Day on Broadway this season, and something tells us there’s a nice shiny award in it for her (cut to every other leading lady on Broadway this season yelling an Elaine Stritch-style F-bomb).Neil Patrick Harris Shops at Forever 21If the new cover of Time Out New York is any indication, Hedwig star Neil Patrick Harris is stocking up on bras for his Broadway return. Namely, bandeaus. We think he picked up this interesting ivory ensemble at Forever 21. Well, at least the price is right. read more

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Broadway.com Predicts the Tony Nominees for Performances in Musicals

first_img ALSO POSSIBLE Colin Donnell, Violet; Jake Epstein, Beautiful; Hunter Foster, The Bridges of Madison County; James Snyder, If/Then BROADWAY.COM SHOUTOUT IN THE MIX FRONTRUNNERS Left to Right: Adam Jacobs, Aladdin — Saddled with a cartoon costume, Jacobs is the warm and sunny center of a huge production, winning the hearts of audiences (and Princess Jasmine) while singing and dancing with aplomb. Steven Pasquale, The Bridges of Madison County — As the ultimate object of desire, Pasquale manages to be both sexy and self-effacing, and he and Kelli O’Hara kill Jason Robert Brown’s challenging score. Bryce Pinkham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder — An ideal foil for the antics of co-star Jefferson Mays, Pinkham makes us root for a murderer with his debonair performance as rags-to-riches hero Monty Navarro. Will Swenson, Les Miserables — Javert can be a thankless part, but Swenson infuses the unyielding Inspector with power and moral fervor, going toe to toe with Ramin Karimloo and making us see “Stars” in a new light. FRONTRUNNERS BROADWAY.COM SHOUTOUT BEST FEATURED ACTOR IN A MUSICAL FRONTRUNNERS Left to Right: Courtney Reed, Aladdin — Spunky Princess Jasmine is brought to life by raven-haired Reed, who sings and spars charmingly with her long-suffering father, Aladdin and every other guy who crosses her path. Michelle Williams, Cabaret — Three-time Oscar nominee Williams offers a daring take on Sally Bowles, emphasizing the singer’s kewpie-doll vulnerability and pulling out the stops in an emotional rendition of the title song. IN THE MIX Left to Right: Danny Burstein, Cabaret — The sweetest Herr Schultz imaginable, Burstein is superb at conveying the Jewish fruit seller’s romantic ardor and blindness to the looming danger of the Nazis in 1930 Berlin. Jared Grimes, After Midnight — Star dancers have a history of cracking the featured actor category, and show-stopping tapper Grimes, who moves with the grace of Fred Astaire, could find himself among this year’s chosen. Anthony Rapp, If/Then — Rapp does double duty as Idina Menzel’s nerdy BFF Lucas, falling in love with different people in the show’s two scenarios and keeping the audience involved throughout. Bobby Steggert, Big Fish — Before his current dramatic role in Mothers and Sons, Steggert sang the role of wistful Will Bloom, who longs to reconnect with his father (Norbert Leo Butz) before it’s too late. IN THE MIX Left to Right: Sutton Foster, Violet — What a gift to see Foster show a new side of her talent as Violet’s wounded yet resourceful title heroine, a moving, vanity-free performance that puts her in contention for Tony #3. Jessie Mueller, Beautiful — Mueller channels Carole King in a way that’s believable but totally her own—and her warm and winning star turn in this hit bio musical is a shoo-in for a Tony nod. Kelli O’Hara, The Bridges of Madison County — Will a fifth Tony nomination be the charm for O’Hara? Her acclaimed, gorgeously sung performance as lovestruck farm wife Francesca is operatic in scope. BEST FEATURED ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL Left to Right: Nick Cordero, Bullets Over Broadway — A “star is born” performance pushes Cordero toward a Tony nod as a bodyguard with a natural gift for play doctoring and the grace to lead a Susan Stroman dance number. Joshua Henry, Violet — Would a rural southern white woman in 1964 really fall in love with a black soldier she met on a bus? Uh, yeah, if the soldier could act and sing as gloriously as Joshua Henry. James Monroe Iglehart, Aladdin — Light on his feet and able to channel the entire Disney catalog, Iglehart’s sensational, sure-to-be-nominated Genie leads musical numbers that must be seen to be believed. BEST ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL Kate Baldwin, Big Fish — The calm center of this short-lived musical, Baldwin movingly conveyed love and pain as Sandra Bloom, a heroine caught between a volatile husband and wounded son.center_img It’s our favorite time of year—Tony season! There’s only one more day until we find out who will be nominated for this year’s trophies, and the Broadway.com staff has spent countless hours analyzing this year’s rough competition. After days of deliberation (and a few office fistfights), we present a list of our predictions—and trust us, it wasn’t easy. We’ve created a Tony forecast, including frontrunners, hopefuls and a Broadway.com Shoutout to actors we hope the nominators will remember. Check out our Tony Awards cheat sheet for performances in musicals! ALSO POSSIBLE Mary Bridget Davies, A Night With Janis Joplin; Krysta Rodriguez, First Date FRONTRUNNERS View Comments ALSO POSSIBLE Eric Anderson, Soul Doctor; Zach Braff, Bullets Over Broadway, Norbert Leo Butz, Big Fish; Zachary Levi, First Date Jarrod Spector, Beautiful — Composer Barry Weil could be a one-joke (hypochondria) role, but Spector deserves awards-season love for his witty portrait of a 1950s-era man secure enough to work with strong women. Left to Right: Linda Emond, Cabaret — Forget a pineapple: It’s a Tony nomination for Emond’s quietly shattering portrayal of Frau Schneider, the landlady who turns her back on love to remain safe from the rising Nazis. Anika Larsen, Beautiful — Larsen is pitch perfect as wisecracking songwriter Cynthia Weil, performing pop hits with gusto and painting a touching portrait of friendship with Jessie Mueller as Carole King. Lisa O’Hare, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder — As Edwardian-era golddigger Sibella, O’Hare turns in an amusing portrait of a narcissist that’s likely to catch the eye of Tony nominators. BROADWAY.COM SHOUTOUT Left to Right: Neil Patrick Harris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch — Who would’ve guessed that a transgender East German rock goddess would turn out to be the role Harris was born to play? Ecstatic reviews make the former host an instant Tony favorite. Andy Karl, Rocky — He’s thrilling in the boxing ring, but the key to Karl’s performance as Rocky Balboa is the romantic yearning and heartfelt quest for greatness he brings to an iconic role. A knockout! Jefferson Mays, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder — In a series of quick changes, Tony winner Mays plays eight members of the doomed D’Ysquith family, the kind of virtuoso comic juggling act Tony nominators can’t resist. Idina Menzel, If/Then — In this unusual new musical, Menzel deserves Tony love for pivoting between two versions of the same character with ease while performing diva-worthy power ballads for an adoring audience. BEST ACTOR IN A MUSICAL Left to Right: Lena Hall, Hedwig and the Angry Inch — In a season packed with female impersonators, Hall goes the other way as Hedwig’s loyal hubby Yitzak, nailing the show’s rock score and going glam at curtain call. Adriane Lenox, After Midnight — Bawdy, boozy Tony winner Lenox is a sassy delight singing “Go Back Where You Stayed Last Night” and more in Broadway’s re-creation of the Cotton Club. Marin Mazzie, Bullets Over Broadway – Three-time Tony nominee Mazzie is on familiar ground as a vain diva (see: Kiss Me, Kate) and she parries perfectly with a starry ensemble as Helen “Don’t Speak” Sinclair. Margo Seibert, Rocky — There can be no Rocky without Adrian, and newcomer Seibert shows the strength behind the character’s shyness, anchoring the show’s love story with a gorgeously sung performance. Lauren Worsham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder — Worsham combines an operatic soprano and off-kilter sensibility as Phoebe D’Ysquith, the only family member safe from murderous Monty Navarro. BROADWAY.COM SHOUTOUT Ramin Karimloo, Les Miserables — It’s hard to imagine anyone delivering a more intense, charismatic and beautifully sung Jean Valjean than Karimloo, who gives Les Miz a jolt of adrenaline and earns a Tony aisle seat. ALSO POSSIBLE Fantasia Barrino, After Midnight; Amber Iman, Soul Doctor; Nikki M. James, Les Miserables; LaChanze, If/Then; Caissie Levy, Les Miserables; Cass Morgan, The Bridges of Madison County; Helene Yorke, Bullets Over Broadway IN THE MIXlast_img read more

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