Husband, wife jailed for 80 years

first_imgBoxing Night murderBy Shemuel FanfairTwo weeks after being unanimously found guilty by a 12-member jury, Vishawantie Ragnauth, 38; and her reputed husband, Nyron Thakurdyal, 39, were on Tuesday sentenced to 40 years each in jail for murdering Ragnauth’s uncle.The couple was found guilty of the murder of 39-year-old miner Sunil Ramsundar on December 26, 2014, at Skull City, Patentia, West Bank Demerara.Moments after Justice Sandil Kissoon disclosed the term of imprisonment; the woman fell to her seat in tears and was escorted out of the courtroom in the same emotional state. Her accomplice, meanwhile, reacted to his sentence without much reaction.Ragnauth had earlier told the court that she was sorry for what happened and begged for forgiveness, while fellow killer Thakurdyal expressed his remorse and sympathy, telling the court he wanted to be a “constructive father” to his six children. Attorney Lisa Cave, who appeared for the prosecution, however deemed Ramsundar’s killing as senseless and unprovoked, stating the now deceased man was standing and cursing by himself when he was attacked.Deceased: Sunil RamsundarIn probation reports presented to the court, two contrasting life circumstances were disclosed. For Thakurdyal, it was stated that he migrated with his family to the United States in 1985 but was deported on a narcotics possession charge in 2003. However, the court learnt that he obtained a work permit and lived in The Bahamas for nine years where he did construction work. He later returned to Guyana where he sold hygienic products, making a living for himself.Thakurdyal came from Berbice and lived at Industry, East Coast Demerara, where he commenced the relationship with Ragnauth, whose past was described as “abusive”. In her report, the court heard that Ragnauth, a waitress, was mother to three children. It was observed that she was verbally and physically abusive to partners and during her second relationship, her husband whom she married according to Hindu rites, fled the home due to her abusive nature.Neighbours described the North Section, Canal Number Two native as an alcoholic who often behaved “disorderly”. The court heard that the woman allegedly sold marijuana and cocaine in the neighbourhood.After Attorney Hughes’ plea of mitigation, Justice Kissoon indicated that rather than 60 years, he started at a base of 50 years, in keeping with a recent Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) ruling. He subtracted a total of 10 years for time spent on remand, expression of remorse and Hughes’ plea which had appealed for mercy.The facts of the matter stated that Ramsundar was killed after he attempted to settle a dispute between his sister, his niece and his niece’s reputed husband. Around 22:00h on that fateful night, Ramsundar’s sister was being assaulted by her daughter Vishawantie and her partner, Nyron.At that time, the now deceased man asked his sister why she was crying, and upon learning about the assault, the man approached his niece for an explanation. However, this quickly turned into a heated argument, during which Ramsundar was stabbed about his body. Nyron Thakurdyal held the man while Vishawantie stabbed him. A teenaged eyewitness said that she passed the kitchen knife to her spouse who completed the attack.Ramsundar collapsed on the spot and was pronounced dead on arrival to the West Demerara Regional Hospital. After the duo stabbed the man, they ran away and flagged down a passing car. That vehicle happened to be that of an off-duty Policeman who said he heard the male offender say via his cellphone that he just “jook-up” someone. He then drove them in the Wales Police Station where they were subsequently arrested.Meanwhile, Government Pathologist, Dr Vivekanand Brijmohan in his testimony gave the cause of death as shock and haemorrhage; and a stab wound to the neck. The pathologist had told the jury that there were injuries to the right forearm, right chest, left part of the neck and jaw, noting that a puncture to an artery caused excessive blood loss.The late Ramsundar was described as a hard-working individual.last_img read more

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‘Taches to fight prostate cancer

first_imgSouth African men are urged to grow theirfurriest, funkiest moustaches to spreadawareness for prostate cancer.(Image: Grow Your Mo’)MEDIA CONTACTS• Nelia BlumrickGrow Your Mo’ campaign+27 82 316 [email protected] RELATED ARTICLES• SA scientist leads cancer fight • Rooibos yoghurt fights cancer • Top award for Rhodes scientist • Vaccine hope for SA womenKhanyi MagubaneSouth African men are being encouraged to ditch their razors and grow their thickest, furriest moustaches to get people talking about prostate cancer, a highly stigmatised condition that affects one in every six men.The first-ever Grow Your Mo’ drive, a quirky initiative of the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), is intended to help protect men across South African by raising the public’s awareness of prostate cancer-related issues and generating support for the PCF’s cancer-fighting efforts.PCF is hoping that this humorous and light-hearted idea will help spread the message to as many man as possible in a non-threatening way.All proceeds raised by the campaign, which runs from 15 to 30 September 2009 to coincide with Prostate Awareness Month, will be donated to the PCF.Campaign coordinator Nelia Blumrick says the drive got off to a great start: “This is the first time we’ve launched such a campaign. It’s actually been going really well, and once people started talking about it, it really started picking up.”“We started out by putting up the [Grow Your Mo’] Facebook group, and then the website, and then it started spreading by word of mouth,” says Blumrick.The campaign encourages participants to submit photos of their manly facial hair to the Grow Your Mo’ website and enter the Best mo’ on show competition. The best moustache each week during the 15-day campaign will be displayed for all to see in the Man of the Mo’ment frame on the site.“Every aspect of ‘Mo’-craft’ will be taken into account: length, shape, colour, grooming, luxuriance, novelty and so forth. The men who make names for themselves in this competition will go down in history as some of the finest specimens humanity has ever produced,” reads the website.At the end of the month there will be grand prize-winner, although the booty is being kept a secret.For those not so keen to sprout their whiskers, there’s a Mo money draw, which can be entered by sending a text message with your name to 40026 – the number is applicable only in South Africa, though. Messages cost R20 (US$2.69), which will be donated to PCF. Alternatively you can send a cash pledge to the organisation, the banking details of which are on the website.The campaign can also be followed on the social networking site, Twitter.What is prostate cancer?According to PCF, prostate cancer is the leading cancer among men in South Africa and more than 4 000 men are diagnosed with it every year.It occurs when cells within the prostate – a gland in the male reproductive system – grow uncontrollably and form a number of small tumours.If caught early surgery or radiation can effectively eliminate the tumours, but in its early stages the cancer produces few or no symptoms and can be difficult to detect.If untreated and allowed to grow, the cells from the tumours can spread in a process called metastasis. Prostate cancer cells are transported through the lymphatic system and the bloodstream to other parts of the body, where they lodge and grow secondary tumours.Once the cancer has spread beyond the prostate, chances of it being treated successfully are reduced.Early detection vitalAbnormal cell growth in the prostate can be detected early if men go for regular medical check-ups, where a digital rectal exam or Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test is carried out.If a blood sample reveals high levels of PSA, a protein produced in the prostate, there could be cause for concern.PCF says it’s unfortunate that men often know more about breast cancer than they do about prostate cancer, as it’s not as widely publicised.“I think most men are aware of it, but they don’t want to talk about it, because it has to do with their genital parts. I think if it were any other part of the body, it would be easier to talk about,” Blumrick adds.The older the man, the more susceptible he is to prostate cancer. In the US more than 65% of cases are found in men over the age of 65. Men who have had a parent or brother with prostate cancer, and those with a poor diet and lifestyle, are also more at risk.Although there are no clear-cut signs of prostate cancer, PCF says men should see a doctor promptly if the following symptoms occur:• A need to urinate frequently, especially at night• Difficulty starting urination or holding back urine• Weak or interrupted flow of urine• Painful or burning urination• Difficulty in having an erection• Painful ejaculation• Blood in urine or semen, or• Frequent pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips or upper thighs.last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 94 | Gov. DeWine talks agriculture

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In this episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, the team hears Gov. DeWine’s address at the recent Ag Day at the Capital, Ohio FFA State Officer Holly McClay’s take on 50 years of women in FFA, and Jack Irvin of Ohio Farm Bureau talks the latest issues in agriculture. All that and more from Matt, Dale, and Joel!last_img

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Curtly Ambrose says WI pacers don’t scare batsmen now

first_imgWest Indies cricket is in a shambles and its fast bowlers have forgotten how to intimidate batsmen, feels legendary pacer Curtly Ambrose who does not foresee a return to past glory for the team anytime soon.”The present standard is very, very bad and the only way interest can be revived is if we start winning some matches,” said Ambrose, who took 405 wickets from his 98 Tests.Ambrose is disappointed that West Indian fast bowlers have forgotten the art of intimidating batsmen.”I think it’s very important for a fast bowler to be intimidating. He must intimidate batsmen. I used to do it. I liked to soften them up,” he recalled.The giant fast bowler, who terrorised the best in the world throughout the 90s, feels slow pitches have contributed a lot to the decline of pacers in the Caribbean.”Two things have contributed to the downfall of West Indies cricket. Firstly, the pitches in the Caribbean have really slowed down and secondly, there is no deal of great experience which is being passed around in the dressing room,” he lamented.He recollected his early playing days when interaction with Malcolm Marshall helped him finetune his skills.”When I joined the team, I learnt a lot by just interacting with Malcolm Marshall, and later with Courtney Walsh. Now, these guys (the present team) have nobody to talk to; they are just sharing between them whatever little they have learnt from international cricket.”Even though Ambrose was aggressive, it never affected his economy. A third of his 3000-odd overs in Test cricket were maidens and his career economy rate was a mere 2.31 runs per over.advertisementHe didn’t play much against India but his affection knows no bounds for Sachin Tendulkar.”When I first watched him, it was in England in 1990 when he appeared a schoolboy. Yet watching him hit his first century at the age of 17, you knew here was a special talent,” he said.Two years later, they were squaring up in a World Cup game in Basin Reserve Park in Wellington and Ambrose dismissed Tendulkar with a delivery that kicked off from short of good length to take his outside edge.”He was a young guy and I was senior. So I needed to keep that equation,” Ambrose laughed.Being reluctantly pushed into cricket by his mother at a rather late age of 21, Ambrose made it to the West Indies team within three years. Yet, it took him the next two years to really start thinking about the game seriously.”The mantle of being world champions was falling off and a guy like me really had to learn very, very quickly. It helped that I was naturally very strong, very competitive and very aggressive,” he said.For the Antiguan, the toughest batsman he ever bowled to was David Boon of Australia, not to mention former Aussie skipper Steve Waugh with whom he nearly exchanged fisticuffs.However, Ambrose still has a great deal of respect for Waugh.It was the Trinidad Test of 1995 series against Australia. Waugh was repeatedly hit on the body by Ambrose’s bouncers.He let out his steam with a few chosen ones and enraged Ambrose to the extent he stood next to him, glaring and a physical contest wasn’t far away.”I really wanted to hit him. We were trailing the series. I was being frustrated. But we settled it then and there. It didn’t go beyond the pitch.”Ambrose though had the last laugh when he won the Test for West Indies and helped them square the series 1-1.– With PTI inputslast_img read more

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Ohio State Made Sure To Remind Recruits Of Its National Championship At Its Biggest Recruiting Event Of The Year Last Night

first_imgOhio State National Championship banner lit up at their stadium.Ohio State Friday Night LightsThe most important recruiting night of the year took place yesterday for the Ohio State football program. The Buckeyes held “Friday Night Lights,” their annual recruiting event under Urban Meyer that brings dozens of the top recruits in the country to Ohio Stadium for a workout camp that serves as a showcase to OSU’s coaches. The night went well. Ohio State got a couple commitments – a four-star tight end and one of the country’s top kickers – and made sure to remind the high schoolers of what happened this past January. Meyer had the highlights from the inaugural College Football Playoff title game playing on OSU’s jumbotron and unveiled the “2014” championship banner. Ready for an unveiling… pic.twitter.com/L8oS6YpNCF— Lori Schmidt (@LoriSchmidt) July 25, 2015More of that Urban Meyer testimony #OhioState pic.twitter.com/ycIFS8EBla— Jeff Svoboda (@JeffSvoboda) July 25, 2015Hype video time https://t.co/8vaaXgAlQw— Jeff Svoboda (@JeffSvoboda) July 25, 2015If you’re recruiting a prospect Ohio State wants, well, good luck.last_img read more

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JEOPARDY HOST ALEX TREBEK TALKS METOO MEETING JUSTIN TRUDEAU AND HIS RETIREMENT

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment “You know, when the #MeToo movement started, I had discussions with the staff during production meetings. I said, ‘My gosh, this has got to be a scary time for men,’” the 78-year-old said. “I’m fortunate that I’ve never been in a position of power where I might be able to lord it over somebody sexually. I said, ‘But there are guys out there — young guys are stupid in their teens.’ There’s nothing stupider than a teenage boy. They’re operating on testosterone.” Photo: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for TCM Advertisement Alex Trebek is already imagining what his final show will look like.The longtime “Jeopardy!” host sat down for a wide-ranging interview with Vulture, opening up about practically every issue under the sun.Speaking about the #MeToo movement, Trebek expressed concern for men who may have behaved badly when they were younger. Advertisementcenter_img Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Listen To Hot Takedown Our Sports Podcast Pilot

Some of what we mentioned on this week’s show:Benjamin Morris breaks down Pete Carroll’s call.Nate Silver: Are the Patriots the greatest dynasty ever?Did the Hawks put together the greatest month in NBA history?Grantland’s ode to Atlanta Hawks forward Al Horford.(This is part of the prelaunch experimentation for the FiveThirtyEight podcast. We’ll be posting audio of different kinds on SoundCloud and then launching the actual podcast this spring. Stay tuned! And let us know what you think by tweeting our podcast producer/host, @jodyavirgan, or emailing us.) By Jody Avirgan More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS Loyal FiveThirtyEight readers: This week we recorded a trial run of our new sports podcast “Hot Takedown,” and we’re eager for you to take a listen. We’re trying to add a little data perspective to the major storylines — and arguments — of the week.This episode, editor Chadwick Matlin, sportswriter Neil Paine and visual journalist Allison McCann discuss the Super Bowl and winning streaks in the NBA. FiveThirtyEight’s Reuben Fischer-Baum also stops by to provide this week’s “significant digit” — a historically bad free-throw performance in Brooklyn.Take a listen or download it below. read more

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Columbus Police sting operation led to Adolphus Washington solicitation citation

OSU senior defensive tackle Adolphus Washington speaks to the media during Big Ten Media Days in Chicago in July 2015. Credit: Kevin Stankiewicz | Assistant Sports EditorNewly released court documents show it was a Columbus Division of Police sting operation that led to the citation of senior defensive tackle Adolphus Washington.Washington was charged and released by the Columbus Police Vice Squad Unit on Wednesday night with a first-degree misdemeanor charge of solicitation for prostitution. The incident took place at the Extended Stay America hotel in Worthington, Ohio.An affidavit filed Friday by Columbus Police stated Washington first contacted an officer who was acting as a “decoy prostitute” in response to an ad posted by detectives on the classified advertising website Backpage.com.The advertisement was posted in the “escorts” section, stating “New to Columbus, Experience the Best.”Washington called the officer with a request to visit and asked for the address, before following up with a text message just after 10 p.m., according to the document. Washington texted again about 20 minutes later, stating he had arrived at the hotel.At 10:36 p.m., Washington entered the hotel room, where the decoy asked how long Washigton intended to visit, to which he responded, “a short stay.”The officer told Washington that a visit of that length would cost $60. However, after the officer stated she did not have change for Washington’s $100, Washington began to negotiate, asking, “Well, what will $100 get me?”The officer responded that $100 would pay for a one-hour visit. Washington agreed to the new price before placing his cash on the hotel dresser.The officer then offered Washington ”some head.” Upon agreeing to receive fellatio, Washington was detained by detectives, according to the document.OSU coach Urban Meyer announced that Washington has been suspended for the Jan. 1 Fiesta Bowl against Notre Dame. The game was scheduled to be Washington’s last with the Buckeyes.In a statement issued Thursday afternoon, Washington expressed remorse for his actions.“I want to sincerely apologize to my family, to coach Meyer and the coaching staff, to my teammates and my friends for my lack of judgement (Wednesday) night and for my actions that I truly regret. I have wanted to be a high-character teammate, a contributor to the success of this program and, most importantly, someone my family can be proud of,” he said in the statement. “I am extremely disappointed in myself, and I can honestly say I will learn from my mistake and I will accept the consequences that deservedly will come my way. And I hope that people will know that I am truly sorry and that I sincerely do apologize.”Washington’s arraignment is scheduled for Dec. 17.Wednesday’s citation was the second in less than two months for the Buckeyes, as redshirt sophomore J.T. Barrett was cited for operating a vehicle while intoxicated early in the morning of Oct. 31. read more

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Emma Baranski adds solo title to résumé for Ohio State synchronized swimming

OSU junior Emma Baranski won the solo national title on April 16. Credit: Courtesy of OSUAnother Ohio State athlete, synchronized swimmer Emma Baranski, has made a splash in the national circuit, as the junior won the solo national title during the U.S. Collegiate Championships.But this was not Baranski’s first brush with collegiate success. Last season, the OSU synchronized swimming team, which finished in second place this year, won the team title for the 29th time. The feelings following the victories, Baranski said, are different.“With team, you’re working together with seven other girls, so it’s amazing to get the team title,” Baranski said. “But as solo, it’s a lot more pressured because everyone’s eyes are right on you. Individually, it felt really good, and I was proud of myself just getting through it.”OSU coach Holly Vargo-Brown’s sentiments mirrored Baranski’s, saying that the sense of pride she receives from coaching an individual champion versus a team champion has its differences. “We are fortunate in that last year we had a team title, and we didn’t have an individual one,” Vargo-Brown said. “I think this year to have done that is some extra pride because in the midst of everything not necessarily going Ohio State’s way, to know that this person that worked so hard was rewarded, I think that was extra special.”In addition to the second-place team finish, the Buckeyes also placed second in the duets and had two trios tie for third. Baranski, who dabbled in figure skating and dance before becoming involved in synchronized swimming, is studying arts management with minors in dance and business. She said hopes to own a dance studio one day. A desire to participate in a team sport pushed the Hamden, Connecticut, native toward synchronized swimming, but she said her dance background has helped her in solo routines.“In the team routine, you’re swimming a lot sharper, and your goal is to be synchronized with everyone else. With a solo performance, you’re trying to be one with music almost,” she said. “From the very beginning of when you start to train a solo, you’re training almost a story and an emotional piece. “It’s more of a dance routine in the water.”The Buckeyes’ coaching staff assigned a primary coach for Baranski to help her build a bond with the choreography. That, alongside Baranski’s work ethic and skill set, is what Vargo-Brown said she believes helped the junior to find success.“Emma is amazing. She’s a very hard worker, and she really brings a passion to whatever part of the synchronized swimming that she’s working on,” Vargo-Brown said. “Because she is a dancer, she has really been able to improve on the expression that she brings to the performance, which I really think has helped her achieve the success that she has.” While synchronized swimmers are rewarded for making their routines look effortless, Vargo-Brown said she does not want the athleticism of the swimmers to go unnoticed.“Synchronized swimming is not what you see in the movies or the renditions of people making fun of it; these are athletes, and they train like athletes,” said Vargo-Brown, a former OSU synchronized swimmer who is in her fourth season at the helm. “They lift weights, they’re in the water and they can’t touch the bottom, they’re holding their breath and they really do have to be in the most-fit shape possible to accomplish all of that.”  The level of work that goes into synchronized swimming is not lost on Baranski, who said that staying ahead of the competition is the hardest part. With a dream to participate in Cirque du Soleil’s synchronized swimming show in Las Vegas, she knows it won’t come easy.“It’s pretty competitive and it’s very international. You have the best talent from all over the world coming to Cirque du Soleil, so the competition is first,” Baranski said. “You really can’t stop training, it’s just go, go, go all the time.” read more

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Urban Meyer Ohio State enter first game week of 2013

Lantern file photoThen-sophomore Ryan Shazier overlooks the sidelines during a game against Michigan State on Sept. 29, at Spartan Stadium. OSU won, 17-16.It is officially game week for the 2013 edition of the Ohio State Buckeyes football team, and coach Urban Meyer said football is all he wants to talk about.“I just can’t wait to play football,” Meyer said Monday, deflecting a question asking if he is the same guy he was when he coached at the University of Florida. “All due respect, I just want to answer questions about football.”A constant throughout camp has been talk about how impressive younger players such as freshmen Dontre Wilson, Ezekiel Elliot, Jalin Marshall and Joey Bosa have been performing and how they are expected to contribute right away. Meyer said a few of those freshmen will see the field against Buffalo.“For sure, Dontre Wilson and Ezekiel Elliot will play,” Meyer said. “On defense, Joey Bosa for sure will play.”Offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Tom Herman said OSU would “be foolish” not to let Wilson touch the ball on offense, but doing so is a delicate balance.“I think that you have to be careful with a true freshman that has to play some running back, has to play some wide receiver, has to flex out and run routes,” Herman said. “So the package will be small to start the year off, and let him become an expert at the few things we are asking him to do.”Meyer said Wilson is “going to return the opening kickoff of the 2013 football team,” but is more “anxious” to see how he reacts to being in front of a large crowd at Ohio Stadium.“I think coaches have a tendency to devalue what happens when you jog out that tunnel, especially at a place like Ohio Stadium,” Meyer said. “There will be a lot of deep breaths being taken and you just can’t create that animal until you get that opportunity.”Senior safety C.J. Barnett called the feeling he got when he ran out onto the field for the first time at the Horseshoe “unexplainable,” but has simple advice for Wilson for Saturday’s opening kickoff.“The only thing I could tell him is just take a deep breath and he’s out there for a reason,” Barnett said. “We all have confidence in him that he can get the job done, so just relax.”Another position that younger, more inexperienced players could see time at is running back, due to both senior Carlos Hyde and redshirt-junior Rod Smith being suspended for three and one games, respectively. Meyer, however, said he is not worried about the spot, thanks to the return of redshirt-senior Jordan Hall from the injuries that plagued him in 2012.“Jordan Hall is the best running back on our team right now, and so he’ll have to lose that spot,” Meyer said. “Bri’onte Dunn and Warren Ball are the next two in, and we want to get Ezekiel (Elliot) in to see how he responds in that kind of environment.”Meyer also said Wilson could see some time at running back, depending on the offensive sets they go with, but for the time being, Hall is the guy.“Jordan is a little smaller but he is arguably one of the toughest guys pound-for-pound on our team,” Meyer said.During OSU Media Day Aug. 11, Meyer spoke about how there were four or five units on the team that were causing him to be uncomfortable as fall camp came to a close. His thoughts on those units have since changed.“Offensive line, I feel very good about (it),” Meyer said. “Quarterback, feel very good about. The receivers (are) probably one of the most improved areas on our team. Running back feel very good about.”There is one position, however, that Meyer believes the team is still lacking at: linebacker.“The area we are still trying to solidify is linebacker,” Meyer said. “Curtis Grant has not really played a whole lot of Mike (middle) linebacker, but he’s catching up quick.”Meyer noted how Grant is behind because he suffered a concussion during training camp, but is doing his best to get on the same level as his teammates before Saturday.Defensive coordinator and linebackers coach, Luke Fickell said Grant is in a tough position, because even though he is a junior, he has yet to see consistent playing time.“A guy that’s a junior in college maybe wouldn’t miss a beat because he’s been here for two years and had a lot of experience,” Fickell said. “But the reality is he has not had a whole (lot) of game experience.”Junior linebacker Ryan Shazier echoed his position coach, but said the inexperience goes beyond just Grant.“I feel like the biggest concern right now is because we have a lot of inexperience and a lot of young guys,” Shazier said. “When we get a lot of guys that haven’t played together, it’s kind of a struggle.”Fickell said even though the concussion set the starting middle linebacker back, he still has confidence in him.“The reality is if that was a freshman that missed 10 or so days or 10 practices or something like that, you would be much more worried,” Fickell said. “I’m not worried about Curtis Grant, because his passion and his energy is what’s going to show.”According to Meyer, the team held a meeting Monday afternoon to decide the 2013 captains. An OSU athletics spokesman told The Lantern that the decision has not been made as of late Monday evening.Kickoff against Buffalo is scheduled for 12 p.m. Saturday at Ohio Stadium. read more

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