Nigel Hall Announces Two Shows In One Night at NYC’s Blue Note Jazz Club

first_imgOn Monday, June 27th, New Orleans-based, D.C. native Nigel Hall will headline New York City’s Blue Note Jazz Club for two shows in one night. The singer and musician that many of us know from his regular stint with funk powerhouse Lettuce, has carved out his own niche in the funk and jazz world’s, displaying a musical pedigree that spans generations, having grown up the greats such as Stanley Clarke and Chick Corea, and collaborating with musicians such as Warren Haynes, Oteil Burbridge, Soulive, Questlove, Jon Cleary, and many more. Nigel Hall w/ Lettuce “Baby I Do Love You” – Blue Note, NYC – 11/16/15, courtesy of Skebetine:With the release of his solo album, Ladies and Gentlemen…Nigel Hall, this past November (which boasted two sold-out album release shows at the Blue Note), Hall has kept busy down in New Orleans, constantly working on new music while traveling around the country performing. NOLA-based publication The Times-Picayune went so far as to call him the next Art Neville, which is no small feat. Mark it on your calendars, because this will be a show to not miss!Get Tickets – 8:00 PMGet Tickets – 10:30 PMTake a listen to Ladies And Gentlemen…Nigel Hall:last_img read more

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A story that doesn’t hold up

first_imgIt’s one of the most common plot twists in Hollywood — caught red-handed, the murderer claims to suffer from multiple personality disorder, says he has no memory of the crime, and points the finger at an alternate personality.A new study, however, suggests such a scenario belongs strictly to the realm of fiction.The study — conducted by Harvard’s Richard J. McNally, Rafaele Huntjens of the University of Groningen, and Bruno Verschuere of the University of Amsterdam — casts doubt on the “amnesia barrier” that has long been a hallmark of what is now called dissociative identity disorder (DID) by demonstrating that patients do have knowledge of their other identities. Huntjens was lead author of the study, which was reported in a paper published in PLoS One on July 17.“Ultimately, this disorder is a way of expressing distress,” said McNally, a professor in the Department of Psychology. “What we have shown is that a fundamental idea behind the concept of DID — that there is amnesia between identities — there’s no convincing evidence for that.”About a century ago, Morton Prince, a Harvard-educated neurologist working in the Boston area, coined the phrase “multiple personality disorder” to describe the case of Sally Beauchamp, an Arlington woman who appeared to have two personalities.Reports of DID, which is sometimes confused with schizophrenia, were rare in the 20th century, with only a few dozen cases appearing in the literature. With the publication of “Sybil” (1973), however, the condition entered the mainstream. The story of Sybil Dorsett, a woman who claimed to have as many as a dozen personalities, became an international sensation. There were two film adaptations.Diagnoses of DID rose sharply through the next two decades. In addition to raising the public profile of the disorder, the book also marked the first suggestion that alternate personalities were created as a way to wall off traumatic memories of physical or sexual abuse, and that those memories could be recovered with the help of a therapist.“The idea at the time was that the mind locks these memories away, but with the help of a therapist, and through hypnosis or the use of drugs like Sodium Pentothal, these memories could become accessible,” McNally said.To understand whether there truly is an “amnesia barrier” between a DID patient’s identities, McNally and colleagues conceived a unique experiment.Where earlier studies had simply asked questions, with no way to be sure the answers were truthful, the test described by McNally was intentionally designed to “fool” patients, making fakery nearly impossible.Called a “concealed information task,” the test’s goal is ostensibly simple: identify words as they flash on a computer screen. If one of a small set of randomly selected “target” words appears, press yes. For all other words, press no. The catch, McNally said, is that while many of the words hold no meaning for the patients, a small subset of the non-target words are taken from two autobiographical questionnaires patients fill out at the start of the test — one while inhabiting one personality, the second in another.When one of those personally relevant words — such as a best friend’s name, favorite food, or favorite sport — appears on screen, McNally said, most patients’ first impulse is to press the yes button. Within moments, however, they realize the word doesn’t appear on the target list, and they eventually give the “correct” answer by pressing no.It’s that “processing lag” — measured in milliseconds — that demonstrates patients “know” a word is personally relevant, McNally said. If the amnesia between identities were real, that lag — the time it takes to recognize a word, realize it is not on the target list, and press the correct button — should all but disappear.The results showed just the opposite.As expected, the lag appeared for words that were relevant to the personality taking the test. All participants showed a nearly identical lag for words that were relevant to their alternate personalities, McNally said, suggesting that the information wasn’t locked away in a separate identity.“For DID patients, the increase in reaction time was noticeable,” McNally said. “This shows that this information is leaking across the so-called amnesic barrier. The issue here is whether one identity is genuinely amnesic for information that is supposedly only accessible to the other identity, and the answer appears to be no.”McNally said that those who claim to be suffering from the disorder may be reacting more to cultural expectations than psychological realities.“For people who suffer from it, this disorder is ultimately a way to express distress,” McNally said. ????Cultures provide certain envelopes for people to express suffering or psychological pain and DID is one such cultural trope. In the 19th century, women would do that by getting the ‘vapors’ and swooning — you don’t see that anymore. Quite frankly, I don’t think much would be lost if the diagnosis were eliminated from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual — people will simply begin expressing their suffering in different ways that are more tractable to treatment.”last_img read more

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Second Stage’s Season Will Include Plays by Terrence McNally & Neil LaBute

first_img The Way We Get By follows Beth and Doug, two people who wake up together following a drunken wedding reception they both attended. Forced to question how much they really know about each other and how much they care about what other people think, the two face a very awkward encounter revolving around love, lust and the whole damn thing. In Lips Together, Teeth Apart, a brother and sister and their spouses spend a Fourth of July weekend in a Fire Island beach house. Thrown into a gay paradise, they do their best to enjoy themselves despite their prejudices and insecurities. Second Stage Theatre has announced two shows for its 2014-15 season. Tony winner Terrence McNally’s acclaimed comedy Lips Together, Teeth Apart will receive its first New York production in 23 years, under the direction of Peter Dubois, beginning October 7. Additionally, the world premiere of Tony nominee Neil LaBute’s The Way We Get By will debut in summer 2015. View Comments McNally, who received a Tony nomination this season for Mothers and Sons, has won Tony Awards for Love! Valour! Compassion! and Master Class, as well as for the books to the musicals Ragtime and Kiss of the Spiderwoman. He was a 1994 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his play A Perfect Ganesh. LaBute received a Tony nomination for Reasons to be Pretty; his other plays include The Shape of Things, Fat Pig, Some Girl(s), In a Dark House and Reasons to be Happy.last_img read more

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Other Sports Vinesh Phogat becomes first Indian to be nominated for Laureus World Sports Award

first_imgVinesh is first Indian to be nominated for Laureush Sports AwardVinesh won gold in both CWG and Asian Games in 2018Vinesh lost in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Rio Olympics The Laureus World Sports Awards is an annual award ceremony honouring individuals and teams from the world of sports along with sporting achievements throughout the year. It was established in 1999 by Laureus Sport for Good Foundation founding patrons Daimler and Richemont. he awards support the work of Laureus Sport for Good, which supports over 100 community projects in around 40 countries. These projects aim to use the power of sport to end violence, discrimination and disadvantage, and prove that sport has the power to change the world. The name “Laureus” is derived from the Greek word for laurel, considered a traditional symbol of victory in athletics. highlights New Delhi: Vinesh Phogat has given Indian wrestling a massive shot in the arm and has made the country proud in 2019. The star wrestler, who enjoyed a magnificent run in 2018, has been nominated for the prestigious Laureus World Sports Award in 2019. She has been nominated in the Laureus “World Sporting Comeback” category for the year and her other competitors are golfing great Tiger Woods, Canadian snowboarder Mark McMorris, American alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn, Japanese figure skater Yuzuru Manyu, and Dutch para-snowboarding star Bibian Mentel-Spee. Kenyan marathon world record-breaker Eliud Kipchoge, tennis world No 1 Novak Djokovic and NBA great LeBron James are the others.Vinesh was one of the upcoming stars in the world of wrestling and was in a good position to win a medal in the 2016 Rio Olympics. However, in the women’s freestyle 48kg quarterfinal against China’s Sun Yanan, she injured her knee badly and many feared that she may not be able to wrestle again. However, doctors said that it was a tendon tear and not a fracture and that she would regain fitness again.In 2018, Vinesh became the golden girl of Indian wrestling. She won gold in Women’s Freestyle 50 kg event by defeating Canada’s Jessica MacDonald in the 50 kg category to win India’s first gold in the women’s wrestling category at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast. In the 2018 Asian Games, she created history as she became the first Indian woman wrestler to win gold in the Asian Games by beating Japan’s Yuki Irie in Women’s 50 kg Freestyle Wrestling gold medal match. With her performances in the Commonwealth Games and Asian Games, Vinesh is one of the best bets for a medal in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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