Professionalism Committee touts ethics video series

first_img October 15, 2003 Daniel Staesser Assistant Editor Regular News Professionalism Committee touts ethics video series Professionalism Committee touts ethics video series Assistant EditorAbout 10 years ago, Miami attorney Paul Lipton recognized some of his family members weren’t getting any younger. He wanted to do something to preserve, for his children and his children’s children, a glimpse into the life, achievements, and philosophies of people who encouraged and shaped him over the years.Then it hit him.Many of the people who had helped to shape who he had become professionally were legal legends, great legal minds and leaders, some of whom were advancing in age and had not yet been memorialized.“I saw how much it meant to my family and I wanted to do something for the legal profession,” said Lipton.That’s when Lipton took his idea to some of those he wanted to capture on video, including U.S Southern District Judge William Hoeveler. He told Judge Hoeveler the concept, and the two of them sat down with tape rolling.Lipton then took the project before The Florida Bar’s Standing Committee on Professionalism, and showed a brief part of the video.“They were just enthralled,” said Lipton, who would become a member of the committee and his project a representation of the ideals of the committee. The videos became the Bar’s Professionalism Center’s Historical Video Series.“The concept was always one of sitting down with people you would love to sit down with for a cup of coffee and just have a pleasant conversation.”Pleasant, but poignant. Who are you? How did you get to be who you are? Why the law?Lipton asked questions to which all responses varied, but one universal thread ran throughout — a thread he referred to as a sort of sense of humanity.“These are not just judges or lawyers, but they feel that they are a part of a larger process, a universal process,” said Lipton, who explained the spiritual connection that many of his interviewees had eluded to.“[For them] it’s not about you and me. It’s not about paying the bills — it’s about a purpose on a grand scale.”Lipton, whose idea has been carried on by the standing committee, said he has become a better person because of the example set by these mentors. He noted among his favorite interviewees Judges David Dyer, Lenore Nesbitt, and Rosemary Barkett, the latter of whom he remembered advising that “a young lawyer can contend without being contentious.”“These are people that are generous and thoughtful, and they make a difference in the most positive way,” said Lipton, who says that upon seeing the videos, viewers will walk away with a greater sense of the importance of law.Robert Fiore, vice chair of the Standing Committee on Professionalism, said the historical video series is a great way to recognize and pass down “the invaluable wisdom of the true giants of the profession.”Fiore, who has helped to continue Lipton’s vision, said that many of these legends’ teachings go far beyond the practice of law, mentoring young lawyers on how to become outstanding human beings.Moved by the responses, Lipton wanted a feel not only for the professional, the lawyer, the judge, that he interviewed, but also for the person and their philosophy on life.“I always liked to ask things like, ‘When it is your darkest hour and things just haven’t gone right, what gives you strength?’”“I’ve found that when that happens, I look at the spiritual connection,” said Lipton. “[I think] that this is all part of a cycle, like a hurricane, and that if I can just stay in the calm of the eye of the storm I can handle it, as opposed to being one of those people being blown around.”“Professionalism has come a long way,” said Fiore. “We intend to continue this for as long as it takes.”The 37-video collection, each of which is approved for one hour of professionalism CLE credit, and which includes an interview with the late Chesterfield Smith, can be ordered from the Center for Professionalism’s Web site by going to www.flabar.org, clicking on the professionalism link on the left hand side, and scrolling down to Historical Video Series. The videos sell for $35.last_img read more

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Degree53 hires Andy Furnival as new technology lead

first_img Gamesys tops list for GambleAware Q1 donations July 10, 2020 SBC Magazine Issue 10: Kaizen Gaming rebrand and focus for William Hill CEO August 25, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articles Share William Hill accelerates transformation agenda to overcome COVID realities August 5, 2020 Industry design, innovation and software development agency Degree53 has strengthened its technology division through the appointment of Andy Furnival as Technical Director. Furnival, who previously held the position of Head of Technology at William Hill, will be tasked with managing Degree53’s technology strategy, as well as the oversight all of the technical teams, and support to the leadership team.As part of his new role, he will lead the technology and development strategy, working with development, infrastructure, architecture, DevOps and DBA teams. Furnival will work with them to ensure a clear and achievable strategy to drive operational procedure at Degree 53 in order to provide products and functionalities to their clients. Andrew Daniels, Managing Director at Degree 53, commented on the new appointment: “I’m very pleased that Andy has joined Degree 53 and he will be a brilliant asset in leading our technical development. Since establishing a gaming division two years ago, we’ve been heavily investing in technical talent to build high-end products for the online gambling industry. “Over this period, we’ve recruited solution architects, database administrators, automation testers and infrastructure engineers. All of this is part of our drive to create state-of-the-art technology for operators to improve their services and bring innovation to the industry. “I’m very proud of what we’ve already achieved and how many skilled individuals Degree 53 has hired over this time. Andy brings unrivalled expertise and leadership capabilities that will drive our development. I welcome Andy to the team and am confident he will transform our technical capabilities.”During his time at William Hill, Furnival’s responsibilities included managing strategic projects, such as maintaining compliance and regulatory standards, as well as streamlining sportsbook platforms.He oversaw three business divisions with over 130 employees spread across Europe. His role was to implement technical strategy and establish an efficient operating model with good working practices to be able to scale it in response to business demands.Furnival added: “I am extremely happy to be joining such a modern company that places technical expertise and innovation at its core.  I’m a firm believer in a learning culture and striving for continuous improvements, and that strategic goals must be balanced with pragmatism but always with a clear purpose of delivering value.”“My approach is to establish a working environment that allows teams to make efficient and effective decisions through a culture of trust, learning and safety. I believe that with my background in product development and strategy at the operator side, I will lead our teams to deliver even more robust and scalable products for our clients.” Share Submitlast_img read more

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Remembering the Mars Blackmon-Air Jordan baseball commercial with Musial, Mays, Griffey and Buckner

first_img (YouTube screengrab) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/27/27/blackmon-musial-042920-ftrjpg_mpyqvzt8fp541jw4slh4h9k87.jpg?t=-924970855&w=500&quality=80 But Mars and Michael teamed up for a Nike baseball commercial, too. You might not remember that one from 1994 (I didn’t, to be honest). Watch.MORE: Michael Jordan’s legacy wasn’t complete at 28, and neither is Mike Trout’sIt’s great, right? So good to see baseball legends in the spot with MJ, next to Spike Lee.Stan Musial, the Cardinals Hall of Famer who passed away in 2013 at 92 years old, was the first smiling face. I asked Brian Schwarze, Musial’s grandson and caretaker late in Musial’s life, what Musial told him about the experience. He just started laughing.“Spike Lee had turned to him and his line was supposed to be, ‘He’s no Stan Musial, but he’s trying,’” Schwarze said. “And Spike Lee said, ‘He’s no Stan Musial.’ And Stan looks at Spike and says, ‘You’re right, he is no Stan Musial.’”Musial played 22 seasons with the Cardinals — he spent 1945 in the military — and retired with 3,630 hits (then a National League record), 475 home runs and a .331 batting average. He won three NL MVP awards and finished as the runner-up four other times. Schwarze said the commercial was a highlight for Musial, who was 74. “Oh, yeah, he had fun, as Stan always did,” Schwarze said. “He liked meeting everybody, and it was pretty cool to be in a commercial like that. It was a pretty short and sweet day for Stan. I would think that was his biggest commercial, especially on the national level. He did stuff locally, for Midas and a couple other places, but nothing like that.” MORE: 10 times Ken Griffey Jr. invaded pop culture in the ’90sThe final guest star was Bill Bucker, and both Jordan and Nike take a little dig at Jordan’s still-developing baseball skills. Lee says, “Michael’s no Bill Buckner.” The ball rolls between Jordan’s legs, and Buckner — a vastly underrated player known mostly for his infamous World Series error in 1986 — grins and says, “But he’s trying!”It’s a well-done commercial — no surprise there — and a nice nod to baseball legends. Willie Mays was up next. Mays, who earned 11 Gold Gloves, stole 338 bases and had a career 154.6 bWAR, watches Jordan running down a fly ball in the outfield. Lee says, “Say Hey! He’s no Willie Mays!” And Mays smiles and says, “But he’s trying!”Then came Ken Griffey Jr., who was at the time baseball’s brightest star, but at 24 years old still a long way from his eventual Hall of Fame induction. He watches Jordan slide, swing and field the baseball and Lee says, “He’s no Ken Griffey.” Junior nods and says, “Yeah, but he’s trying.” When talking about Michael Jordan’s impact on American pop culture, the Mars Blackmon commercials take up a large part of that conversation. As they should. They’re unforgettable (Spoiler, though: It wasn’t just the shoes). Spike Lee’s character, which was originally created by Lee for the movie “She’s Gotta Have It,” was the perfect match for Jordan and his Air Jordan brand.last_img read more

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