Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Elaine Thompson shine in Diamond League events

first_imgBahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Jamaican Elaine Thompson held the Caribbean flag high in Diamond League meets in Europe recently. Miller-Ubio twin victories Miller-Uibo added the 400 meters Diamond Trophy to the 200m version she had won a week earlier in Zurich at the first of two IAAF Diamond League finals, clocking a world-leading 49.46 at the AG Insurance Van Damme Memorial in Brussels on Friday.The Olympic 400 meters champion had appeared on the brink of adding a world title at her specialist distance in London last month before faltering and dropping out of the medals 20 meters from the line.But she has finished her season on a high with Diamond Trophies in Zurich and now Brussels. Her wins have earned her a total of US$100,000 under the revised rewards for this year’s series, which carried a prize total of US$1.6million.In Friday’s race Miller-Uibo needed to drive all the way to the tape. She was challenged by 19-year-old Bahrain athlete Salwa Eid Naser, who beat both Allyson Felix and world 400m champion Phyllis Francis at last month’s IAAF Diamond League meet in Birmingham. Eid Naser took second place in 49.88. Elaine Thompson redeems Jamaica’s Olympic 100 meters and 200 meters champion Elaine Thompson, who failed to earn a medal at last month’s IAAF World Championships in London, finished her season with a victorious flourish, earning a second consecutive Diamond Trophy in the women’s 100 meters at the Brussel’s event.Thompson admitted on the eve of this final that she’d had “a funny season” so far, having achieved the best 2017 time of 10.71 for the 100 meters in her native Kingston before her London flop.Since then Thompson has had an encouraging turn of fortunes. She had a 100-meter victory at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Birmingham in 10.93. This was followed by second place in last week’s 200 meters at the IAAF Diamond League final in Zurich in a time of 22.00 secs.The talented sprinter won the 100 meters in Brussels in a time of in 10.92, holding off the challenge of Marie-Josee TaLou of the Ivory Coast who earned silver at 100 meters and 200 meters in London. Ta Lou, was second in 10.93, while Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare-Ighoteguonor was third in 1.07.Thompson earned $50,000 for her season’s efforts.last_img read more

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David Clifton: Licensing Expert – GBGA Tax Ruling… Are all bets now off in Gibraltar?

first_imgShare StumbleUpon Related Articles Submit David Clifton, Licensing Expert: Has the die already been cast? July 15, 2020 Share EU research agency demands urgent action on loot box consumer safeguards July 29, 2020 David CliftonAlmost a year ago, the Government of Gibraltar issued a statement following the Brexit vote in which it said that it had been working closely with the remote gambling industry in Gibraltar following that vote and had assured them of its support and vision for the sector in the short, medium and long term. It went on to confirm that the sector remained strongly committed to its Gibraltar operations and that business would continue as usual.One cannot help but wonder how long that optimism will last, not because of the additional uncertainties created by the recent UK General Election result, but instead by reason of the recent judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) in relation to the legal challenge brought by the Gibraltar Betting and Gaming Association (“GBGA”) against the UK’s place of consumption gambling tax regime that came into force on 1 December 2014.The CJEU’s ruling that “the provision of services by operators established in Gibraltar to persons established in the UK constitutes, as a matter of EU law, a situation confined in all respects within a single Member State”  came as no surprise given an earlier finding to similar effect by a CJEU Advocate General in January. However, it serves to seriously (if not fatally) undermine the GBGA’s claim that gambling operators based in Gibraltar (but licensed by the Gambling Commission in Great Britain) should not be subject to gambling tax obligations in the UK because they constitute:extraterritorial taxes,an obstacle to the freedom to provide services anddiscrimination against service providers established outside the UK.The GBGA has also contended that such taxes cannot be justified by the objectives claimed by the UK Government, which are essentially of an economic nature and, as a consequence, it maintains that the new tax regime is incompatible with the EU Treaty.However, in a detailed judgment published on 13 June, involving deep complexities of EU Treaty provisions and previously decided case-law, the CJEU has effectively put paid to the force of those arguments.Back in January, following publication of the Advocate General’s Opinion, Peter Howitt, the CEO of the GBGA expressed his members’ disappointment but said that they “continue to believe that the gambling duty applied by the UK government to operators out of the jurisdiction, in circumstances where the customer may not be in the UK when they gamble or even a UK resident, is a disproportionate restriction on operators”.As I write this piece, no further statement has been published by or on behalf of the GBGA which must now be facing an expectation that the High Court in London will find against it as and when the case reverts to it for its judgment, to which the CJEU ruling will be applied.The Spanish newspaper, El País, will have provided little comfort, commenting that the judgment has “deepened the crisis of the business model that has driven growth for Gibraltar’s online gambling industry. In the last two decades, gambling operators have flourished thanks to the favourable tax regime in the overseas territory. If Brexit created an initial sense of unease, there is palpable uncertainty now with regard to the 3,252 direct jobs created by the 33 Gibraltar-based gambling companies that now face the prospect of losing competitiveness to other desirable locations, such as Malta or the Isle of Man”.By way of contrast, the Government of Gibraltar has once again struck an optimistic note, stating that “in normal circumstances, HM Government of Gibraltar would have been disappointed with such a ruling, as a result of Brexit and the commitments already made by the UK Government to Gibraltar in relation to access to the UK market” but that it nevertheless “does not consider that the judgment will have any significant effect, whether on the online gaming sector or more generally”. In what many may consider to be excessive optimism, it concludes by suggesting that “indeed, the judgment may provide a different, and strengthened, perspective on Gibraltar’s position in the Brexit negotiations, as part of the same UK single market for the purposes of EU Law”. I will not be alone in wishing well all operators based in Gibraltar, particularly given the disclosure at the end of March that EU draft guidelines for Brexit negotiations would effectively give Spain a veto over Gibraltar’s future. Its 10% corporate tax rate, compared with 19% in the UK and 25% in Spain, coupled with high AML standards, should continue to make the territory an attractive location for businesses but gambling operators based there will no longer be able to benefit from European law arguments regarding access to EU markets and will inevitably face increasing costs if Spain closes its border, raising serious viability questions. 888 Holdings may not be the only Gibraltar-based operator considering a relocation of its main base to Malta, in order to maintain a guaranteed free cross-border movement of people, goods, services and capital in a post-Brexit Europe.A year ago, the GBGA published its own statement. It said: “At the moment and for the foreseeable future there is no change to the existing legal and political framework that our operators work within. We also note that European countries already have widely different regulatory regimes and many require our operators to have local licences – the impact on our members is therefore likely to be minimal. Periods of wide-spread political uncertainty highlight the need to be based in a territory that supports your business and sector at the highest level. We have a very supportive government and regulators. We have access to a wealth of human talent and experience in online betting and gaming.  The UK and EU political crisis makes us keenly aware why Gibraltar remains a great place to do European and international trade. Gibraltar is an internationally recognised success story and we intend to keep it that way.I, for one, hope that the CJEU judgment and what is, in my view, an inevitable further blow when the High Court issues its own judgment, will not dampen that obvious enthusiasm to maintain the success of the online gambling industry in Gibraltar for many years to come._____________________David Clifton – Director – Clifton Davies Consultancy [email protected] Europol warns of ‘greater risk’ of match-fixing during pandemic August 7, 2020last_img read more

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Degree53 hires Andy Furnival as new technology lead

first_img Gamesys tops list for GambleAware Q1 donations July 10, 2020 SBC Magazine Issue 10: Kaizen Gaming rebrand and focus for William Hill CEO August 25, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articles Share William Hill accelerates transformation agenda to overcome COVID realities August 5, 2020 Industry design, innovation and software development agency Degree53 has strengthened its technology division through the appointment of Andy Furnival as Technical Director. Furnival, who previously held the position of Head of Technology at William Hill, will be tasked with managing Degree53’s technology strategy, as well as the oversight all of the technical teams, and support to the leadership team.As part of his new role, he will lead the technology and development strategy, working with development, infrastructure, architecture, DevOps and DBA teams. Furnival will work with them to ensure a clear and achievable strategy to drive operational procedure at Degree 53 in order to provide products and functionalities to their clients. Andrew Daniels, Managing Director at Degree 53, commented on the new appointment: “I’m very pleased that Andy has joined Degree 53 and he will be a brilliant asset in leading our technical development. Since establishing a gaming division two years ago, we’ve been heavily investing in technical talent to build high-end products for the online gambling industry. “Over this period, we’ve recruited solution architects, database administrators, automation testers and infrastructure engineers. All of this is part of our drive to create state-of-the-art technology for operators to improve their services and bring innovation to the industry. “I’m very proud of what we’ve already achieved and how many skilled individuals Degree 53 has hired over this time. Andy brings unrivalled expertise and leadership capabilities that will drive our development. I welcome Andy to the team and am confident he will transform our technical capabilities.”During his time at William Hill, Furnival’s responsibilities included managing strategic projects, such as maintaining compliance and regulatory standards, as well as streamlining sportsbook platforms.He oversaw three business divisions with over 130 employees spread across Europe. His role was to implement technical strategy and establish an efficient operating model with good working practices to be able to scale it in response to business demands.Furnival added: “I am extremely happy to be joining such a modern company that places technical expertise and innovation at its core.  I’m a firm believer in a learning culture and striving for continuous improvements, and that strategic goals must be balanced with pragmatism but always with a clear purpose of delivering value.”“My approach is to establish a working environment that allows teams to make efficient and effective decisions through a culture of trust, learning and safety. I believe that with my background in product development and strategy at the operator side, I will lead our teams to deliver even more robust and scalable products for our clients.” Share Submitlast_img read more

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