4 things every credit union needs to fight credit card fraud

first_imgBrutal. There is no other way to describe the plastic card fraud environment in 2015 where many credit unions were reporting more than 150 percent increases in fraud year-over-year. With the EMV liability shift in place since October 2015, fraud technologies being rolled out every day and a renewed focus to fight fraud, one would have hoped 2016 would provide a much needed relief from fraud losses. That isn’t turning out to be the case. Losses continue to mount and many credit unions are left wondering what else they can possibly do.While there is no single solution, there are credit unions that have made it through the fraud epidemic with fewer scars of progress by employing these four tactics.EMVAccording to CUNA Mutual Group data, 91 percent of reported losses in 2015 are from counterfeit cards. EMV was designed specifically to address this type of fraud by limiting the fraudsters’ ability to counterfeit cards. While fraudsters can still create magstripe cards, if used at a non-EMV enabled merchant, the credit union would have chargeback rights to minimize losses. Some credit unions have reported averaging over $40,000 in chargebacks per month since October 2015.MEMBER ENGAGEMENTWhile some may obsessively check every transaction that takes place on their plastic card, the reality is most members likely wait the 30-45 days for the statement to identify suspicious activity. To close the time horizon between when fraud occurs and when the credit union is notified, several credit unions have rolled out member notification and control options. By creating member engagement in monitoring accounts and using members to help compliment your data analytics, fraud can be spotted and addressed sooner.CARD-NOT-PRESENTFraudsters are most successful at perpetrating online or card-not-present fraud when they have access to CVV2/CVC2 (the three or four digit numbers) on the back of the credit card. Credit unions should ensure they are validating the presence of the correct CVV2/CVC2. One future solution that has the industry talking is a dynamic CVV2 where the number on the back of your card changes regularly. At this time, the expense of such innovation isn’t scalable, but other solutions are coming soon as Apple recently announced moving the Apple Pay process to online transactions in addition to its existing in-store and in-app functionality.1DATATrust me, you cannot have enough data. Once you have it, make sure to use it. The sign of a sophisticated plastic card program is one where each and every penny of fraud is reviewed and scrutinized. You cannot write fraud rules without patterns and you cannot identify patterns without data.Beyond writing rules, data can help you in common point of purchase analytics to see where a breach might be likely. If a breach is found, then you can block/reissue or move those affected members to a higher degree of risk scoring.While it is unrealistic to expect zero dollars in fraud loss that is the mentality we need to have during these difficult times in order to make 2017 better. Using these four tactics as well as constantly remaining vigilant will help the industry get there.CUNA Mutual Group’s Credit Union Protection Resource Center allows policyholders to access a wide array of helpful resources online, including training modules, regular releases of risks, and loss control recommendations. For registration information, contact CUNA Mutual Group at [email protected]: Apple Pay To Challenge PayPal in Online Transaction Market 67SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Robert T. Jarosinski Robert T. Jarosinski is a senior risk management consultant for CUNA Mutual Group. Contact him at [email protected] This article is for informational purposes only and should not … Web: https://www.cunamutual.com Detailslast_img read more

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March Madness 2019: Virginia happy to defend ‘ugly’ win: ‘That’s how we’re built’

first_imgIt was quite a different game from the one that finished the night.“Ugly is in the eye of the beholder,” Tony Bennett told reporters. “Maybe it wasn’t great, but I thought it was pretty good-looking for us defensively.“Offensively, there were struggles. But you have to just — you’ve got to hang in there defensively. That’s how we’re built.” LOUISVILLE, Ky. — They may be the only team of the 68 that entered the 2019 NCAA Tournament that is forced to continue defending when the final buzzer sounds.With a victory Thursday night, the Virginia Cavaliers advanced to the South Region final, which means they are one game away from the Final Four. As has happened before with this program, the artistic merit of their performance was not something that would impress the East German judge. Virginia defeated Oregon, 53-49, in the second of two Sweet 16 games at KFC Yum! Center. That was not the halftime score. It was the lowest-scoring Sweet 16 game since 2012, when Louisville defeated Michigan State by a 57-44 final.SN’s MARCH MADNESS HQLive NCAA bracket | Live scoreboard | Full TV schedule​“I really couldn’t care less. I’m so happy we won,” All-American guard Kyle Guy told Sporting News. “I wouldn’t care if it was 2-0 or 100-98. It doesn’t really matter. A win is a win. And if we move on to the Final Four, they’re not going to be like, ‘Oh, you remember when we beat Oregon 53-49?’ They’re going to be, ‘No, you remember when they went to the Final Four.’”Because Virginia has held 11 opponents this season below 50 points, it is going to take most of the blame/credit for the defensive orientation of this affair. UVA held the Ducks to 37.8 percent shooting from the field and its lowest scoring output since a 66-49 loss to USC on Feb 22.Oregon’s matchup zone, though, bewildered the Cavaliers. “They have a weird, funky, switching man/zone thing we couldn’t really ever figure out all the way,” Guy told SN.UVA made only 11 2-point field goals and might have been eliminated from the tournament were it not for two enormous 3-point baskets, the first by tiny freshman Kihei Clark (to tie the game at 45 with 5:21 left) and then by veteran point guard Ty Jerome (for a 48-45 lead with 3:33 remaining). A game-clinching layup by star wing De’Andre Hunter was the only other bucket the Cavs scored down the stretch.“They’re a great defensive team,” Jerome told SN. “I think we also missed a lot of good looks, a lot of 3s rimmed in and out. We missed a bunch of bunnies. We could easily have had 38 at half. We missed a bunch of easy ones.”Virginia has been dead last, out of 353 Division I teams in the “adjusted tempo” stat charted by KenPom.com each of the past two years. Coach Tony Bennett’s pack-line defense and patient offensive approach were cited last year as a significant factor in the team’s historic first-round loss as a No. 1 seed to No. 16 seed UMBC. They’re still playing the same way, though, and now they’ll face Purdue for the right to reach the Final Four.MORE: Ryan Cline gives Purdue a shot at generational Final FourBennett was an assistant under his father, Dick, with the Wisconsin team that reached the 2000 Final Four, beating Purdue in the West Region final. That was the Boilermakers’ last visit to the Elite Eight. They since have had great teams spoiled by a knee injury (forward Robbie Hummel in 2010) and an elbow injury (center Isaac Haas in 2018).Virginia has had dreadful injury luck itself. Its 2015 team lost star guard Justin Anderson for a month late in the season. The Cavs were 21-1 when he went down, only 2-2 after he returned in March.It will be a challenge for UVA to apply the same sort of defensive lock on the Boilermakers, who shot 54 percent from the field against Tennessee and also converted 48 percent of their 3-point tries. They scored 82 points in regulation before finishing overtime with a 99-94 victory.last_img read more

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Cornwall U12 mini tour scores a hit

first_img The Cornwall Golf Union has a huge hit on its hands after starting a mini tour to encourage U12 golfers. The first event, at St Enodoc, attracted 54 boys and girls, aged from five-years old, and the entry far exceeded the hopes of the organisers. For some of the players it was their first taste of junior golf. The youngsters played a fun, shortened version of the game over nine holes of stableford and they were all treated to a CGU bag tag and a Chinnydipper hat. Organiser David Watson, helped by the St Enodoc junior section, also ran putting and chipping challenges for the players. Now the tour moves on to Truro, Trevose and Newquay, before finishing at St Austell where the golf will be followed by dinner and a prize giving.   David Watson commented: “Retrospectively you would say why didn’t we do this a long time ago? But here we are, with an excited group looking forward to it all.” County Juniors’ President Alan Lund added: “Obviously the hope is we can make the events enjoyable for them so that they want to keep coming back and stay in the game.” 24 Mar 2017 Cornwall U12 mini tour scores a hit last_img read more

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Olympia Federal Savings Named Top Place to Work for 4th Straight…

first_imgFacebook62Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Olympia Federal SavingsFor the fourth straight year, Seattle Business magazine named Olympia Federal Savings (OlyFed) as one of the Top 100 Places to Work in Washington State. In fact, OlyFed ranked number six in the midsize companies’ category and this marks the fifth year that OlyFed has made the list.“This award is truly a reflection of the high-quality employees who’ve dedicated their careers to serving our customers and community,” said Lori Drummond, president and CEO at Olympia Federal Savings.Seattle Business Magazine rates companies based on confidential employee responses to an in-depth survey that includes benefits, communication, culture, retention, leadership, performance, decision making, recognition, training, and workplace environment.last_img read more

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Monmouth Medical Rocks at Roll Out the Ribbon Event

first_imgVyntEdge, with guitarists Robert Zanni, far right, pediatric pulmonologist at Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, and Chris Terry, far left, projects coordinator at Monmouth Medical Center, rocks the room at Monmouth Medical Center’s Roll Out the Ribbon Cancer Awareness event Thursday, Sept. 12, at McLoone’s Pier House in Long Branch. View video The Two River Times™ coverage on the web at tworivertimes.com.last_img

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STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – FRIDAY JANUARY 22, 2016

first_imgJockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won SADLER HAPPY WITH DRAW IN CLOCKERS’ CORNERTrainer John Sadler is looking forward to Sunday’s $75,000 Clockers’ Corner Stakes at about 6 1/2 furlongs on turf, in which he has entered Bench Warrant for the Doubledown Stables of Chicago’s Richard Templer.“The horse is kind of a specialist,” Sadler said. “He runs well down the hill every time. He was kind of unlucky in the Daytona last out on Dec. 26. When you look at the chart and where he came from and how far he got beat, it was a pretty good race.“We got a good draw, so we’re looking forward to it.”The Clockers’ Corner: Rocket Heat, Edwin Maldonado, 7-2; Holy Lute, Victor Espinoza, 6-1; Cape Wolfe, Flavien Prat, 10-1; County Lineman, Alonso Quinonez, 8-1; Fleet Eagle, Tiago Pereira, 30-1; Silentio, Mike Smith, 8-1; Coastline, Tyler Baze, 4-1; Home Run Kitten, Joe Talamo, 4-1; Ocho Ocho Ocho, Santiago Gonazlez, 8-1; and Bench Warrant, Drayden Van Dyke, 12-1. Peter Miller4063215%28%$207,380 Tyler Baze80613118%38%$343,382 SANTA MONICA AN OPEN RACE SANS SUNDAY RULESESPINOZA PUTS KIBOSH ON RETIREMENT REPORTSSPECIALIST BENCH WARRANT IN CLOCKERS’ CORNERDORTMUND IN BULLET DRILL FOR RICH SAN ANTONIO Vladimir Cerin941244%78%$111,050 (Current Through Monday, Jan. 18) SANTA ANITA STATISTICS Drayden Van Dyke3955513%38%$304,214 Joseph Talamo6489613%36%$396,588 Gary Stevens2042020%30%$491,780 SANTA MONICA FIELD GROWS WITHOUT BIG FAVORITESaturday’s Grade II Santa Monica Stakes drew nine entrants, thanks in no small part to the unexpected absence of Sunday Rules, who would have been the odds-on favorite in the seven furlong test for older fillies and mares.One horse entered that had been on the fence is Kyriaki, a 6-year-old Scat Daddy mare coming off a head victory in the mud at Delta Downs.“That’s why there’s such a big field,” said Peter Eurton, trainer of Kyriaki. “We fooled around with Kyriaki on the turf for 12 starts, but she’s been on dirt and won three and she’s gotten better with age.“I’m not 100 percent sure sprinting is her best gig. I think she wants a mile, but seven-eighths is not so bad.”Also set for the Santa Monica is Ben’s Duchess, fourth in the Grade I La Brea at seven furlongs on Dec. 26.“She had her prep Monday morning at 6:30 with Joe Talamo up,” trainer John Sadler said. “She went perfect. Hopefully, we’re going to rebound from her fourth-place finish in the La Brea. She missed getting a prep race for that race, but now she’s had a race and trained steadily with two good works going into the Santa Monica.”Ben’s Duchess worked five furlongs Monday in 1:00.20.Sunday Rules was not entered due to a skin infection in a hock, but it was minor and the front-running Tribal Rule mare will be pointed to the $150,000 Sunshine Millions Filly & Mare Turf Sprint at about 6 ½ furlongs a week from tomorrow, on Jan. 30.“It was just a two-day deal,” said Phil D’Amato, atop the trainer standings through 16 days with eight victories. “She’s back training full force. It was just one of those things that happen, and now we’re looking to run in the Cal Cup.”The Santa Monica: Prize Exhibit, Santiago Gonzalez, 4-1; Ben’s Duchess, Joe Talamo, 5-2; Kiss At Midnight, Gary Stevens, 12-1; Lost Bus, Fernando Perez, 20-1; Tara’s Tango, Mike Smith, 6-1; Room for Me, Martin Garcia, 3-1; Living The Life, Flavien Prat, 6-1; Kyriaki, Mario Gutierrez, 12-1; and Finest City, Corey Nakatani, 10-1. Mario Gutierrez67813612%40%$416,764 Mike Smith3642311%25%$416,200 David Lopez571141019%44%$332,028 Fernando Perez60741112%37%$296,716 Bob Baffert3474821%56%$437,120 Kristin Mulhall1442129%50%$150,350 Flavien Prat58841214%41%$427,408 VICTOR ESPINOZA NOT READY TO RETIREReports of Victor Espinoza’s retirement have been greatly exaggerated.In fact, the Triple Crown-winning jockey, just back from an awards ceremony in London, said at Clockers’ Corner Friday morning that contrary to a recent news report, he is not retiring, and a few hours later, his agent, Brian Beach, confirmed that.“There’s nothing to it,” Beach said. “People have to understand that after a grueling last six months and actually, the last two years, it takes a mental toll and it wears you down.“Victor is working a horse tomorrow morning at 6:30. He’s as hungry as ever. He’s not ready to retire.”Espinoza was in London where he participated in Longines World’s Best Racehorse ceremony at which American Pharoah was honored. “I got there Monday and left Wednesday,” said Espinoza, who is named to ride 6-1 chance Aguacate for Vladmir Cerin in today’s fifth race. “It was great. They gave me the best watch ever.“Longines designed it with the words ‘Triple Crown No. 5’ engraved on the back. That was American Pharoah’s saddle cloth number in the Belmont Stakes.”center_img FINISH LINES: Santa Anita Derby winner Dortmund, prepping for the $500,000 San Antonio Stakes on Feb. 6, worked six furlongs on Santa Anita’s fast main track Friday in 1:12 under regular rider Martin Garcia. Dortmund’s fractional times were 23.80, 35.60, 47.80 and 1:00.40, according to clocker Dane Nelson . . . Trainer Doug O’Neill has unbeaten Eclipse champion Nyquist set to work Sunday towards his three-year-old debut in the San Vicente Stakes on Feb. 15 . . . San Pasqual Stakes runner-up Imperative, also ticketed for the San Antonio, went four furlongs with Mario Gutierrez up for Richard Baltas Thursday in a bullet 46.40, fastest of 43 drills at the distance, the average time of which was 48.90. “It was a great work,” said Baltas, who has a busy weekend, with two horses entered today, five on Saturday and one on Sunday . . . David Jacobson, who has two horses entered today in quest of his first win this meet, is happy to date with the transition from the East Coast to California. “Everything’s great,” said Jacobson, who has 6-1 morning line chance You Know I Know in the third and 7-2 Caldera in the eighth. Jacobson also has entered horses at Golden Gate Fields in the Bay Area. “Wherever I think I can win a race,” he said, “I’ll go there.” Jacobson started 646 horses last year, winning with 128, a respectable 20 percent average . . . Geoff Shackelford, horse player and writer for Golf World & Golf Digest, and track announcer Michael Wrona, will be Tom Quigley‘s guests Saturday and Sunday respectively in the East Paddock Gardens at 11:20 a.m. . . . Agent Vince DeGregory has Tiago Pereira booked to ride Power Foot for Neil Drysdale in the Grade III John B. Connolly Turf Cup at 1 ½ miles at Sam Houston Jan. 30 . . . Santa Anita, home to America’s biggest winter betting pools, is currently handling on average more than $920,000 in its weekend Late Pick Four pools and more than $570,000 in the weekday Late Pick Four. Peter Eurton28410414%64%$194,700 Martin Pedroza3542111%20%$83,490 Edwin Maldonado57104718%37%$324,670 Abel Lezcano2231114%23%$122,120 Alex Solis830238%63%$174,384 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Mark Glatt2842114%25%$130,880 Martin Garcia3755714%46%$341,824 Richard Baltas3674319%39%$446,854 Rafael Bejarano751614821%51%$810,130 Jeff Bonde1242033%50%$94,260 Santiago Gonzalez901912921%44%$692,908 Doug O’Neill5949127%42%$276,832 Philip D’Amato4087920%60%$485,210 Alonso Quinonez3037110%37%$154,920 William Spawr1353038%62%$130,274 Kent Desormeaux323759%47%$302,970last_img read more

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Hotelier’s cat led employees to gruesome discovery

first_img“Big Foot” murder trialTwo former employees attached to the South Central Hotel testified before Justice Sandhill Kissoon on Wednesday that it was the pet cat of the deceased that led them to Joseph Jagdeo’s body, which was found bound and gagged in Room 10 of the guesthouse on November 14, 2018.Bryan Leitch of Diamond, East Bank Demerara, is currently on trial for the hotelier’s murder but has denied killing Jagdeo who was known as “Joe” and “Joey”. The prosecution contended that Leitch, also known as “Big Foot”, committed the crime between November 13 and 14, 2013 at South Road,Dead: Joseph JagdeoGeorgetown.During Wednesday’s trial, former maintenance man, Wendell Eastman, called “Buxton”, told the 12-member jury that Leitch, the accused, was initially staying in Room Nine just over a week prior to incident. He however moved to Room 10 after the accused argued with a female, who was staying with him. Eastman, who was living at South Central at that time, claimed that the girl and Leitch argued over the defendant “stealing Mr Jagdeo’s phone” and that she requested that the accused be removed. He told the jury that his hotel owner’s office was some four feet away from Room 10.Eastman said that November 13, 2013 at 07:00h was the last time he saw Jagdeo when he gave him a $1000 to buy a bottle of porridge for him. He said a worker “Trevor” went upstairs for 10 minutes and came back down. He also stated that later on, the bartender went upstairs. After some time, Eastman too went upstairs and called for his boss and never got a response. He further told the jury that sometime after 12:00h on November 14, he saw Jagdeo’s cat lying in front of the office door.“The cat leave the office door and start pushing its paw under the door at Room 10 hollering: meow,” the witness revealed.He said that he informed another worker, Patrick Wilson, called “Bullai” of the cat’s “strange behaivour.” After this, Eastman said he climbed onto a shed and peered through the jalousie window and saw the key to Room 10 on the bed. He claimed that he took a pipe, pulled out the key and gave it to “Bullai” who opened the room. The maintenance man said that at this point, the cat ran into the room, ran back out and started hollering “meow”. He said he told Bullai: “Don’t go in.”Wilson then took the stand and corroborated much of Eastman’s testimony, adding that after he opened the door of Room 10, he saw the body under the bed. He said he took out his cellphone and called the Police. Both witnesses under cross-examination admitted that they did not see the accused after November 13 and that they could not say how the deceased received his injuries.Meanwhile, former bartender at the hotel, Paulette Hollingsworth, testified that she tried several times to reach the owner, Jagdeo, but several calls to his cellphone were unsuccessful.The court also heard that after Jagdeo’s murder, the defendant and his mother, Sharmain Rover, were taken to Police headquarters following a wanted bulletin for Leitch’s arrest. The State’s case is being presented by Prosecutors Lisa Cave and Mandell Moore. Leitch is being represented by Defence Attorneys Hewley Griffith and Lawrence Harris.last_img read more

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Aiken captures Avantha Masters

first_img18 March 2013South Africa’s Thomas Aiken captured the second European Tour title of his career on Sunday, winning by three shots in the Avantha Masters at the Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort in New Delhi, India.“I played phenomenal golf, just two bogeys all week, and overall I’m just very pleased with the way I played,” he said in an interview on the 18th green after he had sealed victory in the event, which is co-sanctioned by the Asian Tour.Later, he wrote on his website: “The way I won my second tournament on the European Tour gave me fantastic satisfaction. I was really pleased with the way I handled the final round having started with a three-shot lead and eventually taking the Avantha Masters by the same margin.”Career victoriesApart from his two European Tour wins, Aiken has won seven times on the Sunshine Tour and added a win on the Asian Tour win with his victory on Sunday.He was the second South African winner of the tournament in succession, following in the footsteps of Jbe Kruger. Aiken was also the sixth South African winner so far this season on the European Tour in just 12 tournaments, but the first to record a victory outside of South Africa.He was 15-under-par for the last two rounds, after a tournament best 10-under-par 62 in the third round, which was a combination of great approach play and a red-hot putter.‘I’ve been playing very nicely’“I’ve been playing very nicely the last four months, not making a lot of mistakes, but just not sinking enough putts,” Aiken said.“This week a few went in. I hit some better iron shots, which gave me a better chance to sink some putts, and I played some phenomenal golf.”Gaganjeet Bhullar bagged an eagle and two birdies within the first five holes and went on to post a final round best of eight-under-par 64. It was enough to secure second place, but he was still three shots adrift of Aiken.Hole-in-oneThe South African’s playing partner Wenchong Liang started well with three early birdies, but a double drop on the sixth was a setback. A hole-in-one on the very next hole put the Chinese player back on track, but two bogeys on the inward nine undermined his challenge and he closed with a three-under-par 69.“These guys kept coming at me today – Liang on the front nine and then Bhullar made some amazing birdies coming in. It was by no means a walk in the park,” Aiken reckoned.Defending champion Jbe Kruger, the only other South African in the tournament, missed the cut after successive round of level-par 72.LEADERBOARD 265 Thomas Aiken (RSA) (-23) 67, 69, 62, 67268 Bhullar Gaganjeet (Ind) (-20) 68, 69, 67, 64/li>270 Wenchong Liang (Chn) (-18) 66, 66, 69, 69271 Kiradech Aphibarnrat (Tha) (-17) 68, 68, 66, 68272 Seuk-hyun Baek (Kor) (-16) 68, 68, 70, 66273 David Drysdale (Sco) (-15) 67, 67, 68, 71273 David Horsey (Eng) (-15) 72, 68, 66, 67273 Scott Hend (Aus) (-15) 67, 68, 68, 70 Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Banyana qualify for African Women’s Champs

first_img28 May 2014Banyana Banyana qualified for the finals of the ninth edition of the African Women’s Championship (AWC) after the Comoros withdrew from qualifying on Tuesday.The Football Federation from the island nation wrote a letter to the Confederation of African Football (CAF) to ask to be allowed to withdraw after they lost the first leg of their qualifiers against the South African National women’s team by 13-0 on Friday.The Comoros was scheduled to travel to South Africa next week for the second leg, which was set to take place on Saturday, 7 June.Big winPortia Modise and Leandra Smeda starred in the away leg of the qualifier, played on the artificial turf of the Stade Said Mohamed Cheikh Stadium, by netting four goals each. Sanah Mollo addeda brace, while Mamello Makhabane, Nomathemba Ntsibande and Shiwe Nogwanya also found the back of the net.“We prepared very well for the match, and I’m happy that the ladies have started finding the back of the net,” Banyana Banyana coach Vera Pauw said after the match.“We did not change the team, but we also gave other players a chance in the second half. We were dominating the game, there was not much competition from the start.”2014 African Women’s ChampionshipThe 2014 African Women’s Championship will be held in Namibia from 11 to 25 October.The tournament is also being used as a qualifier for the 2015 Fifa Women’s World Cup, with the top three finishers qualifying for the finals in Canada.‘Very unfortunate’“It is very unfortunate that Comoros had to withdraw from the qualifiers as it is not very good for the development of football in Africa,” Sasol Banyana Banyana coach Pauw said on Tuesday on hearing the news of the team’s withdrawal.“Even though I understand where they are coming from, I believe coming here to play their match would have been more beneficial for them as they would have learned a few other things.“But on the other hand I am quite ecstatic for qualifying for AWC in my first stint with Banyana Banyana, and I believe it is something worth celebrating.“I am really looking forward to the tournament, but we should not forget the bigger picture is to qualify for the Women’s World Cup in Canada. Going to AWC means we are a step closer to achieving that dream.”PreparationDespite the Comoros pulling out of AWC qualifying, Pauw said her preparation programme had not been dented.“Despite the setback of Comoros not coming, we are already looking for a match to play for that weekend because we need to keep the girls active. We will still be in camp regardless,” she said.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Peering into the future of agricultural change

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest USGS scientists led by Terry Sohl at the Earth Resources Observation and Science Center have created a crystal ball to better depict future agricultural land change and project outcomes. Sohl and his colleagues have modified the Forecasting Scenarios of Land-Use Change model to project agricultural change by parcel across a large region in the U.S. Great Plains.The new FORE-SCE model is unique in that instead of using small pixels, it uses ownership and land management boundaries from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. So scientists can mimic how farmers make decisions on the use of individual parcels of land, and then scale that up to regional and national levels.So, let’s say growing switchgrass to produce ethanol becomes more profitable for North Dakota farmers in the future. Or non-agricultural lands north of the Twin Cities prove advantageous for growing potatoes. The new FORE-SCE model can portray a broader geographic extent, higher spatial resolution at 30 meters, and higher thematic resolution with 28 land cover classes—including 14 different crop types—to project more realistic landscape pattern scenarios and better assess the ecological, economic, and climate outcomes from agricultural changes.That’s valuable knowledge not only in assessing how well agriculture in North Dakota can accommodate the need for more biofuel in the future, but also how large-scale agricultural change might affect biodiversity in the area—honey bees’ ability to pollinate, for example. With more realistic scenarios of increased potato farming in the Upper Mississippi River basin, the parcel-based model can help inform decision makers on how increased agricultural nutrients in groundwater might change water treatment requirements in the Twin Cities.Read more about the work of Sohl and his colleagues at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1747423X.2017.1340525last_img read more

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