West New York mayor: Sometimes, the real threat is people who…

first_imgWEST NEW YORK – On Friday, Jan. 27, the town of West New York sent out a press release to the media stating, “Today, January 27 marks the anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp in Nazi Germany by the Soviet troops in 1945. The countless victims of the Holocaust, indeed a turning point in the history of humanity, are not forgotten here in West New York.”He added: The Nazi regime and its collaborators systematically murdered about six million men, women, and children during World War II. The destructive program was developed to exterminate all Jewish communities by the Nazi regime. It was carried out at the continental level and was fueled by a fundamentally racist ideology.Nazi Germany also persecuted and killed millions of others for political, ideological, and behavioral reasons – including members of the Sinti and Roma gypsy communities, many Slavs, and countless disabled individuals because they were considered “racially inferior”.“Holocaust Remembrance Day is an opportunity to reach all heads of state and the public, in a common effort to commemorate and remember those who perished during the Holocaust, the survivors who lived through it, and the families of both.” said Felix E. Roque, M.D., Mayor of the Town of West New York.“We cannot deny the existence of unjust and destructive people throughout the world – but these people are not the primary threat. The real threat is the bystander or the person who implements horrific orders without asking any questions. Apathy is the monster that we must watch out for,” mentioned Mayor Roque. The last survivors of the Holocaust are disappearing, leaving perhaps the most important chapter of modern humanity to be told by the impersonal voice of scholars and novelists – oft, unfortunately, by the malevolent voice of counterfeiters and deniers. Holocaust Remembrance Day is a vital link in the transmission of the legacy we have inherited by both members of the Jewish faith and those who are not. Through memory and education, we honor their memory and shine the attention on those who were sacrificed in the name of an ideology.We must begin to collectively respect the core of universal values inherent in all great creeds, spiritual and secular, if we are to ensure that forces of darkness don’t return with vengeance to take refuge again. Keeping the memory of the Holocaust alive reminds our youth about the dangers of racist and fanatical ideologies” stated Mayor Roque.The Mayor Roque and the Board of Commissioners believe it is essential to honor and publicize the history of the Holocaust to raise awareness of the need to promote peace and human rights to prevent mass violence in today’s world.”Roque’s town is part of a region that has the second largest population of Cuban immigrants in the country, after Miami. ×last_img read more

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