Yastrzemski family reunion takes place at Fenway, Carl describes emotions of Mike’s arrival

first_img … BOSTON — For 52 years, nothing rivaled the emotions of winning the Triple Crown, the MVP and a Gold Glove all while leading the Boston Red Sox to an American League pennant for Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski.Yaz’s 1967 dream season has finally met its match.“The name Yastrzemski hasn’t been announced here since ’83,” Carl said.When the Giants opened a three-game series on Tuesday evening in Boston, Carl’s grandson, Mike, heard his name called over the Fenway Park public address system.last_img read more

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Table Mountain new natural wonder

first_imgTable Mountain has taken its rightfulplace as one of the new seven naturalwonders.(Image: Wikimedia Commons)MEDIA CONTACTS • Hannah DeallPR, Cape Town Tourism+27 21 487 6800RELATED ARTICLES• Saving the African penguin• Investors prefer Cape Town• Table Mountain needs your vote• Kirstenbosch best place to picnic• Cape Town gets new nature reservesSource: Cape Town TourismTable Mountain has been announced as one of the New7Wonders of Nature along with the Amazon, Halong Bay, Iguazu Falls, Jeju Island, Komodo and Puerto Princesa Underground River.In 2008, Table Mountain was identified as one of 440 magnificent natural sites selected by the New7Wonders Foundation to enter the three-phase New7Wonders of Nature contest.In the second phase, Table Mountain made the 77-site shortlist before being publicly voted onto a final shortlist of 28 sites in July 2009. After the final round Table Mountain was selected as one of the final seven.With this accolade, Table Mountain, Cape Town and South Africa can anticipate global attention.The New7Man Made Wonders – voted for in 2007 – has become part of school curricula all over the world. If the same happens to the New7Wonders of Nature, children from every corner of the globe could be learning about Table Mountain, Cape Town and South Africa as a destination.In an independent impact report conducted by Grant Thornton, a leading tourism hospitality and leisure research company, it was predicted that a R1.4-billion (US$177-million) annual tourism return can be expected for South Africa.Basing their projections on the New7Man Made Wonders, in which 100-million votes were cast worldwide, Grant Thornton estimate that tourism to Table Mountain, and thus Cape Town could increase by approximately 20%, resulting in the generation of employment opportunities.Standing proudCape Town Tourism CEO Mariëtte du Toit-Helmbold expressed her excitement, saying: “From being awarded the World Design Capital 2014 designation just a few weeks ago to Table Mountain being named one of the New7Wonders of Nature today, Cape Town and South Africa are standing proud!”She added that of the many benefits to be reaped from the accolade, the biggest is the potential for job creation.“In line with Cape Town Tourism’s new brand strategy for the city, we are working with individuals and companies on developing new, interesting and genuine tourism offerings to satisfy our changing travellers’ needs. With the anticipated increase in inbound travel to South Africa, and particularly to Cape Town, there are going to be increased entrepreneurial opportunities opening up.”A global iconOn 7 November 2011 Cape Town Tourism launched a bold new brand and marketing campaign for the city at World Travel Market in London.In addition, Cape Town Tourism has partnered with Johannesburg Tourism and Durban Tourism on a joint domestic marketing agreement that will offer affordable product and destination packages to and within these South African cities, as well as more robust event calendars across the board.The campaign also gave South Africans and people from other countries the chance to learn more about the mountain.Before the campaign, many people may not have known that Table Mountain is one of the oldest mountains on the planet, estimated to be around 360-million years old. Table Mountain was named a World Heritage Site in 2004 as part of the Cape Floristic Region, the smallest and richest of the only six floral kingdoms on the planet.It supports natural forest and indigenous fynbos along with a variety of animals and birds, including 8 200 rare and endangered plant species.Table Mountain is the only terrestrial feature on earth to have a constellation named after it. The southern constellation Mensa (originally Mons Mensae – Latin for “the table mountain”), was named in 1754 after the increasingly world-famous landmark in the then Cape of Good Hope.It was a symbol of hope for freedom fighters jailed on Robben Island. Table Mountain is a recognised as a global icon, visited by millions of people each year and attracting the attention of royalty, sports stars and Hollywood celebrities.It is one of the most photographed sites in Africa.last_img read more

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Innovative software tackles climate change and rainwater harvesting in Mozambique

first_imgA mobile app, designed by a Mozambican civil engineer, uses real-time climate data to help farmers in the region harvest rainwater more effectively. The app has been shortlisted for the Africa Prize for engineering innovation from the UK’s Royal Academy of Engineering.Civil engineer Aline Okello has designed mobile technology software to address the need for rainwater harvesting, and to share water management knowledge in Mozambique and the rest of Africa. She has been shortlisted for the Royal Academy of Engineering’s Africa Prize 2017. (Image: Royal Academy of Engineering)CD AndersonCivil engineer Aline Okello, who specialises in water sciences, has designed software to find rainwater harvesting solutions and create water management awareness in her country of Mozambique and across the rest of Africa. Okello is a Fellow at the Unesco Institute for Water Education, the largest international postgraduate water education facility in the world.Mozambique regularly experiences two weather extremes – very wet summers and very dry winters. Excessive summer rainfalls cause flooding, while harsh winters can affect farming. Okello has made it her life’s work to find a useable solution to combating the challenges by identifying climate patterns, specifically where and when the most rainfall is found.Her software sources reliable, live precipitation data from Nasa weather satellites; the data is then relayed to farmers via a mobile app, giving them vital information on the best time and place to harvest the rainwater in reservoirs for use during the dry season.Apart from helping farmers, the app can also advise rural communities on water management, harvesting rainwater on a small scale from rooftops and collection tanks.The key to the idea, says Okello, is knowledge. She tells The Guardian website: “(Mozambique has) only limited water management and infrastructure, so there is a huge need for growth and technology. People don’t have any idea how much water they can actually save … there is a huge information gap.”Smartphones are increasingly popular in Africa, even in rural communities, so smartphone technology presented the best way to spread the knowledge.Using the harvesting aspect of the app, users input the type of roof or collection reservoir they have, and then, based on their location and average rainfall figures, the software determines how much water can be harvested every day and month. The app also advises on harvesting methods and equipment needed to best collect and safely store rainwater.Previous methods of saving rainwater, using poorly built boreholes and contaminated containers, often led to the spread of waterborne diseases.Over the last year, Okello has been testing the technology among rural communities and farmers in South Africa, primarily around Mbonambi, KwaZulu-Natal.Ultimately, she hopes, the rainwater harvesting app will become a one-stop hub of easily accessible information to help the entire continent meet the challenges of climate change. She says: “My vision really is to bring information to people’s fingertips.”Royal Academy of Engineering’s Africa Prize 2017According to a press release from the Royal Academy of Engineering in London, its Africa Prize for engineering innovation is aimed at “encouraging ambitious and talented sub-Saharan African engineers from all technical disciplines to apply their skills to develop scalable solutions to local challenges, highlighting the importance of engineering as an enabler of improved quality of life and economic development”.Included in this year’s shortlist, along with Okello, are various ideas from eight African countries that find viable, environmentally friendly solutions to all aspects of African society. Three South African innovations, focused on solar energy, are on the shortlist. Candidates will pitch their ideas in Nairobi, Kenya, on 23 May 2017, following which the winners will be announced.As part of the Africa Prize initiative, vital commercial support and development of the shortlisted concepts means candidates such as Okello can take small, localised ideas and turn them in global game-changers.For more information about the Africa Prize, visit the Royal Academy of Engineering website.Source: Guardian, Royal Academy of Engineering  Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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