The Resurgence of Urban Housing

first_img  Print This Post About Author: Alison Rich Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Tagged with: Cities Housing Trends urban development July 4, 2018 1,715 Views While many homebuyers aspire to acquire their own piece of the provincial pie, a growing share are sticking close to the city, so proclaims a new Urban Land Institute (ULI) report. In fact, the population of urban neighborhoods in many metros is burgeoning as swiftly or almost as swiftly as that of suburban communities, it notes. The research analyzes how this growth has “accompanied the evolution of different types of urban neighborhoods, and how demographic and economic trends have shaped development in these areas,” ULI says.This growth, it continues, echoes ongoing consumer demand—most notably among younger cohorts—for living environments near jobs, transit, and urban perks, and that also rank high in walkability.A major finding: For the first time in decades, population growth in urban neighborhoods in the nations’ 50 biggest metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) is nearing suburban growth rates. Between 2010 and 2015, urban locations recorded a 3.4 percent growth rate, compared with 3.7 percent for suburban areas. These numbers contrast dramatically to 2000–2015, when the growth rate for urban enclaves was 1 percent, compared with 13 percent for suburbia.The study categorizes urban neighborhoods as such:Economic center–heavy clusters of employment, often historic urban cores, formerly 9-to-5 locales that are becoming 18-hour if not 24-7 neighborhoods. Emerging economic center–former single-family or low-density commercial areas evolving into new urban cores. Mixed-use district–high-density housing often dotted with upscale retail.High-end neighborhood–upscale single-family and multifamily housing, usually in historic areas with easy access to shopping and dining. Stable neighborhood–historically working-class neighborhoods with diverse housing types.Challenged neighborhood–areas with lower home values and apartment rents and minimal new development, often skirting former industrial and manufacturing districts.Some key discoveries: Seattle has the largest percentage of residents (13 percent) residing in economic centers, trailed by Washington, D.C., and San Francisco (each at 10 percent). Jacksonville, Florida, boasts the highest population (12 percent) in emerging economic centers, followed by Birmingham, Alabama (11 percent). New York City chalks up the largest number (26 percent) in mixed-use districts, followed by Chicago (23 percent). Seattle registers the heftiest percentage of residents (53 percent) in high-end ’hoods, followed by Austin (43 percent). San Jose tallies the largest number (82 percent) in stable neighborhoods, followed by San Antonio (71 percent). Hartford, Connecticut, records the most residents (68 percent) in challenged neighborhoods, with Detroit tagging just a point behind (67 percent).  While central hubs are enticing homebuyers, a swirl of both urbanities and surbanites in a city is actually a good sign, ULI notes. “Healthy metro areas will continue to feature a wide range of urban and suburban neighborhoods,” the report said.  in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, Market Studies, News Share Save Related Articles The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Alison Rich has a long-time tenure in the writing and editing realm, touting an impressive body of work that has been featured in local and national consumer and trade publications spanning industries and audiences. She has worked for DS News and MReport magazines—both in print and online—since they launched. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Cities Housing Trends urban development 2018-07-04 Alison Richcenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Resurgence of Urban Housing Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / The Resurgence of Urban Housing Previous: The Lingering Impact of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico Next: The Industry Pulse: Updates on Transunion, Vendorly, and More Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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Gov’t Mule Hints At Traffic Tribute Set For Halloween Performance

first_imgThis morning, fans on Gov’t Mule’s mailing list were sent a cryptic graphic that pointed to the band’s plans for Halloween 2016. The Mule-O-Ween show is scheduled for Saturday October 29th at The Palace Theatre in Albany, NY. While no details were specifically listed, the graphic clearly points to Mule covering the music of Traffic for this year’s Halloween performance!The graphic includes a traffic light in a raised colored cube, and the cube itself is reminiscent of Traffic’s famed Low Spark Of High Heeled Boys album cover. The traffic light itself features images in each of the lights – the red features the logo for the band Traffic, the yellow is a pumpkin representing Halloween, and the green is an artwork associated with Gov’t Mule.Taken as a whole, with the traffic light and Traffic references, the only interpretation must be a Traffic tribute set on Halloween. Whether that means a full album cover or a set of Traffic’s classics remains to be seen. As “Low Spark of High Heeled Boys” is a staple cover from Mule setlists, the choice does make sense, and we’re excited to see what other songs Mule might include in such a tribute.Check out their version of “Low Spark” with saxophonist Karl Denson in 2012:We’ll be sure to keep you updated as to any developments on Mule’s Halloween plans!last_img read more

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