Federal and State Leaders Raising Opioid Crisis in Rural America

first_img Facebook Twitter Previous articleFarmers Are More Pessimistic About the FutureNext articleJane Hardisty Honored at Conservation Awards Luncheon Gary Truitt Video list is empty.Federal and State Leaders Raising Opioid Crisis in Rural AmericaThe opioid crisis in rural America is getting attention from both state and federal leaders. President Trump raised the issue in his remarks to the AFBF convention this week, “We are confronting the scourge of drug addiction and overdoses that plagues too many of our rural communities.”Governor Holcomb raised the issue in his State of the State message Tuesday night and pledged more state support for local Hoosier communities, “We will Increase the number of opioid treatment locations from 18 to 27, so nearly everyone in the state will be less than an hour’s drive to treatment.’However, action needs to accompany conversation. USDA’s head of rural development Anne Hazlett says it is a top priority for her department in 2018, “We have a Community Facilities program that helps with local treatment clinics and transitional housing. We also have a distance learning and tele-medicine program that helps with equipment and delivering medical services.” She added that the re-organization at USDA has allowed greater focus on rural development and on the quality of life in rural America.Lt. Governor Crouch says Indiana is taking action to help local communities by dealing with the stigma of drug addition, “We have to erase the stigma associated with drug addiction and mental illness. It is a disease and an illness and, until we remove the negative stigma, we are going to continue to struggle with how we deal with this crisis.” The Indiana Social and Family Services Administration has launched an anti-stigma campaign to begin to change the public image of drug addiction and mental illness. Meanwhile, Indiana Senator Todd Young says the focus also needs to be on prevention, “We need to invest in preventative solutions as well as just remediating on the back end.”:A December survey, sponsored by the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Farmers Union, found that just under half of rural adults reported being affected by opioid abuse, compared with almost three-quarters, or 74 percent, of farmers and farm workers. AFBF President Zippy Duvall said local Farm Bureaus need to get involved on the local level, “We have 2,700 counties that have Farm Bureaus there, and what if each one of them empowered themselves as being the loving neighbors that we would if someone just got hurt by a cow and we went and done their work for them. Look what a difference we could make in their life and if we just save one farmer’s family from being destroyed by this, it’s well worth the effort they are putting into this.”One out of every five Hoosiers’ lives have been touched in some way by opioid addiction. Home Indiana Agriculture News Federal and State Leaders Raising Opioid Crisis in Rural America SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Federal and State Leaders Raising Opioid Crisis in Rural America By Gary Truitt – Jan 10, 2018 last_img read more

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Church of God Southern California: Moods of Faith

first_img 6 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Faith Essays & Inspirations Church of God Southern California: Moods of Faith Published on Monday, April 16, 2012 | 8:33 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Herbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Hollywood Divas Who Fell In Love With WomenHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News More Cool Stuffcenter_img Business News Moods of FaithA discussion on the Psalms’ Moods of Faith as explained by the Rev. David L. Antion, Pastor, Church of God Southern California. Rev. David L. Antion PhD. was ordained 47 years ago as a minister of Jesus Christ. He was pastor of churches for 38 of those years. He has taught these college classes: Marriage & the Family, Pastoral Care & Counseling, Epistles of Paul, Life & Teachings of Jesus Christ, and Marriage Counseling for Pastors. Over the last 33 years his education and experience have been strongly in the areas of marriage and family relations, human interactions of all types, human behavior and communication, the Holy Scriptures, health and nutrition.Church of God Southern California, 434 N. Altadena Drive, Pasadena, Email [email protected] or visit www.cogsc.info. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Arab uprisings shift to political struggles

first_imgMany of this year’s Arab uprisings are evolving from angry popular revolts into drawn-out political struggles to build democratic systems that will protect basic civic rights and social justice, analysts told a Harvard Kennedy School forum.Rami G. Khouri, an associate in the school’s Dubai Initiative and a prominent Beirut-based journalist, said that in Egypt, citizens have taken to the streets again to challenge the ruling military council not to backtrack from the spirit of the uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak.“In February and March, you had the birth of Arab citizens,” said Khouri. “What you are seeing today in Egypt is the birth of Arab politics. You are seeing the birth of the contestation of power, peacefully by and large, with people in the streets, and the military has been forced to respond… What comes next is the birth of true sovereignty and self-determination.”The John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on Monday, Sept. 19, titled “Inside the Arab Awakening,” also included Sultan Sooud Al Qassemi, a columnist based in the United Arab Emirates; Diana Buttu, a former spokesperson for the Palestine Liberation Organization and a fellow at the Kennedy School’s Middle East Initiative; and Karim Makdisi, a professor at the American University of Beirut.The moderator was R. Nicholas Burns, Kennedy School professor of the practice of diplomacy and international politics and director of the Middle East Initiative in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, which co-sponsored the forum with the Institute of Politics. The webcast of the event is available for viewing here. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Bringing global health home

first_imgAnyone who doubts the importance of global health issues or thinks that national boundaries will ensure safety from emerging diseases, consider this: We live in a time when the incubation period of every known human pathogen is longer than the longest intercontinental flight.“Think about that,” said Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, professor of medicine, and K.T. Li Professor of International Health. “You can pick up an infection in Mumbai, feel perfectly well and get on a plane, get off in Manhattan without showing any signs of illness. It’s just the world we live in.”That fact, regularly shared by former Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Dean Julio Frenk and repeated by Jha on Thursday, illustrates just half of the modern reality of global health. Because of modern transportation systems, an international economy, and rapidly advancing computer and communications technology, the world is more tightly knit than ever. When it comes to disease — such as the Ebola outbreak in West Africa — the problems of other countries are now ours as well.But the other side of the coin is that health professionals have more diagnostic and treatment tools than ever. Rapidly advancing knowledge is driving new technology, drugs, and procedures that collectively have made major strides in fighting once-intractable ailments, like HIV, malaria, and polio. Harvard is a leading player in creating, teaching, and sharing the knowledge that underlies those advances.The symposium was a retrospective look at the institute’s founding by former director Sue Goldie, remarks by David Golan, dean for graduate education at Harvard Medical School, David Hunter, acting dean of the Harvard Chan School, and Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“That’s our core business, knowledge,” Jha said. “We can create it — we do a pretty good job creating it. We can teach it. We can share it with the world … Knowledge is probably the single biggest force for good that the world has ever known.”Jha made his comments during a symposium at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s Knafel Center. The daylong event was organized to mark the fifth anniversary of the creation of the Harvard Global Health Institute and intended, Jha said, as a look both back and forward.The symposium featured comments by Harvard President Drew Faust, a retrospective look at the Institute’s founding by former director Sue Goldie, remarks by David Golan, dean for graduate education at Harvard Medical School, David Hunter, acting dean of the Harvard Chan School, and Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine. The symposium also featured discussions on leading and managing health systems, building human networks, and generating the knowledge needed to improve global health.In her opening speech, Faust reflected on Harvard’s longstanding efforts to improve health around the world, from past work that contributed to the eradication of smallpox and the near-eradication of polio to more recent work to fight HIV, the cholera epidemic that erupted in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake there, or the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.Global health, Faust said, is a uniquely interdisciplinary problem, touching all aspects of society and requiring insights and collaboration of faculty across discipline lines. She applauded the institute’s role in inducing that collaboration and called its work an example of the “One Harvard” that she has advocated during her presidency.“Global health … embodies what that integration and common purpose can be,” Faust said. “Global health was an ideal candidate for silo-free thinking.”Global health, said President Faust, is a uniquely interdisciplinary problem, touching all aspects of society and requiring insights and collaboration of faculty across discipline lines.Faust said she saw global health as an area not just of great potential for progress in the world, but as an area where Harvard’s strengths could have impact. New knowledge and tools, she said, make a leap in progress possible, even as new threats emerge.The student body seems to recognize this time of opportunity in worldwide health as well, Faust said. The number of undergraduates studying global health as a secondary field has doubled over the last five years. Students worldwide have expressed interest, Faust said, flocking to a HarvardX course on biostatistics and epidemiology, including some 8,000 participants in India alone.Roger Irving Lee Professor of Public Health Goldie, who stepped down as institute director last year to create the Global Health Education and Learning Incubator at Harvard University, reflected on the institute’s early years in answer to questions posed by Bruce Walker, professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology.The success among students of the global health secondary field is important, Goldie said, but a bigger achievement is that 5,800 undergraduates have taken courses that make them literate on the subject before they leave Harvard. It’s also important, she said, that the institute became a place where people could come together around the issue.While there are large challenges remaining, Goldie said that the world is in “a really unique moment” of progress on global health issues and that shared concern in that area can be a force for broader peace and security.last_img read more

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