Spiral Groove’s Revolution Turntable Turns Heads

first_imgIt’s a pretty great time to be a vinyl enthusiast. Not only has there been a resurgence in how many new releases are shipping on vinyl, but also in the relative quality of turntables, many of which can be had surprisingly cheap. The Spiral Groove Revolution would never be called cheap by anyone, no matter their income bracket, but with its eye-catching looks and forward-thinking engineering, it’s hard not to stare and dream.Designed to deliver what Spiral Groove calls “ultra-high-end” performance, the Revolution turntable does not spare any expense when it comes to the materials used or the build process. The turntable features a three-layer body made from aluminum and Delrin, which the company says makes for a solid build, but a less resonant platform.Unlike some of the relatively plain designs found in many modern turntables, the Revolution takes a different approach. The look is not retro, nor is it modern. Instead, the look is a combination of both, making it look like some vision of future tech from a 1950s-era sci-fi movie.The platter on which the record sits uses a Delrin top plate and aluminum bottom plate, along with a number of damping technologies used to reduce mechanical vibration. This includes Spiral Groove’s Strange Attractor isolation feet, which help to decouple the turntable from the surface it sits on, protecting against needle jumps from heavy footfalls and other heavy vibrations.When it comes to actually playing the record, a low-voltage / low-torque AC synchronous motor is attached to a one-piece motor mount that is decoupled from the rest of the turntable, making for quiet playback. The platter spins on an inverted sapphire disc / hardened steel bearing, the same used in Spiral Groove’s flagship SG 1.2 turntable. Playback speed is electronically switchable between 33-1/3 and 45 rpm.The Spiral Groove Revolution is available now and sells for a suggested retail price of $18,000. You will still need a tonearm, which is sold separately. The company offers the Centroid universal tonearm, which it says is a perfect match for the Revolution. For more information, visit the Spiral Groove website. Editors’ Recommendations How to Use a Vibrating Foam Roller Like Tom Brady 6 Fastest Cars in the World Right Now How to Cultivate Mid-Century Modern Style in Your Own Home The Evolution and History of the Home Stereo How to Clean a Fish: A Quick Reference Guide last_img read more

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AIADMK government did not act ahead of TNs water crisis Stalin

first_imgChennai: DMK President M.K.Stalin on Monday attacked Tamil Nadu’s ruling AIADMK government accusing it of not working proactively, when the lakes supplying water to the city started drying. Leading a prostest here demanding a solution to Chennai’s water crisis, Stalin said the government did not take act when the lakes supplying water to the city started drying. “The one question being asked by people across Tamil Nadu is ‘where is the water’? The AIADMK government has not completed any drinking water project in the state. Its party officials are holding yagnas in temples — not for the rains, but to protect their own government,” Stalin told the people holding the demonstration with empty pots. Also Read – Cong may promise farm loan waiver in Haryana The DMK chief said if his party comes to power, it will order a probe into the irregularities in the ongoing desalination water project. On Saturday, the DMK held protests at all the district headquarters to press the government to mitigate people’s suffering in the parched state. While Cholavaram (full capacity 1,081 mcft) and Redhills (full capacity 3,300 mcft) and Chembarambakkam (3,645 mcft) lakes that supply water to Chennai have run dry, there is only 19 mcft water left in Poondi reservoir (against a full capacity of 3,231 mcft), according to the Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board.last_img read more

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