Man dies under mysterious circumstances in custody

first_imgNew Delhi: A man accused in a smuggling case died under suspicious circumstances in custody of the police at Nand Nagri police station on Thursday morning.Delhi Police suspended one head constable and two constables in connection with the case. The investigating agency is waiting for the post-mortem report to ascertain the cause of death. Police identified the deceased as Govinda who lived in northeast Delhi area. He was accused of supplying illicit liquior on the basis of secret information, he was allegedly arrested with illicit liquior bottles from Nand Nagri area on Thursday. Also Read – Cylinder blast kills mother and daughter in Karawal NagarWith Govinda, his other associate Naeem was nabbed. Both were taken to the police station for further questioning. Additional Deputy Commissioner of Police (North East) RP Meena said that the incident took place after 9 pm in Nand Nagri police station when the condition of Govinda started deteriorating. Later, Govinda was taken to a hospital after he fell ill, however, the doctors declared him dead, police added. The Additional DCP further stated that they suspect that the Govinda might die of some health issues but they are waiting for the postmortem report which will clear the reason behind his death. Also Read – Two persons arrested for killing manager of Muthoot FinanceThe deceased’s family alleged that Govinda was beaten up inside the police station. RP Meena said that he was not beaten up by the policemen but they have also started an inquiry in the case. “So far no role of any police personnel in death,” said RP Meena. The investigating agency has suspended Head Constable Abhishek, Constable Vishal and Constable Udhaam Singh. “They have been suspended for their procedural lapse during the registration of the case,” added RP Meena adding that magisterial enquiry in the case is in progress. The family members of the deceased said that in the morning Govinda was taken to the police station. “He was well Govinda was beaten up,” deceased’s relative said. The investigation in the case is on from different angles to get more clues in the case. Recently last month a 55-year-old man jumped to death from the balcony of Bawana police station. Police said that he was called in the police station for routine inquiry about his son’s whereabouts.last_img read more

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SME book club What the tourism industry can learn about sustaining itself

first_imgAS PART OF this month’s theme of Tourism and the SME, we’ve taken a look at Elizabeth Becker’s Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism.When the author’s mother took off on a late-life travel adventure, it was the mid-1980s and she was one of 250 million tourists travelling internationally every year.“Today that figure is one billion and growing,” writes Becker, as she sets off to examine how travelling became arguably the biggest industry in the world – and who can gain, or lose, from that phenomenon.Who should read this book?Anyone with a business on which tourist numbers impact – but also anyone in government who has the power to mould how tourism can shape a country’s culture, environment and economy, for better or worse.What will it tell me? How the tourism industry has grown by encouraging the notion of leisure travel from what was once a “privilege” to “a basic right”. (And how this should bring with it an increasing sense of responsibility from both tourists and the industry on the sometimes negative impacts of this growth, eg, environmental, exploitation, property prices for locals.)From an industry perspective, Becker’s illustration of various forms of tourism through case studies is fascinating and comprehensive. She looks at cultural tourism via France, Venice, Camobodia; consumer via cruises, Dubai; nature via Zambia, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka. And she looks at how the old giant of tourism – the US – compares to how it’s being approached in what she terms “the new giant”, China.Becker, as a prize-winning US journalist, has a particular interest in the effect of travel journalism on the industry. She finds the relationship between the tourism industry and travel writers to be insidious, with “rave reviews” the return for “free trips, meals, hotels and nights on the town”. This, she argues, serves neither overhyped destinations nor the traveller well.Instead, she points to the example of Costa Rica which she says “is a laboratory for ecotourism, trying to protect the wilderness and all the wild things that live there and still have a profitable tourism business”.This almost-400 page leap into the tourism sector concludes that sustainability has to be more than a marketing buzzword on a glossy brochure for countries to protect the very cultural, natural and other attractions that bring in visitors.In a nutshell: Both tourists and those who make a living from them have a stake in resisting ‘fast’ tourism and cultivating more long-term goals. Is it elitist to wish for ‘better’ tourism – or just good economic sense?If you liked this, you’ll love:The Naked Tourist: In search of Adventure and Beauty in the Age of the Airport Mall>The Economics of Tourism>No Frills: The Truth Behind the Low-Cost Revolution in the Skies>SME book club: How can habits impact on a small business?>SME book club: Why Kenyans aren’t good distance runners – and what it means for businesses>last_img read more

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