Employers urged to change policy on mobile phones or face fines

first_imgEmployers urged to change policy on mobile phones or face finesOn 1 Dec 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Employers have been warned that unless they issue clear policies outlawingmobile phone use while driving on company business they could face fines of asmuch as £2,500. Laws banning individual drivers using hand-held devices such as mobilephones and hand-held computers came into force this month, but employers couldalso be liable if an offence is committed by staff. Amendments to the Road Vehicles (construction and use) Regulations 1986state that anyone who “causes or permits any other person to use ahand-held mobile phone while driving” will also be liable for a fine. Employment lawyers are warning that directors or managers could beresponsible if they instruct or expect staff to use a phone in a way thatbreeches the new rules. The Department of Transport issued guidance that explained employers wouldnot be committing an offence by distributing mobile phones for work use, butcould be held accountable if they told staff to do so. The guidelines also recommended that companies should ban staff from usingany mobile device while driving on company business. Stephen Elliott, an associate at law firm Ward Hadaway, said firms shouldissue a formal policy to staff that made clear it was not acceptable to breakthe new rules while at work. “Employers need to be very wary of these rules and a comprehensivepolicy on mobile phone use is recommended. It should be made perfectly clearthat using a phone to make or receive business calls while driving amounts togross misconduct,” he said. Drivers caught breaking the new rules will receive a £30 fine (shortlyrising to £60 and three penalty points) while Icis, a business mobile provider,predicts that employers could be fined £2,500 per driver. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Individual state and survival prospects: age, sex, and telomere length in a long-lived seabird

first_imgIdentifying markers that are indicative of individual state, related to fitness, and which could be used to study life-history tradeoffs in wild populations is extremely difficult. Recently, it has been suggested that telomeres, the ends of eukaryote chromosomes, might be useful in this context. However, little is known of the link between telomere length and fitness in natural populations and whether it is a useful indicator of biological state. We measured average telomere length in red blood cell samples taken from a wide age range of individuals of a very long-lived and highly sexually dimorphic seabird, the southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus). We examined the relationship with age, sex, and subsequent survival over an 8-year period. Telomere length was longer in chicks than adults. Within the adult group, which ranged in age from 12 to 40 years, telomere length was not related to age. For the first time in birds, there was some evidence of a sex difference. Male giant petrels, which are substantially larger than females, had significantly shorter telomere lengths than females. This difference was evident from an early stage in life and is likely to relate to differences in growth trajectories. Those adults that died during the 8-year time window following the telomere length measurement had significantly shorter telomere lengths than those that survived this period, irrespective of age or sex, neither of which were significant predictors of survival. These results show that relatively short telomere length is related to future life expectancy at any adult age, demonstrating its usefulness as a state variable.last_img read more

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Queen’s JCR VP and Social Sec banned from College

first_imgTwo JCR committee members at Queen’s College are understood to have been temporarily banned from the college after they were caught climbing on buildings.Two JCR committee members at Queen’s College are understood to have been temporarily banned from the college after they were caught climbing on buildings. The JCR Vice-President and Social Secretary were denied vacation residence in their college rooms during Freshers’ Week as punishment for being found on the roof of a building in Queen’s last week. The responsibility attached to their positions is believed to have contributed to the level of the disciplinary measures.The JCR Vice-President and Social Secretary were denied vacation residence in their college rooms during Freshers’ Week as punishment for being found on the roof of a building in Queen’s last week.The responsibility attached to their positions is believed to have contributed to the level of the disciplinary measures.last_img read more

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Oxford finalists ask for a say on exam re-arrangements in Covid-19 outbreak

first_imgFor students wishing to be assessed remotely, the Open Letter suggests an array of options: “Open-book exams completed online with conventional time limits; Vivas through video-conference; A portfolio of essays; coursework that replaces exams”. Photography By Ellie Wilkins Luci Dennewill, who co-wrote the letter with Zhengohong Lieu, emphasises the collective effort behind the Open Letter: “we had a lot of help from other finalists who wanted to make the project work”. Zhenghong Lieu stresses that the letter is not a “list of demands”, but is “merely a non-exhaustive list of suggestions for the University to consider”, highlighting the conciliatory tone of the letter that understands that “these are extraordinarily difficult times for all”, students and the Univerisity alike. One of the creators of the Open Letter, Luci Dennewill told Cherwell: “this is an anxious time for all of us finalists, and we are looking to make our voices heard and get clarity on the exam situation Finalists at Oxford have been compiling an Open Letter directed to Professor Martin Williams, the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education at Oxford University, concerning their final exams in light of the Covid-19 outbreak. It has received over 1,200 signatures in one day. Finalists have raised issues of access and equality regarding this “online approach”. The letter lists various different situations that display the inequality inherent to remote exams: “For instance, some students may not have a quiet environment in their homes to take a timed online exam and would prefer take-home exams. Yet others may need to take care of their ailing family members and have to delay their exams entirely.” For students wishing to postpone their assessment, they suggest “postponing exams and coursework deadlines until social distancing and quarantine measures have been sufficiently relaxed” or “giving finalists the option to restart the year in Michaelmas 2020, Trinity 2021”. They present three main suggestions for examination arrangements: remote, postponed and cancelled assessments. Under each option, the Open Letter provides different assessment arrangements ideas. Their central appeal is “that the University allows studentchoice with regard to the upcoming assessments.” They urge that students aregiven options on how they will be assessed that consider the varying ways thepandemic affects each student. In response to the Open Letter, Prof. Martin Williams told Cherwell: “I appreciate the considered and constructive tone of the Oxford Finalists letter and as rightly noted in the content the pandemic is having a huge effect on students who have been forced into an academic limbo through no fault of their own, and I sympathise. The letter highlights a precedent for option in the English Faculty at Cambridge University’s creation of a “2020 Tripos Survey for Part II students”, where Cambridge English finalists could voice their preferred options from a discrete list. Nevertheless, the Letter urges for an even more flexible approach to arranging new forms of assessment.   “Without question these are extraordinary times that are having unprecedented impact on the way we live. There are a lot of unknowns for us all but the University is working hard to alleviate some of the stress and uncertainty that our students are feeling and will provide more information to our community about Trinity term teaching and exams in the next few days as the situation becomes clearer.” “We understand that this is a really difficult decision for the university administration and the various faculties to make, so we didn’t want the letter to be an airing of grievances but rather a constructive expression of what we see as a feasible solution. We want to make sure our concerns are considered and that the solution the university arrives at is beneficial to as many finalists as in any way possible.”  For those “unable to undertake any further assessment at all in light of circumstances”, they suggest either receiving a grade based on previous work (for example: tutorials, grades already achieved, and previously submitted work) or “Graduating ‘declared to have deserved honours’ with an unclassified degree”. The letter emphasises that “imposing any one formula on the entire student body will unfairly disadvantage a significant number of its members as the pandemic affects us all differently.” Similarly, hundreds of Cambridge students have signed anOpen Letter calling for finals to either be postponed or for finalists toretake their final year. For more clarification or comment on Oxford’s Open Letter contact either Luci Dennewill or Zhengohong Lieu. The Open Letter comes as a response to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor’sstatement, sent to all Oxford students via email on Tuesday 17th ofMarch, wherein he confirmed “that wherever possible, teaching and learning willbe moved to an online format” and “that planned written paper examinations willnot go ahead in their normal format in Trinity term.” Instead, they intend toreplace traditional exams with “an online approach.”last_img read more

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Face to face…

first_imgQ How did you come into the baking industry?A My father was with Kelly’s Bakery in Kilcock as a salesman. When I was a child, I used to go down to the bakery with him and it was a love affair. I started at O’Rourke’s bakery (Mother’s Pride) in the days when you were signed into an indentured apprenticeship with a master.I still have the list of things we were precluded from doing, such as staying out late at night without permission. My brother, Robert, followed me into bakery and is presently with Johnston Mooney & O’Briens.After my apprenticeship, I attended Dublin Bakery College, where I was the first Irish citizen to be awarded the London City and Guilds Silver Medallion.The MD showed me competi-tors’ products and said that if I could produce them to an acceptable standard, packaged and costed, he would consider me to be a suitable candidate. So I did it and got the job as product development manager.That started my career in management and I later became bread bakery production manager and confectionery production manager; bakery general manager at Mother’s Pride Group (owned by RHM); and bakery general manager at Irish Bakeries.Q How did you get involved in yeast production?A I came into Yeast Products as CEO and later became managing director of the company.For me it was an interesting business, because yeast and its functionality is an issue of breadmaking and fermentation. So while they are two totally diffe-rent businesses, the logic between them has similarities. Because I knew what a baker would look for in yeast, we set out to achieve that as a business.That is the reason we have been very successful.Q Tell me about your links with the UK and becoming one of a handful of Irish members of the Worshipful Company of BakersA When I was with RHM, at its bakery on North Circular Road, Dublin, Derrick Warburton, father of Jonathan, who now heads up Warburton’s Bakery, was on our board and he invited me to work in ’back o’ th’ bank’ in Bolton to see their bakery operation and get a good grounding. Mother’s Pride had bakeries across the UK and I worked in many of them.Some years back, I was invited to go along to the Worshipful Company of Bakers and attended events so I was subsequently invited to join and was delighted to do so. More recently, I have become a liveryman of the company. I’ve been asked by the master to bring my chain of office of Irish Association of Master Bakers. That will be the first time that chain of office will have officiallybeen worn, in its 100 years in existence, at the Election Banquet in the Mansion House in London. It is a big honour.All of these things are forging the links between our two islands.Q What do you hope to do as president of the Irish Association of Master Bakers (IAMB)?A At our conference, members spoke about how the industry has been the subject – not only here but across the world – of bad press, and not all of it based on fact. I hope that, over the next two years, the industry can put together a response to these spurious claims and enhance the image of bread and its part in a healthy diet. The industry at large has to decide how to proceed. IAMB is the umbrella body, with a role in pulling all industry groups together where there is a common issue like this.Q What other issues are facing Irish bakery?A The industry continues to diversify and rationalise. It has been responding to changing market demand and bakers have been introducing new products. The demand for variety is beginning to grow and that trend will continue. So we will have a wide range of products in Irish bakeries, just as there are in European bakeries.It has come full circle. In my youth, every baker produced a full range of bakery and confectionery products, which were all sold fresh every day and they had all the skills that went into that. But with the advent of supermarkets, the sale of fresh products as wholesale was centralised.Now, the industry is embracing new technology – the concept of using frozen product, retarded products and gas flushing, for example – technologies that extend the lifespan of products and open up opportunities for greater variety.Q How has the issue of training been tackled in Ireland?A Skillnets is going very well and gives us the opportunity to train bakers in-situ. It is a structured and focused programme. Pat Garvey is responsible for it and he has done an excellent job. He won an award for creating one of the best Skillnets programmes across all industries. The bakery industry was complimented for the quality of its training programme.Matching training needs with the industry’s needs is vital. As pressure is exerted to comply with different standards or product demand patterns, training is provided. The Bakery School’s interaction with the industry has diminished, but there will always a place for a national bakery college in the bakery industry.Q What are the difficulties and opportunities in the Irish market?A It is not right that bread should be selling at low prices. It is taking away from our industry the ability to reinvest and meet the needs of consumers. As a wholesome foodstuff, bread should command a reasonable price.I hear of the pressure on pricing in supermarkets, where small amounts of money affect decisions to purchase.If bread is sold on price alone, you would sell only cheap products – but that is not the case; bread is beginning to find a place again as an important quality food item in the shopping basket.There is a renaissance in the craft bakery sector. You come across French, Polish, and other bakeries in Ireland now and they are bringing their skills with them. That process is finding favour among consumers. Irish bakers, too, have been diversifying and introducing new products and new bakeries are opening.Q What do you do when you are not at work?A I follow rugby, and am an avid supporter of the Irish squad, and I read quite a bit. My wife, Angela, and I have also travelled a lot – in Italy, Spain and Portugal, of late.I like Italy – in particular its culture, social background, art and history – and I am, inevitably, drawn to bakeries wherever I am.My son, Paul, graduated from University College, Dublin, with a B. Com (Hons) and is running a restaurant in Cabinteely (in Ireland). He is into food big-time. As a child he used to help me to make mince pies at Christmas and, as he got older, graduated to more advanced items.last_img read more

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How Seasons Bakery has changed since its Britain’s Best Loaf win

first_imgSeasons Bakery’s performance at Britain’s Best Loaf 2020 was nothing short of outstanding.Not only did the Ingleton-based business secure first place in the White category with its Tasty Tin Loaf, it was also highly commended in the Sourdough with Other Ingredients and Plain Sourdough categories for its Beetroot Multiseed Sourdough and Granary Sourdough, respectively. The Beetroot Multiseed Sourdough, meanwhile, feature two types of beetroot. Fresh grated beetroot is added to the sourdough ferment bringing flavour and colour, while beetroot that has been roasted with herbs, spices and olive oil is added to the dough.To find out more about how the other category-winning loaves at Britain’s Best Loaf 2020 are made, click the links below:Gail’s Bakery: how to make Britain’s best gluten-free loafHow Peter Cooks Bread made Britain’s Best Loaf 2020 Sourdough successSeasons’ Granary Sourdough (pictured above) was named highly commended in the Plain Sourdough category at Britain’s Best Loaf 2020, which was sponsored by ADM, American Pan UK and Scobie McIntosh/Revent. It’s made with a blend of granary flour and strong wheat flour.“We make up a granary ferment where we soak 80% malted flour to the ferment and feed it on that. You feed it again and use it as you would a normal sourdough,” explains Nemeth.“We bulk ferment it for 12-16 hours in the fridge, which adds loads of taste, we pull it out and divide it when it’s cold, bench rest it for three hours, mould it and put it back in the fridge until the next morning. All in all, it’s just over at three-day process – like the beetroot sourdough.” Source: Seasons BakeryDan Nemeth, Seasons Bakery owner (pictured right), described the news as “a shock”. “We baked some nice bread that night – they were pretty perfect but it’s always a risk as you don’t know what others are doing.”The Beetroot Multiseed Sourdough, at least, was a safe bet having previously been named Britain’s Best Loaf in 2017 and won Speciality Bread Product of the Year at the 2019 Baking Industry Awards.“I really didn’t expect to win the white loaf category,” Nemeth admits. “I’ve been after it for years. I’ve won the innovation and sourdough class before, so it’s nice to win the white class as well.”The Tasty Tin Loaf is no ordinary white loaf. It’s made via a much longer process than a standard loaf.When everything is doom and gloom, it’s quite easy to get sucked into that. Doing awards like this and winning is a massive pick-me-up for the team“We make two starter doughs – a sponge and a ferment using our famous sourdough ferment – and we mix them together to make another ferment and use pull back from the white loaf dough from the day before. That makes our master sponge,” he explains. Yeast is also added.“It’s quite a lengthy process. We refrigerate the sponge overnight which adds loads of taste.”It’s the taste that keeps customers coming back. Seasons Bakery sells thousands of white loaves and has even gained two new wholesale contracts for the Tasty Tin Loaf since winning the award.“As soon as we win an award like that, people want it. It was the same when we won with the beetroot sourdough. We make thousands of them now,” Nemeth says. Source: Seasons BakeryThe win will be further publicised to as Seasons Bakery has had stickers made up for the loaves to showcase it.With all these awards, Nemeth admits Seasons Bakery is running out of space for certificates on the wall and the trophy cabinet is filling up fast. But they’re a real boost for staff, even more so recently.As soon as we win an award, people want the products“This year it’s been particularly hard for teams up and down the country and as a boss it’s been hard keeping morale up. When everything is doom and gloom, it’s quite easy to get sucked into that,” he says. “Doing awards like this and winning is a massive pick-me-up for the team.”A lot has changed at Seasons this year as business went “absolutely mental” during lockdown. “Some days we were making up to 8,000 sourdoughs in a 24-hour period, all by hand. It was round the clock production. The oven never turned off; the mixer never turned off.”The business has taken on 20 staff this year across its whole operation and introduced new ways of working to ensure staff are kept safe. This included redesigning the bakery to ‘zone off’ areas, introducing an evening, night and morning shift and converting the storeroom into a cake and patisserie room. A wagon, which sits outside the bakery, was transformed into the new storeroom.An operations manager and a shop manager are among the new hires as Nemeth explains he had to dissect the business as “it can’t just be me in charge anymore”. The positivity of Seasons Bakery, as seen on its social media channels, has helped with the hiring, Nemeth adds.He has also invested in new machinery spending over £100,000 on equipment this year including ovens, a bread slicer and crumber.Looking to the future, Nemeth is “passionate about going green” with composting systems and cardboard recycling in place, while flour bags will be shredded to become packing material.last_img read more

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Bankers turning toward green lending as climate risks rise

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Some of Europe’s largest banks are unveiling plans to lend and manage money in greener ways as pressure mounts to account for risks associated with climate change.“It is coming, it’s a trend that’s started,” said Louis Douady, head of corporate social responsibility at Natixis SA in Paris. “The intention is to adapt our balance sheet to climate transition, so clearly we want to have a change in our business mix.”Financial institutions are beginning to get on board with the global fight against climate change, a movement that was until recently the territory of non-profit organizations and environmentalists. Natixis, UBS Group AG and ING Groep NV are among lenders unveiling large-scale environmental finance and investing initiatives as central banks and regulators step up their warnings on climate risk.Natixis is working on a new color-coded indicator that will be applied to about 60 percent of its activities to encourage more climate-friendly business. The system, due to start by year-end, uses shades of green, brown or neutral to reflect a transaction’s risk weighting on the bank’s balance sheet. The greener the project, the lighter the risk.UBS recently introduced a sustainable investing strategy to its wealth management arm in Switzerland, the U.K. and the Asia Pacific region that has amassed more than 2 billion euros ($2.4 billion) from investors in the first six months of the year.“Demand for sustainable and impact investing has undeniably been on the rise in recent years,” said James Purcell, head of alternative and sustainable investments at UBS. “The game changer has been the realization that this investment strategy does not mean sacrificing returns.”More: Banks Pivot Toward Greener Finance in Climate Action Push Bankers turning toward green lending as climate risks riselast_img read more

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CFPB issues resources on LIBOR transition

first_img continue reading » When NCUA issued its 2020 supervisory priorities, one item of note was preparing for the end of London Inter-bank Offered Rate (LIBOR). We blogged about this and briefly covered the topic in an article for our Compliance Monitor(member only). Now there are some new resources and a proposed rule from the CFPB on this issue.The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority has announced that it can no longer guarantee the reliability of LIBOR beyond 2021. Currently, LIBOR is used an indicative measure of the average interest rate at which major global banks could borrow from one another and often tied to consumer loan rates. Although not all credit unions rely on LIBOR as an index for variable rate loans, some do and Regulation Z has limitations for changing an underlying index on products. In the FAQ document, the bureau summarized various provisions that may come into play. For closed-end products, this includes:Adjustable-rate mortgage origination disclosures under section 1026.19(b)(2); ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Sanofi donates vaccine, cases soar in Chile, Australia ups alert level, more NYC deaths, antivirals safe in pregnancy

first_imgJun 17, 2009Sanofi donates 100 million pandemic vaccine doses to WHOA Sanofi executive announced today at a health conference in Seattle that the company will donate 100 million doses of novel H1N1 influenza vaccine to the World Health Organization (WHO) to support its efforts to help the world’s poorest nations respond to the pandemic, the company said in a press release. The company said that once vaccine production begins it will set aside 10% of doses to donate to the WHO. Novartis said recently it will provide discounted, but not free, vaccines.[Jun 17 Sanofi press release]Novel flu cases soar in ChileThe number of novel H1N1 cases in Chile surged to 3,125 today, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported, citing a government update. The number is 1,431 more than the total for Chile reported by the WHO on Jun 15. Chile has reported two deaths from the virus, which seems to be striking children the hardest: 64% of infections are reported in the 5- to 19-year-old age-group. Elsewhere in South America, Argentina reported three more deaths, according to media reports.[Jun 17 AFP story]Australia moves to new pandemic alert levelAustralian Health Minister Nicola Roxon today raised the country’s pandemic response level from “contain” to “protect,” according to a government statement. The level is a new phase that was created to address the moderate severity of the novel H1N1 pandemic and is in line with the WHO’s phase 6 declaration, the government said. The “protect” phase calls for an emphasis on treating people who have severe infections. Roxon said states will phase in the new response level by Jun 26.[Jun 17 Australian government statement]NYC reports 7 more H1N1 deathsHealth officials in New York City reported seven more novel H1N1 deaths, raising the total to 23, according to the city’s latest surveillance update. Few details were available about the latest victims, though the report said all were between the ages of 25 and 64 and that most were hospitalized in late May at the peak of the outbreak. Overall, of the 20 deceased patients whose history was known, 16 had underlying medical conditions that put them at higher risk.[New York City Department of Health report]Tamiflu, Relenza appear safe for pregnant womenLimited data indicate that the flu drugs oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) are relatively safe for pregnant women, who are at increased risk for flu complications, says a review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Oseltamivir is preferable for pregnant women because more safety data are available, but either drug may be used. Both drugs are considered compatible with breastfeeding. The novel H1N1 virus is sensitive to both drugs but resistant to older antivirals.[Early-release CMAJ article]US Virgin Islands, St. Maarten report first casesTwo Caribbean island territories, the US Virgin Islands and Dutch St. Maarten, have reported their first H1N1 flu cases, according to the Associated Press (AP). In the Virgin Islands, a woman who recently returned to St. Thomas from a trip abroad had the virus but was doing well. On St. Maarten, a 22-year-old American student at the American University of the Caribbean was recuperating, the story said.[Jun 16 AP report]last_img read more

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Buyer breaks street record to live the Tuscan life

first_imgInside the home at 18 Craig St, Wishart.The auctioneer managed to get the price up to $1.5 million and the property was called on the market.Competition ramped up again with the bids peaking at $1.5755 million.Mr Comino said the home sold to a family from China who were looking to buy close to their children in Carindale.The agent said the Wishart market was still performing well despite a slow down since 2015-16.“The higher (end of the market) is a bit tougher but it’s still a seller’s market,” he said. The home at 18 Craig St, Wishart.A Tuscan villa-inspired home has smashed a street record after selling under the hammer in Wishart.The property at 18 Craig St sold for $1.5755 million at auction.The previous street record was set when no. 15 sold for $1.252 million in August.Kosma Comino of LJ Hooker Sunnybank Hills said it was the highest sale for a property under 1000sq m in the 4122 postcode.“It’s an iconic home and the auction pulled a massive crowd of more than 60 people,” he said.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The property attracted eight registered bidders who pushed the price to $1.47 million where it looked like it would be passed in.last_img read more

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